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Cross Platform Monitoring

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Enabling and disabling services during start up in GNU/Linux. This guide shows you how to enable and disable services in Linux. This is the command line method of enabling and disabling services. Some Linux distributions like Fedora, Ubuntu and so on do provide a GUI front-end as well. In any Linux distribution, some services are enabled to start at boot up by default. On my machine, I have PCMCIA, Cron, Postfix Mail Transport Agent ... just to name a few, which start during boot up. You should run only those services that are absolutely necessary.

Disable the rest, as they can be potential security risks and also waste hardware resources. For example, my machine does not have any PCMCIA cards so I can safely disable it. So how do you disable these services so that they are not started at boot time? The answer to that depends on the type of Linux distribution you are using. True, many Linux distributions including Ubuntu bundle with them a GUI front end to accomplish the task which makes it easier to enable and disable the system services. How to Restart Services in Linux (with Step-by-Step Screenshots) How to monitor RedHat Enterprise Linux 5 or 6 using Microsoft System Center Operations Manager (SCOM) 2012 R2. Accessing UNIX and Linux Computers in Operations Manager. Updated: November 1, 2013 Applies To: System Center 2012 - Operations Manager, System Center 2012 R2 Operations Manager, System Center 2012 SP1 - Operations Manager In System Center 2012 – Operations Manager, the management server uses two protocols to communicate with the UNIX or Linux computer: Secure Shell (SSH) Used for installing, upgrading, and removing agents.

Web Services for Management (WS-Management)Used for all monitoring operations and include the discovery of agents that were already installed. The protocol that is used depends on the action or information that is requested on the management server. All actions, such as agent maintenance, monitors, rules, tasks, and recoveries, are configured to use predefined profiles according to their requirement for an unprivileged or privileged account.

For detailed instructions for specifying credentials and configuring accounts, see How to Set Credentials for Accessing UNIX and Linux Computers. Accessing UNIX and Linux Computers Topics. Credentials You Must Have to Access UNIX and Linux Computers. This topic describes how you use credentials to install, maintain, upgrade, and uninstall agents. Credentials for Installing Agents Operations Manager uses the Secure Shell (SSH) protocol to install an agent and Web Services for Management (WS-Management) to discover previously installed agents. Installation requires a privileged account on the UNIX or Linux computer. There are two ways to provide credentials to the targeted computer, as obtained by the Computer and Device Management Wizard: Specify a user name and password.The SSH protocol uses the password to install an agent or the WS-Management protocol if the agent was already installed by using a signed certificate.

If you are not using the credentials for a privileged account, you can provide additional credentials so that your account becomes a privileged account through elevation of privilege on the UNIX or Linux computer. The installation is not completed until the agent is verified. Specify a user name and a password. How to Set Credentials for Accessing UNIX and Linux Computers.

Updated: November 1, 2013 Applies To: System Center 2012 - Operations Manager, System Center 2012 R2 Operations Manager, System Center 2012 SP1 - Operations Manager This topic contains procedures for how to set credentials in wizards for the following tasks, as set by wizards in System Center 2012 – Operations Manager: These wizards define credentials to be authenticated on the UNIX or Linux computer and follow a similar process. For an overview of how credentials are provided, see Accessing UNIX and Linux Computers in Operations Manager. Credentials for Discovering UNIX and Linux Computers The following procedure begins in Computer and Device Management Wizard, on the Discovery Criteria page, when you click the Set Credentials button. To set a user (unprivileged) account for discovery of an installed agent with a signed certificate. On the Credential Settings page, click the Default Credentials tab, and then click the Password option.

To set a privileged credential by using an SSH key. How to Configure sudo Elevation and SSH Keys. Updated: November 1, 2013 Applies To: System Center 2012 - Operations Manager, System Center 2012 R2 Operations Manager, System Center 2012 SP1 - Operations Manager Starting with System Center 2012 – Operations Manager, you can provide credentials for an unprivileged account to be elevated on a UNIX or Linux computer by using the sudo program, which allows users to run programs that have the security privileges of another user account. You can also use Secure Shell (SSH) keys instead of a password for secure communication between Operations Manager and the targeted computer.

