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"A 'Time Machine' That Moves Greater Than Speed of Light Allowing It to Travel Back and Forward in Time" - The Daily Galaxy. After some serious number crunching, a University of British Columbia researcher has come up with a mathematical model for a viable time machine --a bubble of space-time geometry which carries its contents backward and forwards through space and time as it tours a large circular path.

"A 'Time Machine' That Moves Greater Than Speed of Light Allowing It to Travel Back and Forward in Time" - The Daily Galaxy

The bubble moves through space-time at speeds greater than the speed of light at times, allowing it to move backward in time. Ben Tippett, a mathematics and physics instructor, whose field of expertise is Einstein's theory of general relativity, studies black holes and science fiction when he's not teaching. Using math and physics, he has created a formula that describes a method for time travel. "People think of time travel as something as fiction," says Tippett.

"And we tend to think it's not possible because we don't actually do it. Simulation suggests 68 percent of the universe may not actually exist. According to the Lambda Cold Dark Matter (Lambda-CDM) model, which is the current accepted standard for how the universe began and evolved, the ordinary matter we encounter every day only makes up around five percent of the universe's density, with dark matter comprising 27 percent, and the remaining 68 percent made up of dark energy, a so-far theoretical force driving the expansion of the universe.

Simulation suggests 68 percent of the universe may not actually exist

But a new study has questioned whether dark energy exists at all, citing computer simulations that found that by accounting for the changing structure of the cosmos, the gap in the theory, which dark energy was proposed to fill, vanishes. Published in 1915, Einstein's general theory of relativity forms the basis for the accepted origin story of the universe, which says that the Big Bang kicked off the expansion of the universe about 13.8 billion years ago. Dark energy has never been directly observed, and can only be studied through its effects on other objects. View gallery - 2 images. Mind-Blowing New Theory Connects Black Holes, Dark Matter, and Gravitational Waves.

Astronomers Have a Plan to Slow Down a Spacecraft When it Gets to Our Neighboring Star. Planetary Habitability Laboratory/University of Puerto Rico at Arecibo The Breakthrough Starshot Initiative, announced by billionaire Yuri Milner last April with support from Stephen Hawking and Mark Zuckerberg, proposes to send a tiny spacecraft to the Alpha Centauri system, our closest neighboring stars.

Astronomers Have a Plan to Slow Down a Spacecraft When it Gets to Our Neighboring Star

Frontier of Physics: Interactive Map. “Ever since the dawn of civilization,” Stephen Hawking wrote in his international bestseller A Brief History of Time, “people have not been content to see events as unconnected and inexplicable.

Frontier of Physics: Interactive Map

They have craved an understanding of the underlying order in the world.” In the quest for a unified, coherent description of all of nature — a “theory of everything” — physicists have unearthed the taproots linking ever more disparate phenomena. With the law of universal gravitation, Isaac Newton wedded the fall of an apple to the orbits of the planets. Albert Einstein, in his theory of relativity, wove space and time into a single fabric, and showed how apples and planets fall along the fabric’s curves. And today, all known elementary particles plug neatly into a mathematical structure called the Standard Model. Huffingtonpost.

'Nuclear Pasta' in Neutron Stars: New Type of Matter Found. A rare state of matter dubbed "nuclear pasta" appears to exist only inside ultra-dense objects called neutron stars, astronomers say.

'Nuclear Pasta' in Neutron Stars: New Type of Matter Found

There, the nuclei of atoms get crammed together so tightly that they arrange themselves in patterns akin to pasta shapes — some in flat sheets like lasagna and others in spirals like fusilli. And these formations are likely responsible for limiting the maximum rotation speed of these stars, according to a new study. "Such conditions are only reached in neutron stars, the most dense objects in the universe besides black holes," said astronomer José Pons of Alicante University in Spain. [The Top 10 Star Mysteries Ever] This new phase of matter had been proposed by theorists years ago, but was never experimentally verified. Star Quiz: Test Your Stellar Smarts Though they look serene and silent from our vantage on Earth, stars are actually roiling balls of violent plasma.

Alexander B Fry – On dark matter. I’m sitting at my desk at the University of Washington trying to conserve energy.

Alexander B Fry – On dark matter

It isn’t me who's losing it; it’s my computer simulations. Actually, colleagues down the hall might say I was losing it as well. When I tell people I’m working on speculative theories about dark matter, they start to speculate about me. I don’t think everyone who works in the building even believes in it. In presentations, I point out how many cosmological puzzles it helps to solve. Mosh Pit Math: Physicists Analyze Rowdy Crowd.

Hide captionFans in the mosh pit during the performance of Liturgy at the 2012 Pitchfork Music Festival in Union Park, Chicago, on July 14, 2012.

Mosh Pit Math: Physicists Analyze Rowdy Crowd

Roger Kisby/Getty Images Fans in the mosh pit during the performance of Liturgy at the 2012 Pitchfork Music Festival in Union Park, Chicago, on July 14, 2012. Physics and heavy metal don't seem to have a lot in common, but Matt Bierbaum and Jesse Silverberg have found a connection. Both are graduate students at Cornell University. They're also metal heads who enjoy going to concerts and hurling themselves into mosh pits full of like-minded fans. About five years ago Silverberg took his girlfriend to her first gig. LHC proton-lead collisions may have created new form of matter. In September, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was being tuned to enable it to study proton-lead nucleus collisions for a data run next year.

LHC proton-lead collisions may have created new form of matter

Eventually it ran and data was collected on the collisions for a period of four hours. When the data was analyzed, it revealed that some particle pairs produced in the collision were traveling in the same direction – a highly unusual situation. Dark Matter Direct Detection Experiments. The hiding spots for the particles making up dark matter are narrowing, and the answer to this cosmic mystery could come within the next three or four years, scientists say.

Dark Matter Direct Detection Experiments

Dark matter is an elusive substance that is invisible and almost never detected, except by its gravitational pull. Www.nada.kth.se/~asa/dysonFAQ.html. What is a Dyson Sphere?

www.nada.kth.se/~asa/dysonFAQ.html

Science & God: Will Biology, Astronomy, Physics Rule Out Existence Of Deity? By: Natalie Wolchover Published: 09/18/2012 07:59 AM EDT on Lifes Little Mysteries Over the past few centuries, science can be said to have gradually chipped away at the traditional grounds for believing in God. Who ordered that? An unexpected new particle shakes the Standard Model. High-energy particle collision similar to those which may be giving us a glimpse of a new light boson outside the Standard Model (Image: Shutterstock) Image Gallery (2 images) In the mid-1930s, physicists thought they knew all the subatomic particles of nature – the proton, neutron, and electron of the atom.

However, in 1936 the muon was discovered – a new particle having such surprising properties that Nobel laureate I.I. Rabi quipped, "who ordered that? " The Universe in a Nutshell: Michio Kaku on the Physics of Everything. By Maria Popova. 579 - A 1939 Map of Physics.