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Mars 2015

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Dix questions, dix réponses sur le changement climatique. Atacama Desert flooded after 7 years of rain fell in just 12 hours. At least 10 people have been killed by catastrophic floods in northern regions of Chile after thunderstorms brought the equivalent of 7 years of rain in just 12 hours on March 26.

Atacama Desert flooded after 7 years of rain fell in just 12 hours

Search and rescue operations are still in progress and authorities fear the number of casualties will rise. Flooding has affected the regions of Atacama, Antofagasta and Coquimbo, all located in the Atacama Desert, one of the driest regions of the world. Heavy rainfall and consequent river overflow, flash floods and landslides knocked out power and communication lines, destroyed infrastructure and made roadways impassable. Arctic ice melt sets yet another record. Turns out the world’s first “clean coal” plant is a backdoor subsidy to oil producers. CLER - Base de données documentaires. CONCOURS DE POESIE : Un haiku pour le climat Mettez votre énergie créatrice et votre amour des mots au service de la sobriété énergétique et de l'environnement !

CLER - Base de données documentaires

L'année 2015 sera marquée par la transition énergétique et la lutte contre les changements climatiques... Alors que se prépare en France l'organisation en décembre de la conférence Paris Climat 2015 et dans le cadre du Printemps des poètes, le CLER lance un grand concours de HAIKUS sur le thème de l'énergie et du climat. Le 17ème Printemps des Poètes nous propose cette année le thème de l'insurrection poétique, occasion de nous révolter contre les bouleversements climatiques en cours, et de nous soulever contre le système énergétique actuel, avec pour arme la poésie. Le dieu pétrole dévore le Canada, par Nancy Huston. Watch us explain ocean acidification with a soda maker.

A second giant blob of Antarctic ice is getting ready to drown us. Remember when we found out last year that the West Antarctic ice sheet had started to collapse, that the collapse more or less can’t be stopped, and that it will eventually result in 10 to 15 feet of sea-level rise?

A second giant blob of Antarctic ice is getting ready to drown us

Now we have some more bad news of that caliber. An enormous glacier, one on the other side of the continent from the ailing ice sheet, is doing pretty much the same thing, researchers have discovered. Chris Mooney reports for The Washington Post: The findings about East Antarctica emerge from a new paper just out in Nature Geoscience by an international team of scientists representing the United States, Britain, France, and Australia.

They flew a number of research flights over the Totten Glacier of East Antarctica — the fastest-thinning sector of the world’s largest ice sheet — and took a variety of measurements to try to figure out the reasons behind its retreat. Vanuatu’s president blames climate change for Cyclone Pam. This story was originally published by The Guardian and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.

Vanuatu’s president blames climate change for Cyclone Pam

The president of Vanuatu says climate change is contributing to more extreme weather conditions and cyclone seasons, after cyclone Pam ripped through the island nation. The damage from the Category 5 storm to the island nation has been extensive, and is still being assessed as aid workers scrambled to get to affected areas on Monday morning. The official death toll remains at six, with many more injured, and is expected to rise as communication begins to be restored.

Vanuatu’s president, Baldwin Lonsdale, spoke at a United Nations world conference in Sendai, Japan, on March 16, and said the storm was a major setback for the people, virtually wiping out Vanuatu’s development. “This is a very devastating cyclone … I term it a monster that has hit Vanuatu,” he said. Vanuatu's president blames climate change for extreme weather.

The president of Vanuatu says climate change is contributing to more extreme weather conditions and cyclone seasons, after cyclone Pam ripped through the island nation.

Vanuatu's president blames climate change for extreme weather

The damage from the category five storm to the island nation has been extensive, and is still being assessed as aid workers scrambled to get to affected areas on Monday morning. The official death toll remains at six, with many more injured, and is expected to rise as communication begins to be restored. Vanuatu’s president, Baldwin Lonsdale, spoke at a United Nations world conference in Sendai, Japan, on Monday, and said the storm was a major setback for the people, virtually wiping out Vanuatu’s development.

“This is a very devastating cyclone … I term it a monster that has hit Vanuatu,” he said. “It is a setback for the government and for the people of Vanuatu … All the development that has taken place has been wiped out.” Climate change is baking Alaska. Something does seem to be going on in Alaska.

Climate change is baking Alaska

Last fall, a skipjack tuna, which is more likely to be found in the Galápagos than near a glacier, was caught about 150 miles southeast of Anchorage, not far from the Kenai. This past weekend, race organizers had to truck in snow to the ceremonial Iditarod start line in Anchorage. Sen. Italy sets new world one-day snowfall record. Capracotta and Pescocostanzo, between Abruzzo and Molise in central Italy are officially the snowiest places in the world, Meteoweb.eu writes.

Italy sets new world one-day snowfall record

While Capracotta, in the province of Isernia, has set the new world one-day snowfall record with 256 cm (8.34 feet) of snow in about 18 hours on Thursday, March 5, 2015, Pescocostanzo measured almost equally impressive 240 cm (7.84 feet). The previous world one-day snowfall record was set in Silver Lake, Colorado, US when 193 cm (6.33 feet) of snow fell between April 20 to 21, 1921. Capracotta, Itally. March 2015. Telerama-FPLP.pdf. Climate change is messing with leaves, and leaves are messing back. Even Europe isn’t doing enough to meet its climate goals. Europe isn’t doing enough to fight climate change, according to a report out today from the European Environment Agency — and that’s bad news for all of the less ambitious nations out there.

Even Europe isn’t doing enough to meet its climate goals

While the European Union is on track to meet its 2020 climate goals, it’s not in a good position to continue on after that to meet its 2050 goals, the report found. The E.U. is also falling short on many other sustainability goals. From Reuters: The Copenhagen-based EEA said Europe — backed by some of the toughest environmental legislation in the world — had improved air and water quality, cut greenhouse gas emissions and raised waste recycling in recent years. The E.U. aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 80 to 95 percent by 2050. Of particular challenge to Europe is transportation, which accounts for a quarter of its greenhouse gas emissions. This all comes a week after the European Commission released its vision for a U.N. climate pact to be hammered out in Paris in December. Chai Jing's review: Under the Dome – Investigating China’s Haze 柴静雾霾调查:穹顶之下. «Sous le dôme», le film sur la pollution qui secoue la Chine.

C’est un événement sans précédent qui s’est produit ce week-end en Chine.

«Sous le dôme», le film sur la pollution qui secoue la Chine

Un documentaire sur la pollution atmosphérique, présenté par la célèbre journaliste Chai Jing, s’est propagé sur les réseaux sociaux chinois, et tout le monde en parle depuis, de l’infirmière au chauffeur de taxi en passant par les voisins dans l’ascenseur.