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What's on the 6th floor?: Guest Blogger - John A. Martini: Researching Sutro Baths. The San Francisco History Center is pleased to present historian John A.

What's on the 6th floor?: Guest Blogger - John A. Martini: Researching Sutro Baths

Martini speaking about his newest book, Sutro's Glass Palace on Saturday, March 15 at 10:30am in the Latino/Hispanic Community Meeting Room at the Main Library. As a special treat, Mr. Martini has written a guest blog post for "What's On the 6th Floor" about writing his book and researching Sutro Baths at the San Francisco History Center. Researching Sutro Baths The ruins of Sutro Baths near the Cliff House are an iconic San Francisco landmark. When I began writing my book Sutro’s Glass Palace: The Story of Sutro Baths I was surprised how little had been written about the vanished structure. To my delight, the collections of the San Francisco History Center proved to be a priceless source of primary information about Adolph Sutro’s grand palace. Most valuable, though, were the original drawings and blueprints of the Baths, some dating back to the 1880s (SFPL BP-49). Survive, Prosper and Thrive: San Francisco’s Historic Cliff House - San Francisco Bay Times.

Like San Francisco and the LGBT community itself, the Cliff House is a survivor.

Survive, Prosper and Thrive: San Francisco’s Historic Cliff House - San Francisco Bay Times

It has overcome natural disasters, establishment threats to its free spirited ways and many other challenges. If the Cliff House has a theme song, surely it is the Gloria Gaynor disco anthem, “I Will Survive.” 2016 marks the centennial of the National Park Service (NPS) and thanks to the LGBTQ Heritage Initiative, there is renewed emphasis on identifying and celebrating places and important events associated with our community for inclusion in the parks and programs of the NPS. Thus far, The Stonewall Inn in New York and Chicago’s Henry Gerber House (birthplace of the first gay civil rights organization in the nation, The Society for Human Rights) are now designated as National Historic Landmarks.

Chabot

Local Brewing Co. PROXY. Untitled. 25 free things to do in San Francisco. For an all-timer city, San Francisco quietly delivers a lot for the money.

25 free things to do in San Francisco

Many of its hotels offer comfort and location for a third of the cost of a comparable New York or London hotel; public transit is part of the fun (cheaper Market Street vintage street cars are more fun than the famous cable cars), and for food you can’t beat a $4 burrito in the Mission. And so much of the fun in San Francisco is free. Here's a list of 25 options: 1. Amoeba Music’s free shows When I lived in San Francisco, I spent at least a couple hours a week at Amoeba Music, a huge record/CD store made out of a former bowling alley on Haight Street. 2. San Francisco's home-grown beer - and call it simply 'Anchor' not 'Anchor Steam' to sound like a local - offers free 45-minute tours of its historic facilities and shiny copper brewhouse. 3. San Francisco overflows with wild, unexpected art shows at dozens of galleries that are free to visit. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

The Best Brunches in San Francisco - Where to Boozy Brunch in The Mission, Marina, Castro and Other Neighborhoods - Thrillist SF. If there's one thing that unites all San Franciscans -- whether they're engineers or baristas, hipsters or Marina bros, gays, straights, and everything in-between (except that one lady who married a bridge, that's weird) -- it's bottomless brunch.

The Best Brunches in San Francisco - Where to Boozy Brunch in The Mission, Marina, Castro and Other Neighborhoods - Thrillist SF

To make sure you never miss out on one ever again (even if you're in... Sea Cliff?!?) , we've kindly assembled all 58 bottomless boozy brunches available in our fair 7x7. The 7 best breakfast sandwiches in SF Barracuda 2251 Market St The Deal: 11 clams for bottomless mimosas. Bisou Bistro 2367 Market St The Deal: Bottomless mimosas and Bloody Marys for $12 on weekends, and Friday from 1130a-3p for those of you "working from home". Kitchen Story 3499 16th St The Deal: $16 for all-you-can-drink mimosas made with fresh OJ, every freaking day from 8a-3p.

Blush! SliderBar 2295 Market St The Deal: Your choice of bottomless sangrias, Micheladas, or mimosas for $12.95. A waffle to end all waffles: The Maple-Bacon-Egg. Market Street Prototyping Festival. History of San Francisco Place Names. San Francisco's 16 Greatest Infamous Local Legends: SFist. SF is a city that, historically, worships its kooks.

San Francisco's 16 Greatest Infamous Local Legends: SFist

And when it comes to the infamous — either because of their oddity or their crimes — we have no shortage. Undoubtedly there are more local legends that some of you would add to this list, and feel free. But bear in mind, these are people we love (or fear) because their stories are infamously funny, sordid, or zany, and because they contribute to our colorful historical fabric, not because they necessarily contributed anything to society. Carol Doda Carol Doda If you were a heterosexual man in North Beach in the 1960s and 70s, you were probably there to see Carol Doda.