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Language In Use. It is great to show and offer students many examples of English language in use.

Language In Use

Meaning, students appreciate that there are many ways to say the same thing and like to see the "nuance" of the English language. Here are some images showing different ways / expressions to communicate a similar thing. Might be handy. Also, view as a slideshow or you can purchase and edit in ppt. If interested in this kind of approach, you might be interested in my ebook "Get TALKing" which has 28 lessons all based around language chunks. Speaking Exercises. Conversation Topic Generator.

Quick grammar. English Tongue Twisters. Medical English for doctors and patients, pharmacists, etc. The best game ever! (How to increase student talking time) One of the rewards of teaching a class of 16 talented, motivated 12-year-olds is that you feel that almost every activity turns into something really valuable.

The best game ever! (How to increase student talking time)

Not that you don’t feel the same will other classes, it’s just that with young learners it’s somehow more tangible. Today, a classic game-like activity – originally meant to be just a warm-up to start the class – changed itself into a complex, meaningful and authentic lesson. I deliberately said ‘changed itself’, but I should probably say ‘the students changed it so’. I had come up with an unexceptional idea, but it was them who changed it into a pure gem. I’m sure everybody is familiar with Categories (aka The Alphabet Game).

Normally, it can get pretty complicated because the team members (or the teacher) often have to verify if a word actually exists, or if it’s spelt correctly. Now, her seemingly commonplace remark took my breath away. Then a miracle happened. Like this: Like Loading... Vocabulary and autonomy. The general aim is to involve the students in a more autonomous fashion in their learning, rather than simply having them presented with word lists selected by the teacher or syllabus.

Vocabulary and autonomy

The role of vocabulary teachingHow can teachers help their learners? Self-initiated independent learningFormal practiceFunctional practiceMemorizingBest approachPractical activitiesReferences The role of vocabulary teachingIn the context of learning English as a foreign language, a learner is forced to be autonomous and independent and make conscious effort to learn vocabulary outside the classroom simply because the exposure to the target language is limited in class.

So teachers cannot rely on their Ss 'picking up' lexical items. WORD GAMES. Ammon Shea, a 37-year-old former furniture remover in New York, spent 12 months conquering what he describes as the Everest of dictionaries, the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), by ploughing through 20 volumes, 21,730 pages and 59 million words (read more here).


We can only guess how much of what he read has stayed between his ears, which is, at times, quite a challenge for our students. Luckily for the latter, though, their word lists are much shorter. We can use some magic formulae for helping words stick in the head trying to come up with clever associations, getting students to use definitions, determining a rate at which words should be learnt without falling out of their heads, creating some “brain surprises” (see more here), or resort to some oldies but goldies – word games.

These are some pen and paper games that require next to no time to prepare and might be used to get students to look through their word lists again and again, and help them retain new vocabulary. Squares Stop! Medical English for doctors and patients, pharmacists, etc.