This topic provides examples for creating an account for a low-privileged user, implementing sudo, and creating an SSH key on a computer that is running Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server 6. These are examples only, and might not reflect your environment. The following examples provide a user with access to a full set of privileges. Configure a Low-Privileged Account for sudo Elevation To create a low-privileged user. Install Agent and Certificate on UNIX and Linux Computers Using the Command Line. Updated: November 1, 2013 Applies To: System Center 2012 - Operations Manager, System Center 2012 R2 Operations Manager, System Center 2012 SP1 - Operations Manager Your environment may require that you manually install the agent.

Use the following procedures to manually install agents to UNIX and Linux computers for monitoring in System Center 2012 – Operations Manager and System Center 2012 Service Pack 1 (SP1), Operations Manager. To install the agent on Red Hat Enterprise Linux and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server Transfer the agent (scx-<version>-<os>-<arch>.rpm) to the Linux server, type: scx-<version>-<os>-<arch>.rpm To install the package, type: rpm -i scx-<version>-<os>-<arch>.rpm To verify that the package is installed, type: rpm -q scx To verify that the Microsoft SCX CIM Server is running, type: service scx-cmid status To install the agent on RPM based Universal Linux Servers (Oracle and Centos) Transfer the agent (scx-<version>-universalr-<arch>.rpm) to the Linux server. Software Communities: Space: SCOM.

How to Use the Bulk URL Editor Tool to Create Web Application Monitors. The Bulk URL Editor tool (also referred to as the Bulk URL Manager tool) enables you to create multiple URL monitors at one time. With Operations Manager 2007 R2, you can now monitor up to 1000 URLs per watcher node and 3000 URLs per management group. Before the R2 release of Operations Manager 2007, creating the monitors for that number of URLs was time-consuming, as each monitor had to be created manually. The Bulk URL Editor tool creates a new type of monitoring template, which is added to a new or existing management pack. You can then add URLs in bulk to this monitoring template. By default, all of the URLs will be monitored by the same watcher node and with the same configuration settings; you can customize these settings in the Operations console after the templates are created.

(You will have to resynchronize any changes to the template in the Bulk URL Editor tool for them to take effect.) The following sections describe how to use the Bulk URL Editor tool. To add a watcher node. Uninstalling Cross Platform Management Packs and Agents. Updated: May 22, 2009 Applies To: Operations Manager 2007 R2, Operations Manager 2007 SP1 When you no longer need a management pack, you can delete it by using the Operations console. When you delete a management pack, all the settings and thresholds that are associated with it are removed from Microsoft System Center Operations Manager 2007 R2.

The associated .mp or .xml file is not deleted from the hard disk of the management server. You can delete a management pack only if you have first deleted dependent management packs. There are three ways to uninstall the cross platform management packs and agents. Delete selected UNIX or Linux system management packs from the Operations Manager 2007 R2 console. Use the following procedures to uninstall agents. To delete a UNIX or Linux system management pack from the Operations console Open the Operations console with an account that is a member of the Operations Manager 2007 R2 Administrators profile. To uninstall the agent from HP-UX. Linux Directory Structure Explained with diagram. Install Agent on UNIX and Linux Using the Discovery Wizard.

Linux Agent install issue - Chandan Bharti's Blog. I tried discovering a linux box and deploying agent, But I see below error. My WinRM service is running perfectly fine on the management server. My error is: “”The WinRM client cannot complete the operation within the time specified. Check if the machine name is valid and is reachable over the network and firewall exception for Windows Remote Management service is enabled.”” When I telnet to port 1270, the connection fails. There we have an issue. Very simple Run this to open the port on linux box.

Iptables -I INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 1270 -j ACCEPT Ok now that your ports are open, now when you try to discover and try installation, you see “”access denied.”” When I see in the event Log of RMS, I see event ID 1002 Log Name: Operations Manager Source: Cross Platform Discovery Date: 12/16/2011 8:19:18 AM Event ID: 1002 Task Category: None Level: Error Keywords: Classic User: N/A Computer: CHBH25062627-1.dc250626.local Description: Discovery of linux failed with the following error: Details: Event Xml: Open Ports on Linux Systems. Opening Ports in a Linux Firewall This guide applies only to users of Linux based operating systems. The procedure for opening ports in the Linux firewall "iptables" is relatively simple. First, open a command-line terminal. In most systems, you can usually find this in your 'Applications' menu under the 'System Tools' section. Once you have a terminal open, you have to obtain root access to change firewall settings.

