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Categories - Explore and Be Inspired

Categories - Explore and Be Inspired
Related:  ListeningJust to inspire students

A food festival Introduction When students are going to do a listening activity, it is useful to get them thinking about the topic of the listening beforehand. That way they can reactivate and extend their store of vocabulary. In this lesson, students first discuss the topic of food festivals, then they focus on their listening skills in preparation for part 2 of the FCE listening test. Through a series of activities students will become more aware of what to ‘notice’ in a gap fill listening exercise, enabling them to do the Listening part 2 more successfully. Topic Listening skills for FCE Listening part 2 Level Time 75 minutes Aims To encourage students to predict which parts of speech are missing in gapped texts.To familiarise students with part 2 of the Listening test of the FCE exam.To develop students’ listening skills. Materials Lesson plan: download Worksheets (1, 2A, 2B, 3): downloadNote to teachers: worksheet 1 is reproduced twice on the page to reduce paper usage. Audio script: download

The Atlantic slave trade: What too few textbooks told you - Anthony Hazard The Atlantic slave trade sent slaves to various locations in the world. What effect did this forced migration have on these areas? Visit the Mariner’s Museum Captive Passage website. Gain some more perspective on how the slave trade affected the Americas. Gain a greater understanding of life aboard the slave ships at PBS. What do North America, the Caribbean, Brazil, Europe and Africa all have in common? Are their myths and misconceptions about slavery?

Podcasts to help English learners practise listening Do your students want more listening practice? Aoife McLoughlin, blogger with ELT-Connect.com and latest winner of the British Council's Teaching English blog award, recommends five podcasts to get them started. Do you spend enough time working on listening skills with your students? Is there ever enough time? In my experience, I would say no. Often, when we ask students what part of their English they most want to improve, they will say listening and speaking. But we often give less attention to the receptive skill of listening, perhaps in the belief that 'if you can do it alone, you can do it at home'. Podcasts are a great way for students to improve their listening on the go. With such a huge selection available, students are bound to find a podcast they are interested in that suits their needs. Here are my top five podcasts for learners of English: Englishclass101.com This is much more than a podcast. TED audio podcasts Podcastsinenglish.com IELTSpodcast.com Downtobusinessenglish.com

What really happens to the plastic you throw away - Emma Bryce If you watched this video, you’re probably interested in how plastics are made, and what impact they have on the environment. For starters, you might want to watch this video that shows you how plastic bottles are produced. The American Chemistry Council also has some helpful guidelines on how the material is manufactured, what different types there are, and what role monomers and polymers play in the manufacturing process. Moving on from the molecular stuff, plastic also has more visible impacts on the earth. Talking of hazards, plastic in the ocean is one of the greatest hazards of all. But there’s hope: plastics can be recycled, after all. Finally, this TED speaker shares some ‘tough truths about plastic pollution’, and in this talk, you can meet the man who first discovered those ‘garbage patches’ in the sea. Watch these other TED Ed lessons on Plastics and Pollution!

Some interesting resources for listening at basic levels | English in Soria VOA news: News in easy American English, with transcripts.ESL Lab: An interesting site with a lot of listening exercises.YouTube SpeakOut videos, e.g. Enjoy them, and please tell me if I could add any to this list! Like this: Like Loading... Why do your knuckles pop? - Eleanor Nelsen Want to learn the latest on this topic? Read the recent publication: Real Time Visualization of Joint Cavitation aka “knuckle cracking!” Then listen to the latest Morning Edition at NPR: Why Knuckles Crack! Scroll down at the site and watch an MRI of knuckle cracking in real time to see the “pop” during the “pull my finger study!” Here’s another interesting physiological phenomenon that has to do with gas solubility: decompression sickness, or “the bends.” These escaping bubbles can cause a variety of symptoms including joint pain, rashes, shortness of breath, headaches, and fatigue. Ever wonder how underwater organisms avoid the bends? Decompression sickness can also occur when going from standard atmospheric pressure to much lower pressure, like those higher in the atmosphere.

