background preloader

Mith

Facebook Twitter

Why Vampires Never Die. 10 Creatures in Scandinavian Folklore. Creepy The Scandinavian Folklore consists of a huge variety of creatures, good or evil, which have frightened people for centuries.

10 Creatures in Scandinavian Folklore

They were often meant to scare children, but even today they are essential and important to the modern northern society. In the 1890s, something changed in the way common Scandinavians saw themselves and their culture. They looked back in time to rediscover their old myths and legends; folklore which had been forgotten because of the coming of Christianity. It was a time when people feared nature, because we were becoming more industrialized.

Huldra (or called Tallemaja in Swedish) is a troll-like woman living in the woods. These beings are actually still very important in the modern society. Ancient Viking code deciphered for the first time. An ancient Norse code which has been puzzling experts for years has been cracked by a Norwegian runologist - to discover the Viking equivalent of playful text messages.

Ancient Viking code deciphered for the first time

The Ultimate Online Resource for Norse Mythology and Religion. What Happened On Easter Island — A New (Even Scarier) Scenario : Krulwich Won... We all know the story, or think we do.

What Happened On Easter Island — A New (Even Scarier) Scenario : Krulwich Won...

Let me tell it the old way, then the new way. See which worries you most. Robert Krulwich/NPR First version: Easter Island is a small 63-square-mile patch of land — more than a thousand miles from the next inhabited spot in the Pacific Ocean. In A.D. 1200 (or thereabouts), a small group of Polynesians — it might have been a single family — made their way there, settled in and began to farm. These settlers were farmers, practicing slash-and-burn agriculture, so they burned down woods, opened spaces, and began to multiply. As Jared Diamond tells it in his best-selling book, Collapse, Easter Island is the "clearest example of a society that destroyed itself by overexploiting its own resources.

" When Captain James Cook visited there in 1774, his crew counted roughly 700 islanders (from an earlier population of thousands), living marginal lives, their canoes reduced to patched fragments of driftwood. Aztec Mythology: Gods and Myth. The first sun, the watery sun, was carried off by the flood.

Aztec Mythology: Gods and Myth

All that lived in the world became fish. The second sun was devoured by tigers. The third was demolished by a fiery rain that set people ablaze. The fourth sun, the wind sun, was wiped out by storm. People turned into monkeys and spread throughout the hills. Sources "Aztec Gods and Religion. " IRISH LITERATURE, MYTHOLOGY, FOLKLORE, AND DRAMA.

Irish Writers OnlineIrish PlayographyStudy Ireland: Poetry - BBCIrish Women Writers - M.

IRISH LITERATURE, MYTHOLOGY, FOLKLORE, AND DRAMA

OckerbloomIreland Literature GuidePoetry Ireland / Éigse ÉireannEarly Irish Lyric Poetry - Kuno MeyerSonnets from Ireland - E. BlomquistColum's Anthology of Irish Verse - Bartleby.comBREAC - Digital Journal of Irish Studies Medieval Celtic ManuscriptsThe Book of KellsCarmina GadelicaCELT Irish Electronic Texts Irish Writers OnlineIreland Literature ExchangeBibliography of 19th-c. Irish Literature - J.M. Jonathan SwiftJonathan Swift ArchiveJonathan Swift Biography - IncompetechGulliver's Travels - U. Bram StokerDraculaBram Stoker Biography - Classic Literature LibraryBram Stoker's Dracula - Carstens smith Oscar WildeThe Official Home Page of Oscar WildeWilde Biography - BBCOscar Wilde OnlineCELT: Oscar WildePoetry of Oscar Wilde - Bartleby.com George Bernard ShawShaw Biography - C.

William Butler YeatsYeats Biography - Poetry FoundationCollected Poems - W. Donn ByrneByrne Biography - J. Fine Art Oisín. Lost Civilizations: Atlantis. National Geograhic. By Richard A.

National Geograhic

Lovett and Scot Hoffman Crystal skulls are not uncommon or terribly mysterious. Thousands are produced every year in Brazil, China, and Germany. But there are a handful of these rather macabre objects that have fueled intense interest and controversy among archaeologists, scientists, spiritualists, and museum officials for more than a century. There are perhaps a dozen of these rare crystal skulls in private and public collections. Many believe these skulls were carved thousands or even tens of thousands of years ago by an ancient Mesoamerican civilization. List of tree deities. Yakshi under a stylized ashoka tree.

