background preloader

Newsletter Articles

Facebook Twitter

What Would Happen If Students Assigned Their Own Math Homework? Is homework worthwhile?

What Would Happen If Students Assigned Their Own Math Homework?

Does doing it make a difference in learning? These questions are the source of much debate nowadays. Some may say homework is good practice, and practice makes perfect. Others insist homework is unproductive and pointless. What benefit is there in doing 20 of the same type of math problem? What if homework could be a means for promoting self-efficacy, agency, and motivation to learn? In this light, the following option for math homework was born. The “What I May Need… What I Loved…” Math Investigation The “What I May Need…What I Loved…” math investigation below was crafted out of a desire to teach students that learning requires a personal commitment, in class and at home. In this assignment, students choose to focus on either an area they didn’t fully understand or something they found interesting or engaging.

Making This Homework Option Work 1. No paradigm shift will work without some personal investment. 2. How Kids Benefit From Learning To Explain Their Math Thinking. Math teachers of older students sometimes struggle to get students to explain their thinking with evidence.

How Kids Benefit From Learning To Explain Their Math Thinking

It’s hard to get kids in the habit of talking about how they are thinking about a problem when they’ve had many years of instruction that focused on getting the “right answer.” That’s why educators are now trying to get students in the habit of explaining their thinking at a young age. The Teaching Channel captured kindergarten and first grade teachers pushing students to give evidence for their answers in situations where there are several ways to think about a problem. Pattern recognition is a fundamental part of mathematics and kindergarteners are not too young to notice, compare and describe simple patterns.

In this video, kindergarten teacher Donella Oleston describes how she had to back up and explain to these young learners what it means to “explain your thinking,” because at first students would only answer, “My brain told me so.” Katrina Schwartz. OPINION: It’s time to stop the clock on math anxiety. Here’s the latest research on how. Our future depends on mathematical thinking, but math trauma extends across our country – and the world – due to the ineffective ways the subject is often taught in classrooms, as a narrow set of procedures that students are expected to reproduce at high speed.

OPINION: It’s time to stop the clock on math anxiety. Here’s the latest research on how

In a newly published paper, researchers showed not only that math anxiety was negatively related to performance in 63 of the 64 countries tested in the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA), but also that the highest achieving students had the most striking negative relationship between math anxiety and performance. Watch Jo Boaler’s presentation at the 2017 NCSM conference Unfortunately math continues to be taught in ways that are far removed from the research evidence on ways to teach well, and many ineffective classroom practices – timed tests, speed pressure, procedural teaching – are the reasons for the vast numbers of children and adults with math anxiety.

First, math is often taught as a performance subject. Preparing and Planning: How I Get Ready for Teaching a Math Lesson. A friend who is a house painter told me that he spends most of the time getting ready before painting―cleaning, sanding, taping, spackling, priming, etc.

Preparing and Planning: How I Get Ready for Teaching a Math Lesson

If you do all the preparation with care, he explained, then the actual painting goes smoothly. I think the same is true for teaching. For many years, I’ve written vignettes that describe how lessons I’ve taught have unfolded in classrooms. My goal has been to bring lessons to life so others could try them. But the vignettes typically haven’t revealed all that I had to do before teaching the lesson. This is my first attempt at writing from this perspective. Preparing and Planning―Both Essential Before a LessonThe thinking I do when teaching something new falls into two categories: preparing and planning. Math Teachers Should Encourage Their Students to Count Using Their Fingers in Class - The Atlantic. A few weeks ago I (Jo Boaler) was working in my Stanford office when the silence of the room was interrupted by a phone call.

Math Teachers Should Encourage Their Students to Count Using Their Fingers in Class - The Atlantic

A mother called me to report that her 5-year-old daughter had come home from school crying because her teacher had not allowed her to count on her fingers. This is not an isolated event—schools across the country regularly ban finger use in classrooms or communicate to students that they are babyish. This is despite a compelling and rather surprising branch of neuroscience that shows the importance of an area of our brain that “sees” fingers, well beyond the time and age that people use their fingers to count.

In a study published last year, the researchers Ilaria Berteletti and James R. Booth analyzed a specific region of our brain that is dedicated to the perception and representation of fingers known as the somatosensory finger area. Nctm formative assessment part 1. WSJ A002 20161022. Why Math Education in the U.S. Doesn't Add Up. In December the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) will announce the latest results from the tests it administers every three years to hundreds of thousands of 15-year-olds around the world.

Why Math Education in the U.S. Doesn't Add Up

In the last round, the U.S. posted average scores in reading and science but performed well below other developed nations in math, ranking 36 out of 65 countries. We do not expect this year's results to be much different. Our nation's scores have been consistently lackluster. Fortunately, though, the 2012 exam collected a unique set of data on how the world's students think about math. The insights from that study, combined with important new findings in brain science, reveal a clear strategy to help the U.S. catch up.

The PISA 2012 assessment questioned not only students' knowledge of mathematics but also their approach to the subject, and their responses reflected three distinct learning styles.