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Study finds potential solution for feeding, swallowing difficulties in children with autism. (Press-News.org) WASHINGTON (Feb. 19, 2014) — Collaborative research out of the George Washington University (GW) reveals new information on the pathogenesis of feeding and swallowing difficulties often found in children with neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism and intellectual disability.

Study finds potential solution for feeding, swallowing difficulties in children with autism

Using an animal model of DiGeorge/22q11 Deletion Syndrome, a genetic disorder that causes autism and intellectual disability, the GW group found clear signs of early feeding and swallowing disruption, and underlying changes in brain development. The research, featured on the cover of Disease Models & Mechanisms, may even lead to a cure for these difficulties — known as pediatric dysphagia. Up to 80 percent of children with developmental disorders have difficulty ingesting, chewing, or swallowing food, leading to food aspiration, choking, or life-threatening respiratory infections.

"A lot of children with pediatric dysphagia tend to be sicker from birth onward. West Orange, NJ. No way? GW Researchers Receive $6.2Mil Program Project Grant from the NIH to Research Pediatric Dysphagia. WASHINGTON (March 17, 2015) — An interdisciplinary group of researchers from the George Washington University (GW) School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS) and Children’s National Health System (Children’s National) has been awarded a program project grant (PPG) for $6.2 million from The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) to solve pediatric dysphagia — a chronic difficulty with feeding and swallowing in children.

GW Researchers Receive $6.2Mil Program Project Grant from the NIH to Research Pediatric Dysphagia

“Our combined expertise in circuit function, cranial and facial development, and genetics, along with our ability to creatively come together, and strong institutional support, makes this team the ideal group to meet this challenge,” said Anthony-Samuel LaMantia, Ph.D., director of the GW Institute for Neurosciences and professor of pharmacology and physiology at SMHS. “Working together over the last several years, we have become incredibly committed to solving this major clinical issue and biological mystery.” Study Finds Potential Solution for Feeding, Swallowing Difficulties in Children with DiGeorge Syndrome, Autism. WASHINGTON (Feb. 19, 2014) — Collaborative research out of the George Washington University (GW) reveals new information on the pathogenesis of feeding and swallowing difficulties often found in children with neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism and intellectual disability.

Study Finds Potential Solution for Feeding, Swallowing Difficulties in Children with DiGeorge Syndrome, Autism

Using an animal model of DiGeorge/22q11 Deletion Syndrome, a genetic disorder that causes autism and intellectual disability, the GW group found clear signs of early feeding and swallowing disruption, and underlying changes in brain development. The research, featured on the cover of Disease Models & Mechanisms, may even lead to a cure for these difficulties — known as pediatric dysphagia. Up to 80 percent of children with developmental disorders have difficulty ingesting, chewing, or swallowing food, leading to food aspiration, choking, or life-threatening respiratory infections.

Despite its high co-incidence with developmental disorders, little was previously known about pediatric dysphagia. Superbugs could be defeated by fecal transplantation. Fecal transplants in mice cleared K. pneumoniae in the intestines.

Superbugs could be defeated by fecal transplantation

In humans, stool transplants have been effective against C. difficile. The study in mice has been published in PLOS Pathogens. It investigated the interactions between vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) and multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in the intestinal environment. Dr. Eric Pamer, from the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, NY, and colleagues used a mouse model of intestinal colonization to test whether intestinal domination by either VRE or K. pneumoniae would offer resistance against colonization by the other pathogen.

The two pathogens together account for around 10% of serious hospital-acquired infections in the US. Fecal transplantation from healthy human donors has so far been found to be particularly effective for treating Clostridium difficile infection. What is periodontitis? What causes periodontitis? Periodontitis means "inflammation around the tooth" - it is a serious gum infection that damages the soft tissue and bone that supports the tooth.

What is periodontitis? What causes periodontitis?

All periodontal diseases, including periodontitis, are infections which affect the periodontium. The periodontium are the tissues around a tooth, tissues that support the tooth. With periodontitis, the alveolar bone around the teeth is slowly and progressively lost. Microorganisms, such as bacteria, stick to the surface of the tooth and multiply - an overactive immune system reacts with inflammation. Untreated periodontitis will eventually result in tooth loss, and may increase the risk of stroke, heart attack and other health problems. What is the difference between periodontitis and gingivitis? Gingivitis occurs before periodontitis. What are the signs and symptoms of periodontitis A symptom is something we feel and describe to the doctor, while a sign is something others, including the doctor can see.