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Reported Speech

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Reported Speech. We often need to tell others what someone else said. There are two ways to do this. One is to say the same words and use quotation marks. That is "direct speech. " The other method is to summarize, or tell about what someone said. This is called "reported speech. " Before we get into the rules for reporting speech, here are the terms we are using to explain it. Rules for reporting speech To get this kind of sentence right, there are four things you should keep in mind: The first rule is to choose a reporting verb and tense. When did the speech happen? The second rule is to change the perspective, or point of view. That means I becomes he, she, or they. "Mary said 'I ate the pie. "' becomes "She said that she ate the pie. " "The boys said, 'We are coming tomorrow'" becomes "They said they are coming tomorrow.

" Next, choose whether to include "that or "if. " You can say, "He says he is at home" or "He says that he is at home. " The fourth rule is to "backshift" the tense. "I am buying my ticket. "

Reported Speech: The Grammar Gameshow Episode 25

Reporting statements. Reported Speech (Advanced) Reported speech. We use reported speech when we want to tell someone what someone said. We usually use a reporting verb (e.g. say, tell, ask, etc.) and then change the tense of what was actually said in direct speech. So, direct speech is what someone actually says? Like 'I want to know about reported speech'?

Yes, and you report it with a reporting verb. He said he wanted to know about reported speech. I said, I want and you changed it to he wanted. Exactly. She said she was having the interview at four o’clock. OK, in that last example, you changed you to me too. Yes, apart from changing the tense of the verb, you also have to think about changing other things, like pronouns and adverbs of time and place. 'We went yesterday.' > She said they had been the day before. I see, but what if you’re reporting something on the same day, like 'We went yesterday'? Well, then you would leave the time reference as 'yesterday'. 'Dogs can’t eat chocolate.' > She said that dogs can’t eat chocolate. Exactly. OK. Yes. Great. Reported speech. We use reported speech when we want to tell someone what someone said. We usually use a reporting verb (e.g. say, tell, ask, etc.) and then change the tense of what was actually said in direct speech.

So, direct speech is what someone actually says? Like 'I want to know about reported speech'? Yes, and you report it with a reporting verb. He said he wanted to know about reported speech. I said, I want and you changed it to he wanted. Exactly. She said she was having the interview at four o’clock. OK, in that last example, you changed you to me too. Yes, apart from changing the tense of the verb, you also have to think about changing other things, like pronouns and adverbs of time and place. 'We went yesterday.' > She said they had been the day before. I see, but what if you’re reporting something on the same day, like 'We went yesterday'? Well, then you would leave the time reference as 'yesterday'. 'Dogs can’t eat chocolate.' > She said that dogs can’t eat chocolate.

Exactly. OK. Yes. Great.

Grammar: How to use reported speech

Reported speech 2 – article. By Kerry G. Maxwell and Lindsay Clandfield An article by Kerry Maxwell and Lindsay Clandfield on approaches to teaching reported speech. Introduction Whenever we use reported speech, we have to take into account how circumstances have changed since the speaker originally spoke the words. Referring to people If we were making an arrangement to meet a friend, we might say something like: 'I’ll meet you in the park at 3 o’clock.' If we then later report what we have said to another friend, we might say something like: I said that I would meet her in the park at 3 o’clock. Notice how you in the original statement becomes her in the reported clause.If somebody else was reporting what we said to another friend, they might say: She said that she would meet her in the park at 3 o’clock. Here, I has become she in the reporting clause, and you has become her in the reported clause. You said you would meet me in the park at 3 o’clock. 'Is she your sister?

' Referring to places 'I eat here every Saturday.' Reported speech 1 – article. By Kerry G. Maxwell and Lindsay Clandfield An article by Kerry Maxwell and Lindsay Clandfield on approaches to teaching reported speech. Introduction In English, there are two ways of telling someone what someone else has said.

Often we may choose to repeat their actual words using a quote structure or quotation, e.g. ‘We’re getting married on Saturday!’ ‘Are you going to invite your father?’ However, when the information that someone conveys is more important than their actual words, we may want to explain what they have said using our own words, e.g. She said that she was getting married on Saturday. Joe asked whether she was going to invite her father to the wedding. Examples like these are sometimes referred to as indirect speech or reported speech.

