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Butters Stotch - Wikipedia. Leopold "Butters" Stotch is a fictional character in the animated television series South Park.

Butters Stotch - Wikipedia

He is voiced by series co-creator Matt Stone and loosely based on co-producer & animation director Eric Stough.[1] He is a third- then fourth-grade student at the fictional South Park Elementary School. Butters is depicted as more cheerful, naive, optimistic, gullible, and passive compared to the show's other child characters and can become increasingly anxious, especially when faced with the likelihood of being punished, which is usually just being grounded, of which he is extremely terrified.

As a result, he is often sheltered and unknowledgeable of some of the suggestive content his peers understand. His name is a play on the confection butterscotch. Role in South Park[edit] Butters as his evil alter ego "Professor Chaos" As a result, Butters vengefully adopted the alter ego of Professor Chaos. Character[edit] Creation and design[edit] Development[edit] Personality and traits[edit] Notes[edit] 'South Park' Season 20 Finale Recap - 'South Park' Ends Season 20 by Admitting Defeat. When South Park concluded its 19th season nearly a year ago to the day, the world was a strikingly different place.

'South Park' Season 20 Finale Recap - 'South Park' Ends Season 20 by Admitting Defeat

Yes, the United States was in the early stages of what would become a crushing election, but our political follies had not yet distracted the country from concrete issues. Following San Bernardino and Colorado Springs, guns were terrorizing the U.S. as well as the little cartoon town. ISIS was a faceless, looming nightmare. A former reality TV star was making a mockery of the Republican Party and providing great material for comedians. Gentrification was changing the shape of our cities, and PC culture was annoying as hell. Advertisement - Continue Reading Below By September 14, when South Park premiered its historic 20th season, the only topic of interest in this country was the presidential election. Imagine being South Park creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone in this situation. South Park has survived for 20 seasons by making chaos out of our imperfect reality.

South Park Has Finally Accepted Donald Trump As President in Episode 7. It took a while to sink in, and maybe not everyone is there yet, but Donald Trump has been elected President of the United States.

South Park Has Finally Accepted Donald Trump As President in Episode 7

Last week, the results of the election stunned the country, South Park included, with Trump's victory throwing the show into an uncharacteristic stupor. Now, the show has accepted the reality of our new President-elect, and like Trump himself, South Park has no idea what to do next. Advertisement - Continue Reading Below As I said last week, the absurdity of our country's real-life predicament might have broken South Park. Finding a way to satirize the country embracing racist rhetoric under the leadership of an unqualified buffoon is not only difficult, but it feels almost wrong, like mocking a national tragedy.

South Park Presidential Debates: Season 20 Takes on Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton in Episode Three. Mr.

South Park Presidential Debates: Season 20 Takes on Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton in Episode Three

Garrison—South Park's over-tanned Donald Trump surrogate—is a man unfit to be president. Yet, somehow he's the only one who realizes that he has none of the ethical values, personality traits, or basic knowledge of U.S. government to complete even the simplest requirements of the job. ‘South Park’ Creators on Trump and Hillary: ‘The Giant Douche and the Turd Sandwich’ Before season 20 of ‘South Park’ kicks off this month, Trey Parker and Matt Stone tell us what they have planned for Hillary and Trump.

‘South Park’ Creators on Trump and Hillary: ‘The Giant Douche and the Turd Sandwich’

This month, South Park will begin its 20th season on the air. And creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone are in a celebratory mood. The pair made a rare appearance at Comic-Con earlier this summer and on the night of September 1st, they stopped by The Paley Center in Beverly Hills for the opening of a new interactive exhibit called “The South Park 20 Experience.” To mark the occasion, Comedy Central also released a new retrospective video that looks back at the show’s 19 seasons, by the numbers, and cites milestones like 49 Cartman dumps, 84 Stan vomits, and one Gay Fish. “The first time we saw that we were sitting in front of a bunch of people at Comic-Con,” Parker tells The Daily Beast before sitting down with Stone for a panel discussion moderated by Viacom chief Doug Herzog, who helped bring the show to Comedy Central in the mid-’90s. Comedy Central. South Park rips Alec Baldwin apart in a scathing parody.

Comedy Central’s “South Park” kicked off its 17th season on Wednesday night, picking the shadowy NSA and overly excitable Alec Baldwin as its first lampoon-worthy targets of the year.

South Park rips Alec Baldwin apart in a scathing parody

In the episode, Cartman seeks to expose the NSA’s surveillance program and stumbles upon “Shitter,” a next-generation social media tool that plugs one’s thoughts directly to the Internet. What better spokesperson for such a product than the uncontrolled rage-tweeter, Alec Baldwin (voiced by SNL alumnus Bill Hader)? “Hello, I’m Alec Baldwin, and I love social media. But sometimes, I accidentally tweet things that are mean or homophobic,” begins Baldwin’s commercial. “I don’t think that way — I just type that way. Baldwin then cuts off his thumbs. Enter: the Shitter device. World War Zimmerman (Season 17, Episode 3. Turn to the left sometimes. The TSA Gets Involved in Private Matters.

South Park Funny Moments. Toilet Safety Administration ''I'm a Big Boy''