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The History of Python. BeginnersGuide. New to programming?


Python is free and easy to learn if you know where to start! This guide will help you to get started quickly. Chinese Translation New to Python? Read BeginnersGuide/Overview for a short explanation of what Python is. Getting Python Next, install the Python interpreter on your computer. There are currently two major versions of Python available: Python 2 and Python 3. See BeginnersGuide/Download for instructions for downloading the correct version of Python.

At some stage, you'll want to edit and save your program code. Learning Python Next, read a tutorial and try some simple experiments with your new Python interpreter. If you've never programmed before, see BeginnersGuide/NonProgrammers for a list of suitable tutorials. Most tutorials assume you know how to run a program on your computer. Once you've read a tutorial, you can browse through Python's online documentation. When you are ready to write your first program you will need a text editor. Need Help? The Hitchhikers Guide to Python! — pythonguide 0.0.1 documentation. Style Guide for Python Code. Python (programming language) Software Carpentry. The Problem Many scientists and engineers spend much of their lives writing, debugging, and maintaining software, but only a handful have ever been taught how to do this effectively: after a couple of introductory courses, they are left to rediscover (or reinvent) the rest of programming on their own.

Software Carpentry

The result? Most spend far too much time wrestling with software when they'd rather be doing research, but still have no idea how reliable or efficient that software is. The Solution This site presents an intensive course on basic software development practices for scientists and engineers. Python beginner's mistakes. Every Python programmer had to learn the language at one time, and started out as a beginner.

Python beginner's mistakes

Beginners make mistakes. This article highlights a few common mistakes, including some I made myself. Beginner's mistakes are not Python's fault, nor the beginner's. They're merely a result of misunderstanding the language. However, there is a difference between misunderstanding (often subtle) language features, vs misunderstanding the language as a whole, and what can (and cannot) be done with it. To put it another way, the mistakes in this article are often cases of "the wrong tool for the job", rather than coding errors or sneaky language traps. Mistake 1: trying to do low-level operations Python is sometimes described as a VHLL, a Very High-Level Language.

This doesn't mean that it isn't possible to do these things with Python; but it's probably just not the right language for these jobs. Mistake 2: writing "language X" code in Python. The Zen of Python. Abstract Long time Pythoneer Tim Peters succinctly channels the BDFL's guiding principles for Python's design into 20 aphorisms, only 19 of which have been written down. The Zen of Python Beautiful is better than ugly. Explicit is better than implicit. Simple is better than complex. Easter Egg >>> import this Copyright This document has been placed in the public domain. The Python Challenge.