She said … Joe asked … This is followed by a reported clause showing someone’s original statement, question or thought, e.g. … (that) she was getting married on Saturday. … whether she was going to invite her father to the wedding. 1 . 2. 3. Reported Speech and the 'Historic Present' Tense. The 2008 film, The Dark Knight, tells the story of Batman, a fictional superhero. At one point in the movie, Batman's enemy, the Joker, says the following lines: My father was a drinker and a fiend. And one night, he goes off crazier than usual… He turns to me, and he says: 'Why so serious? ' Today's report is not about violent stories. Nor is it about superheroes. You will learn how Americans report speech in everyday situations. So, what is the link between the Joker's lines and reported speech? Reported Speech In everyday speech, speakers often report what others say.

They quote what other people told them, or they repeat what they said themselves. The verb say is often used to report direct speech in conversation, note Susan Conrad and Douglas Biber, two English grammar experts. Here is an example: In the example, the speaker used the verb say in the past tense just before the speech that he was reporting. "Historic present tense" Direct speech makes a story more exciting. What can you do?

Say or tell?

Reporting questions, suggestions, advice and instructions. The Flatmates episode 26, from BBC Learning English. Changes in place, time and person in indirect speech. Everyday Grammar: Reported Speech. Reading Comprehension Activity for Reported Speech. Reported speech or "reported discourse" is when an individual verbally recalls information from something they heard or read. It can be either directly quoted or indirectly conveyed and is an important aspect of communication. Using reported speech in conversations shows listening skills and allows an individual to relate to others. Read this short excerpt about a funny incident in the park. Once you have finished, answer the reading comprehension questions and complete the reported speech activity.

Guess Who I Bumped Into? Tim wandered along the path thinking aloud, "If I continue this diet I should lose twenty pounds by the end of... " when BOOM! "I'm terribly sorry," he apologized, "I was so caught up in my thoughts, I didn't see you! " Smiling, Sheila responded, "It's OK. Suddenly they both stopped making excuses and stared at each other. "Don't I know you from somewhere? " They both began to laugh as they had met each other the week before at a party that Jack had given. Reported Speech Exercise 1.

Passive reporting structures: BBC English Class. Everyday Grammar: Mastering Reported Speech. We often need to tell others what someone else said. There are two ways to do this. One is to say the same words and use quotation marks. That is "direct speech. " The other method is to summarize, or tell about what someone said. This is called "reported speech. " Before we get into the rules for reporting speech, here are the terms we are using to explain it. Rules for reporting speech To get this kind of sentence right, there are four things you should keep in mind: The first rule is to choose a reporting verb and tense.

When did the speech happen? The second rule is to change the perspective, or point of view. That means I becomes he, she, or they. "Mary said 'I ate the pie. "' becomes "She said that she ate the pie. " "The boys said, 'We are coming tomorrow'" becomes "They said they are coming tomorrow. " Next, choose whether to include "that or "if. " You can say, "He says he is at home" or "He says that he is at home. " The fourth rule is to "backshift" the tense. "I am buying my ticket. " Dr. Reporting speech | Learning English Grammar. Reported speech | Learning English Grammar. Verb tenses in reported questions undergo the same changes as in statements. See Reported speech. ‘Are you ready?’ He asked (us) if/whether we were ready.

‘What time is it?’ He asked what time it was. ‘Where has Jim gone?’ Reporting verbs for questions include ask, inquire, want to know, and wonder. Direct yes/no questions are linked to the reporting clause by if or whether. Verb tenses in reported questions undergo the same changes as in statements. Reporting verbs for questions include ask, inquire, want to know, and wonder. Direct yes/no questions are linked to the reporting clause by if or whether. Reported speech.

Direct speech

Reported statements. Reported Speech Exercise 1. Reported statements future simple. Reported Speech Exercise 8. Reported statements present perfect. Reported speech: indirect speech - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary. Indirect speech focuses more on the content of what someone said rather than their exact words. In indirect speech, the structure of the reported clause depends on whether the speaker is reporting a statement, a question or a command. Indirect reports of statements consist of a reporting clause and a that-clause.