Do this by typing: su - You will be prompted for your root password. In the following examples, substitute the port # you want to open for the 12345 in the command. If you want to open an incoming TCP port, type the following: iptables -I INPUT -p tcp --dport 12345 --syn -j ACCEPT If you want to open a UDP port (perhaps for DHT in Tixati), type the following: iptables -I INPUT -p udp --dport 12345 -j ACCEPT After you are done opening ports in your firewall, you can save your changes so they will be applied when you restart your computer by typing the following command: That's it! Deploying Unix/Linux Agents using OpsMgr 2012 - Kevin Holman's System Center Blog. Microsoft started including Unix and Linux monitoring in OpsMgr directly in OpsMgr 2007 R2, which shipped in 2009. Some significant updates have been made to this for OpsMgr 2012. Primarily these updates are around: Highly available Monitoring via Resource Pools Sudo elevation support for using a low priv account with elevation rights for specific workflows.

Ssh key authentication New wizards for discovery, agent upgrade, and agent uninstallation Additional Powershell cmdlets Performance and scalability improvements New monitoring templates for common monitoring tasks This article will cover the discovery, agent deployment, and monitoring configuration of a Linux server in OpsMgr 2012. I am going to run through this as a typical user would – and show some of the pitfalls if you don’t follow the exact order of configuration required. So what would anyone do first? High Level Overview: The high level process is as follows: Import Management Packs: ***A note on sudo elevated accounts:

Manually Installing Cross Platform Agents. Updated: May 22, 2009 Applies To: Operations Manager 2007 R2, Operations Manager 2007 SP1 Automatic System Discovery might not detect some UNIX and Linux systems due to firewalls or security issues. For example, if the UNIX or Linux root password is not available to the Microsoft System Center Operations Manager 2007 administrator, an error might result. Use the following procedures to manually install agents to UNIX and Linux systems. To install the agent on Red Hat Enterprise Linux and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server Transfer the agent (scx-<version>-<os>-<arch>.rpm) to the Linux server. To install the agent on Solaris Transfer the agent (scx-<version>-<os>-<arch>.pkg.Z) to the Solaris server. To install the agent on HP-UX To install the agent on AIX. Deploying UNIX or Linux Agents. Updated: May 22, 2009 Applies To: Operations Manager 2007 R2, Operations Manager 2007 SP1 Microsoft System Center Operations Manager 2007 Cross Platform uses Web Services Management (WS-Man) 1.1, a Web services-based protocol that enables remote computer management over HTTP and HTTPS, including hardware management and policy-based event forwarding.

WS-Man enables secure and efficient data transfers by requiring authentication and using HTTPS as the transport. It is required for all communication between Operations Manager 2007 and UNIX or Linux systems. Install WS-Management (WS-Man) 1.1, available from the Microsoft Download Center ( Steps for Monitoring Cross-Platform Computers Considerations for Monitoring Solaris Zones Solaris Zones are supported on Solaris 10 or newer versions. Is SCOM R2 Ready for Cross Platform in Your Environment? – Systems Center Operations Manager Solutions.

Updated to reflect SCOM R2 Cumulative Update 4 With the release of SCOM R2, the ability to natively monitor Unix servers has become a welcome reality. For many enterprises, this much anticipated functionality bridges the gap between disparate monitoring systems. Consolidating Unix and Windows servers into the same console provides a more holistic view into the health of your systems. The benefits of managing Windows and Unix servers with a single monitoring platform are many. Most notably, cost savings (licenses, support), consolidated alerting and availability reporting using the SCOM Data Warehouse. Support individuals will also appreciate the familiar monitoring interface. Problem Statement If reading this article and unsure if your management servers have the right updates or configuration, you’re in the right place. Some hotfixes are applied to solve a particular issue whereas others resolve critical problems.

Note: Previously, these were separate updates. Solution / Benefit Summary. Appendix A - Cross Platform Operating System Package Dependencies.