Arab spring support by Anons

Facebook Twitter

Arab Spring. Anonymous | Syrian Revolution. 505609231. Wikileaks 08TUNIS679. Viewing cable 08TUNIS679, CORRUPTION IN TUNISIA: WHAT'S YOURS IS MINE Understanding cables Every cable message consists of three parts: The top box shows each cables unique reference number, when and by whom it originally was sent, and what its initial classification was.The middle box contains the header information that is associated with the cable.

wikileaks 08TUNIS679

It includes information about the receiver(s) as well as a general subject.The bottom box presents the body of the cable. The opening can contain a more specific subject, references to other cables (browse by origin to find them) or additional comment. This is followed by the main contents of the cable: a summary, a collection of specific topics and a comment section. We wrote a counter-script that strips the governments script. Anonymous switches its sights to Operation Algeria. Anonymous Press Release: A Warning Message to the Algerian Government. Social Networks, Social Revolution. and Anonymous (Al Jazeera Empire) [www.keepvid.com].mp4. Anonymous Hackers Attack Yemeni Government - Gawker.

Here's my problem with crediting these attacks to Anonymous.

Anonymous Hackers Attack Yemeni Government - Gawker

Firstly, all activist hackers who launch these attacks are (lower case a) anonymous for obvious reasons, and don't self-identify because they're attacking governments. There are dozens of reasons for these attacks by independents who don't identify as Anonymous, and accepting these attacks as the work of Anonymous isn't credible because really, in any contentious attack where the perpetrator wouldn't want to claim credit, Anonymous could be cited or claim credit because they are a nameless hivemind.

I have no issue with these attacks in principle, and no practical issue with much of what Anonymous does, but I'm afraid they are becoming far too broadly interpreted by the media as this ultimate nexus of activist hackers. Tunisian protests turn into cyberwar between government and hacker group. Violent protests in Tunisia have turned into a cyberwar between government forces and the Anonymous hacker group, after Gmail, Facebook, Yahoo and Hotmail accounts of perceived dissidents were censored.

Tunisian protests turn into cyberwar between government and hacker group

On Dec. 18, a group of youths gathered in Sidi Bouzid in Tunisia, protesting against unemployment and poor living conditions. The government cracked down, forcing discussion to move online through social networking forums. "The authorities appear to have turned to even more repressive tactics to silence reporting. In the case of Internet bloggers, this includes what seems a remarkably invasive and technically sophisticated plan to steal passwords from the country's own citizens, in order to spy on private communications and squelch online speech," said Danny O'Brien, in a blog on the website run by Internet Advocacy Coordinator at Committee to Protect Journalists.

2 new Anon Operations promote net freedom in US, Tunisia. It appears that Anonymous, the vigilante internet freedom-fighting group that rose to fame with their WikiLeaks-defending DDoS attacks, are still busy gathering support for their latest missions despite increasing legal issues involving the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and international law enforcement agencies.

2 new Anon Operations promote net freedom in US, Tunisia

Anonymous members and supporters are currently rallying support for two new missions: Operation Bling and Operation Tunisia. For Operation Tunisia, the group gathered over 9,000 people online Sunday to protest government censorship of websites, including WikiLeaks, and the mission, which has resulted in a “near blackout” of the nation’s government sites, appears to be ongoing. An-open-letter-to-all-media.