Photo reportage

Facebook Twitter

Rob Hornstra photographs changes to Sochi, Russia, in the years leading up to the Olympic Games in “The Sochi Project” with Arnold van Bruggen. With the 2014 Winter Olympic Games kicking off this week, the world will get a fast and likely incomplete introduction to Sochi, Russia.

Rob Hornstra photographs changes to Sochi, Russia, in the years leading up to the Olympic Games in “The Sochi Project” with Arnold van Bruggen.

But for Dutch photographer Rob Hornstra and journalist Arnold van Bruggen, Sochi is familiar territory. They’ve spent the past five years painstakingly reporting on Sochi and the surrounding region, determined to transcend the Olympic glow that now engulfs the city. A look at their expansive work, “The Sochi Project,” fills in the blanks of the city’s story, revealing an incredibly complicated place steeped in history and conflict. “We don't have anything against these games, but we hope if you watch them that you know in general where it's taking place,” Hornstra said. “If you look a little bit farther than the stadium, you'll see different things.

Rob Hornstra/Flatland Gallery Rob Hornstra/Flatland Gallery , Rob Hornstra / Flatland Gallery. Rob Hornstra/Flatland Gallery. Category:BBC. Christmas in Ethiopia’s Highlands, Travelling Beyond Fine Art Photography. The first time I laid eyes on the portrait of a young priest, whom I immediately recognized to be Ethiopian, I was mesmerized.

Christmas in Ethiopia’s Highlands, Travelling Beyond Fine Art Photography

Not only for its scale, standing more than a meter tall, or for the setting, the equally impressive Parisian establishment SOME/THINGS. It was that in this private enclave of creative acumen, old worlds and new could and did meet. That images of Ethiopic traditions, of a so called black byzantine could marry so naturally with avant grade furniture and other artifacts so firmly entrenched in a modern worldy aesthetic. This rare medley, at least within a western context, unexpectedly finding a home in Paris’ 11th arrondissement.

So it was there, that I first discovered the images of Greek photographer, Athina Kazolea. © Athina Kazolea. My conversation with her on this image and the larger body of work that constitutes, Northern Ethiopia The Christian Highlands would come almost a year later. During that first visit she describes that her hair went white. About. Journalism and travel, together at last. The Photographers That Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros Left Behind. Yuri Kozyrev, 47: Chechnya / Kosovo / Afghanistan (held captive in 1992) / Iraq / Bahrain / Egypt / LibyaTyler Hicks, 41: Kosovo / Afghanistan / Iraq / Lebanon / Libya (held captive, with Lynsey Addario, in March) Kozyrev and Hicks were traveling together in Libya in March 2011 when Hicks and Lynsey Addario (slide 2) were captured by Qaddafi’s soldiers.

The Photographers That Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros Left Behind

In the weeks before his friends were captured, Kozyrev says, “it was really, really exciting. But it was not safe to stay there.” Note: Conflicts listed roughly in chronological order of the photographer’s first trip there; many have made multiple trips to certain countries. Photo: Christopher Anderson/Magnum Photos João Silva To donate to his recovery, click here. Chris Hondros In Misurata, Libya, on April 18. Photo: Katie Orlinsky via Getty Images Tim Hetherington (right) Hetherington with Sebastian Junger while making 'Restrepo', their Academy Award-nominated documentary about the Afghan war. Photo: Tim Hetherington Yuri Kozyrev Libya, 2011.

The Big Picture. Analysis & Opinion. New York Times Photojournalism - Photography, Video and Visual Journalism Archives - Lens Blog. In pictures.