Génome des Systèmes d'Intelligence Collective
CCIwp2009-01.pdf (Objet application/pdf)
References (6) 1. T.W. The Collective Intelligence Genome The Collective Intelligence Genome
Information markets, wikis and other applications that tap into the collective intelligence of groups have recently generated tremendous interest. But what”s the reality behind the hype? Image courtesy of “American Idol.” The human brain is a magnificent instrument that has evolved over thousands of years to enable us to prosper in an impressive range of conditions. Decisions 2.0: The Power of Collective Intelligence Decisions 2.0: The Power of Collective Intelligence
Peter Gloor, Research Scientist, MIT 03-19-09 Interview Transcription Peter Gloor, Research Scientist, MIT 03-19-09 Interview Transcription Copyright 2010 Betsey Merkel and I-Open. Creative Commons 3.0Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works. Institute for Open EconomicNetworks (I-Open) 4415 Euclid Ave 3rd Fl Cleveland, Ohio 44103 USA about being all members of a swarm and these COINS – theseCollaborative Innovation Networks – for me, they are the mainbuilding blocks of those self-organizing groups of people that I call theswarms. I have stumbled on this idea of the swarm by chance when Iwas in Paris with my children and we were looking for restaurantsand on the first day we ended up on top of Monte Martre, which is theplace where all the tourists go so what we did at that time was we didnot follow the swarm we followed the crowd.
Programing the Global Brain
From Handbook of Collective Intelligence One effort to create a taxonomy of collective intelligence is underway in the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence as part of the Handbook for Collective Intelligence project. So far, this project has included three “generations” of taxonomies. A taxonomy of collective intelligence - Handbook of Collective Intelligence A taxonomy of collective intelligence - Handbook of Collective Intelligence
Collective Intelligence 2012 Collective Intelligence 2012: April 18-20 Overview Collective intelligence has existed at least as long as humans have, because families, armies, countries, and companies have all--at least sometimes--acted collectively in ways that seem intelligent. But in the last decade or so a new kind of collective intelligence has emerged: groups of people and computers, connected by the Internet, collectively doing intelligent things. For example, Google technology harvests knowledge generated by millions of people creating and linking web pages and then uses this knowledge to answer queries in ways that often seem amazingly intelligent. Or in Wikipedia, thousands of people around the world have collectively created a very large and high quality intellectual product with almost no centralized control, and almost all as volunteers! Collective Intelligence 2012
deliberatorium-intro.pdf (Objet application/pdf)
Collective intelligence, in some form, has been around at least as long as humans have. Families, armies, countries, and companies have all—at least sometimes—acted collectively in ways that seem intelligent. But in the last few years, a new kind of collective intelligence has begun to emerge: groups of people and computers, connected by the Internet, collectively doing intelligent things. Consider Google, for instance. "Collective Intelligence 2012": Prof. Tom Malone on how new technologies are changing the ways people and computers work together | MIT Sloan Experts "Collective Intelligence 2012": Prof. Tom Malone on how new technologies are changing the ways people and computers work together | MIT Sloan Experts

Main Page - Handbook of Collective Intelligence

From Handbook of Collective Intelligence Handbook of Collective Intelligence Welcome! Terms and conditions. Please see following section on using and contributing to this handbook. Main Page - Handbook of Collective Intelligence
Mark Klein - Google Scholar Citations
MIT management professor Tom Malone on collective intelligence and the “genetic” structure of groups » Nieman Journalism Lab » Pushing to the Future of Journalism Do groups have genetic structures? If so, can they be modified? Those are two central questions for Thomas Malone, a professor of management and an expert in organizational structure and group intelligence at MIT’s Sloan School of Management.

MIT management professor Tom Malone on collective intelligence and the “genetic” structure of groups » Nieman Journalism Lab » Pushing to the Future of Journalism

Programming Collective Intelligence  About me and why I read this book I've been programming professionally for ~7.5 years, mainly business applications and reporting, so I already have quite some love for data. While I haven't used math much in my day jobs, I liked (and was good at) it in high school, including taking extra classes - so I have learned basic statistics. Refreshing and advancing my data analytics skills is one of my goals this year, and reading this book was part of the plan. About the book Programming Collective Intelligence 
A Billion Brains are Better Than One
malone.pdf (application/pdf-Objekt)
Jean Lievens Thomas Malone, director of the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence, is one of the leading thinkers in the realm of anticipating how new technologies will transform the way work is done and leaders lead. His 2004 book, The Future of Work: How the New Order of Business Will Shape Your Organization, Your Management Style, and Your Life,helped thousands of executives and would-be executives see their organizations, and themselves, in startling new ways. As a result, many organizations are becoming more collaborative and democratic. Now, Malone is exploring how social business, data analytics and cognitive computing will transform organizations once again. Here, he talks about the revolution that is coming. Jean Lievens: Thomas Malone on Collective Intelligence — You Have to Give Away Old Power In Order to Gain New Power Jean Lievens: Thomas Malone on Collective Intelligence — You Have to Give Away Old Power In Order to Gain New Power
In the current issue of MIT Sloan Management Review, Eric Bonabeau looks at not only the appeal of collective intelligence but also the practical issues managers need to consider to use it successfully. These days, the concept of collective intelligence is extremely popular — and, thanks to the Internet, companies turn to online communities to do everything from choose t-shirt designs to solve business problems. Now, in “Decisions: 2.0: The Power of Collective Intelligence,” an article in the Winter 2009 issue of MIT Sloan Management Review, Eric Bonabeau looks at not only the appeal of collective intelligence but also the practical issues managers need to consider to use it successfully. For every collective intelligence success story, Bonabeau notes, there are ”likely numerous projects that have failed because of faulty mechanism designs.” He concludes: Harness collective intelligence
What makes a group able to succeed at large number of different tasks? Women, sharing, and sensitivity. When it comes to a successful group, the easiest way to ensure victory may be placing women on the team. MIT Unravels the Secrets Behind Collective Intelligence – Hint: IQ Not So Important
The emerging science of 'collective intelligence' — and the rise of the global brain Over at the Edge there's a fascinating article by Thomas W. Malone about the work he and others are doing to understand the rise of collective human intelligence — an emergent phenomenon that's being primarily driven by our information technologies. We may be on an evolutionary trajectory, he argues, that could someday give rise to the global brain. And amazingly, he's developing an entirely new scientific discipline to back his case.
It's also possible for groups of people to work together in ways that seem pretty stupid, and I think collective stupidity is just as possible as collective intelligence. Part of what I want to understand and part of what the people I'm working with want to understand is what are the conditions that lead to collective intelligence rather than collective stupidity. But in whatever form, either intelligence or stupidity, this collective behavior has existed for a long time. What's new, though, is a new kind of collective intelligence enabled by the Internet. Think of Google, for instance, where millions of people all over the world create web pages, and link those web pages to each other. Then all that knowledge is harvested by the Google technology so that when you type a question in the Google search bar the answers you get often seem amazingly intelligent, at least by some definition of the word "intelligence."

Collective Intelligence

All Together Now (or, Can Collective Intelligence Save the Planet?)
Tom Malone - Program for the Future Dec. 8
Decisions 2.0: The Power of Collective Intelligence | MIT Sloan Management Review
Collective Intelligence