background preloader

Teaching with iPad

Facebook Twitter

Using iPads in Education: Resources for teachers using iPads in the classroom. Getting ready for iPad deployment: ten things I’d wish I’d known about last year « darrencoxon.net. Classroom iPod touches & iPads: Dos and Don'ts. Do delete content.

Classroom iPod touches & iPads: Dos and Don'ts

Since you are mirroring the computer's iTunes Library onto the iPods, deleting items from iTunes will delete them from the iPods. After you no longer have a need for a podcast, video, or audiobook, delete it so it is not taking up room and cluttering up the iPods. Chances are you want to use this content with a future class. If it's something you will use again, drag and drop it into a folder on your desktop. You can drag and drop it back into iTunes for the next time you want it synced to iPods. An introductory guide to iPads for Teachers.

I’m delivering some iPad training to a school tomorrow, so thought it might be useful to collate some of the links I’ve been putting together for the session.

An introductory guide to iPads for Teachers

The session is concentrating mainly on teachers using the iPads for their own professional use, rather than being used as a classroom resource, but a lot of the apps below will be suitable for use by students too. I’ll do another post sometime of great apps for different subject areas. Here’s some of the useful apps I’d recommend investigating. Some are free, others the price of a pint or so. Links are to the UK version of iTunes so other readers may need to do a search in the App Store to find the version for their region. File storage / Transfer Dropbox Dropbox is probably one of the most useful applications I’ve used in years. Other apps also work with Dropbox too.

Word Processing / Office Capability. iPad in Education. On note-taking on an iPad. I’ve been doing most of my work on an iPad for a couple of months now, and have finally come up with a workflow that fits how I do things.

on note-taking on an iPad

I had initially been typing notes directly into Evernote, which is awesome and extremely useful, but the flow of notes felt entirely too linear. I tend to wander a bit, and come back to things later. Typing notes into a document felt too constraining. So, I went hunting for apps that would replace my traditional moleskine notebooks. I’ve got a stack of notebooks at home, and have been extremely happy with how I work with them. How to have the best parts of freeform note-taking, while being able to easily search, index, and share content?

I was sure Penultimate would do the trick, but it didn’t feel right. Then, talking with a prof, and she recommended Noteshelf. I had a bit of a holy crap moment the other day, in a vendor demo. Yes. iPads can’t improve learning without good teaching Pt 1. Clearly there is a lot of buzz around iPads in schools at the moment.

iPads can’t improve learning without good teaching Pt 1

You can’t log on to the Web without reading about another school or entire district or department investing massive coin in a sparkling set of the Wonder Tablets, excited that they will cure all the ills of the current education systems around the world. From reading my blog, you would be no doubt convinced that I am very much in this Pro-iPad camp. Make no mistake I am.

However, no matter how versatile and potentially powerful a product the iPad is, it is merely an extremely expensive placemat without creative, well planned teaching behind its use. Before committing to an iPad implementation of any size, schools need to thoroughly think through how these technological marvels are going to enhance the teaching and learning process. Its about Teaching and Learning, not iPads The kind of shift in learning the iPad (and other tablets) can initiate is dependent on good teaching practice and preparation. 18 Enlightening iPad Experiments in Education. You know from experience that when you enjoy a subject, learning about that subject is easier, more fun, and you retain the information longer.

18 Enlightening iPad Experiments in Education

Getting kids to enjoy learning is more productive to education efforts than spending more money, lengthening school days, you name it. This is the reason many educators are excited about the possibilities inherent to the iPad. More than 600 school districts in America have brought iPads into the classroom. Had they waited a bit longer, they could have taken advantage of studies like these to know whether the iPad movement is the wave of the future of education, or a waste of valuable resources. iPads can’t improve learning without good teaching Pt 2 – Writing. Used with permission from Debbie Ridpath Ohi at Inkygirl.com ( ) Writing and technology has been a controversial subject for many traditionalists in education.

“Spell check stops children from learning to spell”. “All students do today is copy and paste from Wikipedia and Google searched articles.” ” Children need to handwrite all their drafts”. “William Shakespeare didn’t have a laptop” ( OK, i just threw that in for fun!) At the same time, of course, as a teacher I have been subjected to countless reports and stories typed in ridiculous unreadable coloured fonts, decorated with superfluous clip art and WordArt headings and thousands of “death by Powerpoints” unnecessarily printed out to hand up to me. 20 years of computers as a publishing tool has not necessarily improved the standard of students’ writing skills.