BusyTeacher.org While these are crucial concepts, others are equally important. What follows is an assortment of alternative ways to teach listening, some quite simple and others based on many years of research. In each case, I will explain each one briefly and give you a suggestion for using it in class. In addition, I have provided a list of resources about each item, for readers who want to learn more about a topic. Get the Entire BusyTeacher Library: Dramatically Improve the Way You Teach Learn more 9 Different Ways to Explore Listening 1Affective ListeningAffective listening (not to be confused with effective listening) refers to listening with the student motivation at the forefront. In conclusion, I’d like to point out that not all of these concepts may be useful in your classroom. Your students might prefer a competitive listening game over applying metacognitive awareness to their burgeoning listening skills. Resources: AFFECTIVE LISTENINGRost, M. and Wilson, JJ. 2013. Bilbrough, N. 2014.

7 TED-Ed Lessons for a healthier you How do carbohydrates impact your health? What would happen if you didn’t sleep? How does sugar affect your brain? In honor of World Health Day, here are 7 TED-Ed Lessons for a healthier you: 1. The things we eat and drink on a daily basis can impact our health in big ways. 2. When you eat something loaded with sugar, your taste buds, your gut and your brain all take notice. 3. Water is essentially everywhere in our world, and the average human is composed of between 55 and 60% water. 4. In the United States, it’s estimated that 30 percent of adults and 66 percent of adolescents are regularly sleep-deprived. 5. Our hard-wired stress response is designed to give us the quick burst of heightened alertness and energy needed to perform our best. 6. We have over 600 muscles in our bodies that help bind us together, hold us up, and help us move. 7. If you lined up all the blood vessels in your body, they’d be 60 thousand miles long.

BusyTeacher.org YouTube, as well as websites such as wikihow.com, instructables.com, and soyouwanna.com, have an incredible assortment of guides on how to do almost anything, from cutting up onions to making paper airplanes. In this article, I’m going to explain how to adapt a video tutorial into a listening lesson for your ESL/EFL classes. How-to videos contain a number of features which makes them perfect for exploitation in the ESL/EFL classroom: authentic English with natural pronunciation content that relates to everyday life a wide range of topics that can be used images and (in some cases) titles and subtitles which make the meaning clearer the pleasure of learning a useful skill and new English vocabulary at the same time The following sections will guide you through several steps of planning for using a how-to video in class. Searching for the Right Video First of all, you need to think of something that your class would enjoy learning. Planning Your Lesson First, start with a pre-listening task.

Expand Your Mind - Puzzles and Brain Teasers To expand your mind you need to learn new facts and develop new modes of thinking that will make the information that you already know more useful. Solving the following problems requires a combination of world knowledge, mathematics, common sense, logic, and science (chemistry, physics). This is not an IQ test. There is no time limit. To expand your mind, do not look at the answers until after you have made an honest effort to figure out the problems. The Bear A bear walks south for one kilometer, then it walks west for one kilometer, then it walks north for one kilometer and ends up at the same point from which it started. The Chicken and Egg Problem A chicken farmer has figured out that a hen and a half can lay an egg and a half in a day and a half. The Chicken and Leg Problem A chicken farmer also has some cows for a total of 30 animals, and the animals have 74 legs in all. The Bacteriologist At what time was the container half full? How big was the container? Moon Photographer Eye Puzzle

BBC Learning English - Dramas from BBC Learning English Questions no one knows the answers to - Chris Anderson 1) Ask teachers for their favorite unanswered questions. Create a large display space in your school or in some other public area in your community where people can write down other big questions, and/or identify which of the already-posted questions seems especially intriguing to them. 2) Anderson asks, “Why do so many innocent people and animals suffer terrible things?” Humans have been asking this whopper of a question for almost as long as humans have existed. Explore some of the explanations that have been offered by religious leaders, philosophers, writers and others. Identify three or four viewpoints that seem particularly provocative and different from one another. SoundVision’s The Really Big Questions Psychology Today: The Big Questions Blog John Templeton Foundation: Big Questions Essay Series

10 Best Free Listening Websites with Quizzes to Practise for Listening Exams So what do you do to practise listening for exams? Growing up, I never had the opportunity to do any extra practice to improve my listening skills. We didn’t have the Internet and the thousand possibilities it offers to learners of any language nowadays. The teachers had an old tape player that sometimes stopped and started on its own and old tapes that ended up sounding distorted and most of the times unlistenable so if you wanted to get better at listening, you just listened to the radio and struggled to understand the lyrics and sing along. Not that I ever complained. So, exams are just around the corner and I know you’re beginning to freak out. These are, in my opinion, the best sites with quizzes to practise listening comprehension. Check also:

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