List of tree deities

Railing figure at Bharhut Stupa, 2nd century BC, India Examples of tree deities[edit] The Yakshis or Yakshinis (Sanskrit: याक्षिणि), mythical maiden deities of Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain mythology are closely associated with trees, especially the ashoka tree and the sal tree. The Nine Muses of the Greek Mythology. “Sing to me oh Muse”… The Nine Muses of the Greek Mythology were deities that gave artists, philosophers and individuals the necessary inspiration for creation.

The Nine Muses of the Greek Mythology

Hesiod reveals that they were called Muses or Mouses in Greek, as the Greek word “mosis” refers to the desire and wish. The word museum also comes from the Greek Muses. DRYADS & OREADS : Nymphs of Trees & Mountains. THE DRYADES & OREIADES were the beautiful Nymphs of the trees, groves, woods and mountain forests.

DRYADS & OREADS : Nymphs of Trees & Mountains

They were the ladies of the oaks and pines, poplar and ash, apple and laurel. For those known as Hamadryades, trees sprung up from the earth at their birth, trees to which their lives were closely tied. While the tree flourished, so did its resident nymph, but when it died she passed away with it. There were several classes of Dryades associated with a particular types of tree: Tree worship. Tree worship (dendrolatry) refers to the tendency of many societies throughout history to worship or otherwise mythologize trees.

Tree worship

Trees have played an important role in many of the world's mythologies and religions, and have been given deep and sacred meanings throughout the ages. Human beings, observing the growth and death of trees, the elasticity of their branches, the sensitivity and the annual decay and revival of their foliage, see them as powerful symbols of growth, decay and resurrection. The most ancient cross-cultural symbolic representation of the universe's construction is the world tree. Epic of Gilgamesh. The Epic of Gilgamesh, an epic poem from Mesopotamia, is considered the world's first truly great work of literature. The literary history of Gilgamesh begins with five Sumerian poems about 'Bilgamesh' (Sumerian for 'Gilgamesh'), king of Uruk. These independent stories were used as source material for a combined epic.

The first surviving version of this combined epic, known as the "Old Babylonian" version, dates to the 18th century BC and is titled after its incipit, Shūtur eli sharrī ("Surpassing All Other Kings"). Hob (folklore) A hob is a type of small mythological household spirit found in the north and midlands of England, but especially on the Anglo-Scottish border, according to traditional folklore of those regions. They could live inside the house or outdoors.

They are said to work in farmyards and thus could be helpful, however if offended they could become nuisances. The usual way to dispose of a hob was to give them a set of new clothing, the receiving of which would make the creature leave forever. It could however be impossible to get rid of the worst hobs.[1] A famous hob called the hobthrust lived near Runswick Bay in a hobhole, and was said to be able to cure whooping cough.[2]

Rubedo. Interpretation[edit] The symbols used in alchemical writing and art to represent this red stage can include blood, a phoenix, a rose, a crowned king, or a figure wearing red clothes. Countless sources give mention to a reddening process. The seventeenth dictum of the 12th century Turba Philosophorum is one example: O Turba of Philosophers and disciples, now hast thou spoken about making into white, but it yet remains to treat concerning the reddening! Know, all ye seekers after this Art, that unless ye whiten, ye cannot make red, because the two natures are nothing other than red and white. Jung[edit] The Self manifests itself in "wholeness," a point in which a person discovers their true nature.

See also[edit] References[edit] Jump up ^ Shaeffer, Katherine H. Further reading[edit] Jung, C. External links[edit] Chaos (cosmogony) Rubedo. Nigredo. For the character in Xenosaga, see Gaignun Kukai. Nigredo is also an album by Diary of Dreams. Nigredo, or blackness, in alchemy means putrefaction or decomposition. The alchemists believed that as a first step in the pathway to the philosopher's stone all alchemical ingredients had to be cleansed and cooked extensively to a uniform black matter.[1] Jung[edit]