Electricity

Facebook Twitter
Cooking With Solar Energy - A Hands-on Project for Students Climate.gov is a good place for teachers to find videos, interactive activities, and lesson plans for teaching about climates and climate change. One of the teaching activities that I found on Climate.gov I think elementary, middle, and high school students could enjoy is making a solar oven (link opens a PDF). The Making a Solar Oven PDF includes directions for building your solar oven and tips for cooking in it. You and your students can build a solar oven using materials that are commonly found in schools, homes, and grocery stores. Applications for Education Making a solar oven and baking some cookies in it could be a great way to get students excited to learn about solar energy. Cooking With Solar Energy - A Hands-on Project for Students
Electron Configuration
Another issue bubbling away at the moment is nuclear power. When it comes to the methods we have developed for generating electricity, all seem to have their upsides and downsides. But there is one type of power generation happening in many places around the world that the Australian government has vowed not to touch. It's called nuclear power. But a poll has just been released saying that half of Australians surveyed want it brought back to the table as an option for the future. Behind the News - 27/10/2009: Nuclear Power Behind the News - 27/10/2009: Nuclear Power
Electricity for Kids - Fun Experiments, Free Games, Cool Projects, Science Online Electricity for Kids - Fun Experiments, Free Games, Cool Projects, Science Online Check out the exciting subject of electricity for kids with our range of fun experiments, free games, cool science fair projects, challenging quizzes, interesting facts, amazing videos, worksheets and more! Learn about circuits, lightning, batteries, conductors and all kinds of interesting electricity topics. As well as activities for children, there are also lesson plans for teachers, ideas for parents and a whole host of free teaching resources for anyone interested in electricity related information and learning about science online.
Electricity
Electricity for Kids 1
Humans have an intimate relationship with electricity, to the point that it's virtually impossible to separate your life from it. Sure, you can flee from the world of crisscrossing power lines and live your life completely off the grid, but even at the loneliest corners of the world, electricity exists. If it's not lighting up the storm clouds overhead or crackling in a static spark at your fingertips, then it's moving through the human nervous system, animating the brain's will in every flourish, breath and unthinking heartbeat. When the same mysterious force energizes a loved one's touch, a stroke of lightning and a George Foreman Grill, a curious duality ensues: We take electricity for granted one second and gawk at its power the next. More than two and a half centuries have passed since Benjamin Franklin and others proved lightning was a form of electricity, but it's still hard not to flinch when a particularly violent flash lights up the horizon. How Electricity Works" How Electricity Works"
Peak Student - Student's Corner
EERE: Kids Home Page
Just For Kids
index index Alliant Energy Kids is designed to teach students important concepts about how energy works, energy resources, conserving energy, and staying safe around energy. Developed for use in 4th and 5th grade classrooms, the educational materials and web activities are free to customers of Alliant Energy and promote energy awareness that will help students make meaningful connections between everyday activities and energy consumption. Educational materials distributed to 4th and 5th grade classrooms in the Alliant Energy service territory in October consist of: The Energy Zone – a twelve-page student resource chock full of valuable information about renewable and nonrenewable energy resources, sustainability and the future of energy, and important energy safety tips.A 20” x 28” classroom poster promoting the key message that each student has the power to make a difference when it comes to conserving energy.
Energy Kids - For Teachers