GLOBAL HEALTH & INDICATORS

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Human Development Index. Download the latest Human Development Index Data View the HDI Frequently asked questions The HDI was created to emphasize that people and their capabilities should be the ultimate criteria for assessing the development of a country, not economic growth alone.

Human Development Index

The HDI can also be used to question national policy choices, asking how two countries with the same level of GNI per capita can end up with different human development outcomes. These contrasts can stimulate debate about government policy priorities. The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of average achievement in key dimensions of human development: a long and healthy life, being knowledgeable and have a decent standard of living.

The health dimension is assessed by life expectancy at birth component of the HDI is calculated using a minimum value of 20 years and maximum value of 85 years. The standard of living dimension is measured by gross national income per capita. World Bank Indicators. Health. World Health Organization. World Health Statistics. World Health Organization Global Health Observatory. World Bank Indicators. Two major MDG targets achieved. It’s been a good few days for Millennium Development Goals.

Two major MDG targets achieved

Not one but two targets were reported as met last week, which means that we have reason to celebrate. First, the Economist reported on March 3 that global poverty in 2010 was half the level it was in 1990, meaning that in spite of the worldwide economic downturn, fewer people are living in absolute poverty. And on March 6, the United Nations reported that in 2010, 89 percent of the world’s population enjoyed access to safe drinking water — 1 percent more than the 88 percent requirement published at the Millennium Summit in 2000. These accomplishments translate to much more than a mere check mark on the world’s proverbial to-do list. For the first time since 1981, the number of people living in absolute poverty is dropping — which means better opportunities for longer, healthier lives the world over. RECOMMENDED: MDGs 2.0: Why not ask the poor what they really need?