We often omit that, especially in informal situations: The pilot commented that the weather had been extremely bad as the plane came in to land. I told my wife I didn’t want a party on my 50th birthday. Indirect reports of yes-no questions and questions with or consist of a reporting clause and a reported clause introduced by if or whether. She asked if [S] [V]I was Scottish. The waiter asked whether [S]we [V]wanted a table near the window. He asked me if [S] [V]I had come by train or by bus. Indirect reports of wh-questions consist of a reporting clause, and a reported clause beginning with a wh-word (who, what, when, where, why, how). He asked me what I wanted. Compare. Reported Speech Exercise 11. Reported statements past simple. Reported Speech Exercise 9. Everyday Grammar: Mastering Reported Speech. Reported statements present continuous. Reported Speech Exercise 10. Reported statements present simple.

Reported Speech Exercise 12. Reported Speech Exercises. Reported Speech Exercises Here's a list of all the reported speech exercises on this site: (Click here to read the explanations about reported speech) Reported Statements: Reported Questions: Reported Orders and Requests: Reported Requests and Orders Exercise (intermediate) (in PDF here) Mixed Exercises: Return to reported speech explanations from reported speech exercises.

LoginSubscribe to PEG+What's New? Reported Speech. Click here for a list of reported speech exercises.Click here to download this explanation in PDF. Reported Statements When do we use reported speech? Sometimes someone says a sentence, for example "I'm going to the cinema tonight". Later, maybe we want to tell someone else what the first person said. Watch my reported speech video: Here's how it works: We use a 'reporting verb' like 'say' or 'tell'.

Direct speech: “I like ice cream”.Reported speech: She says (that) she likes ice cream. We don't need to change the tense, though probably we do need to change the 'person' from 'I' to 'she', for example. (As I'm sure you know, often, we can choose if we want to use 'that' or not in English. But, if the reporting verb is in the past tense, then usually we change the tenses in the reported speech: Direct speech: “I like ice cream”.Reported speech: She said (that) she liked ice cream. * doesn't change. Direct speech: “The sky is blue”.Reported speech: She said (that) the sky is/was blue. For example: Reported Speech Exercise. English Language Practice: Indirect Speech. In conversation and writing, dialogue may be either direct or indirect. Direct speech comes from the source, whether spoken aloud or written as a quotation.

Indirect speech, also known as reported speech, is a second-hand account of something a person said. Using the Past Tense Unlike direct speech, which occurs in the present tense, indirect speech usually occurs in the past tense. For example, the verbs "say" and "tell" are used to relate a conversation that you have had with someone. Tom: I'm working hard these days.You: (relating this statement to a friend): Tom said he was working hard lately.Annie: We bought some truffles for a fancy dinner.You: (relating this statement to a friend): Annie told me they had bought some truffles for a fancy dinner. Using the Present Tense Indirect speech sometimes can be used in the present tense to report to someone who has not heard the original statement.

Pronouns and Time Expressions Questions Direct speech: Do you want to come with me? Verb Changes. Reported Speech. Search Results for “reported speech” Reported Speech Exercise. Verb + Object + infinitive/gerund/that-clause. BBC Learning English - Course: intermediate / Unit 11 / Grammar Reference. BBC Learning English - Course: Upper-intermediate / Unit 2 / Grammar Reference. BBC Learning English - Course: Upper-intermediate / Unit 2 / Grammar Reference. BBC Learning English | Ask about English | Reported speech. Reported speech: reporting nouns. Reported speech - 02. 'I must go - I'm late'He said he _____________ becuase he was late.'What are you going to do?

'She asked me ______________ .'I'm on my way now.'She says ________________________ .'I've been working here since I was 15.' Reporting verbs - 01. Reported speech - 02. Reported speech - 01. Synonyms for "Said" | Grammar Quizzes. Reported Speech Quiz | Grammar Quizzes. B1 Grammar: Reported Speech. English Language Practice: Indirect Speech. Reported Speech Reading Comprehension Activity. BBC Learning English - Course: intermediate / Unit 11. Speech. Reported speech: indirect speech - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary. Reported speech - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary.

Reported speech - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary. Reported speech: direct speech - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary. ("Reported Speech " "indirect Speech") modal verbs at DuckDuckGo. Reported Speech (Indirect Speech) How to Indicate Unspoken and Indirect Discourse. Reporting: reports and summaries. Grammar: indirect speech. Reporting verbs with that, wh- and if clauses.