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4 Ways High School Makes You Hate Reading. I can't be the only one who feels like the schools pulled a sort of bait-and-switch job on us when it came to reading.

4 Ways High School Makes You Hate Reading

When I was in elementary school, they went to a lot of trouble to make sure we thought reading was fun, with bookmobiles and read-a-thons and tons of fun books about mice and motorcycles and phantom tollbooths. I had confidence that I could go to the library and pull anything off the shelf except a Baby-Sitters Club book and I wouldn't be disappointed. Goodreads.comThis is one of those books that you could judge by its cover. That was the bait. In junior high and high school, they made the switch. Text Messages: Recommendations for Adolescent Readers. Home › Parent & Afterschool Resources › Podcast Series Text Messages is a monthly podcast providing families, educators, out-of-school practitioners, and tutors reading recommendations they can pass along to teen readers.

Text Messages: Recommendations for Adolescent Readers

Each episode will feature in-depth recommendations of titles that will engage and excite teen readers. Book Report Alternative: Creating Reading Excitement with Book Trailers. ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us.

Book Report Alternative: Creating Reading Excitement with Book Trailers

If you've got lessons plans, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you. More. Considering the Future of Reading: Lessons, Links and Thought Experiments. How is the definition of “reading” changing?

Considering the Future of Reading: Lessons, Links and Thought Experiments

How does the experience of reading with new technologies affect the transaction between text and reader? What is the future of the book industry? What does all this mean for schools, students and literacy rates? In 2008, The New York Times published a series called “The Future of Reading” in which some of these questions were raised. Doc.renlearn.com/KMNet/R004101202GH426A.pdf. Entertainment - Emily Temple - 10 Important Life Lessons From Children's Books. Don't eat magic figs, don't forget your crayon, and don't let insane cats into your home Harper & Row This week, children's book author and illustrator Chris Van Allsburg turned 63.

Entertainment - Emily Temple - 10 Important Life Lessons From Children's Books

The 20 Biggest Reasons You Should Read. Passionate readers generally enjoy more finely-tuned brains than those who prefer more passive (though not lesser) activities, so anyone hoping to improve their minds both psychologically and cognitively might want to think about taking up the habit of regular reading.

The 20 Biggest Reasons You Should Read

Enhances the senses Merely reading a word reflecting a color or a scent immediately fires up the corresponding section of the brain, which empathizes with written experiences as if they actually happened to the audience. Researchers believe this might very well help sharpen the social acumen needed to forge valuable relationships with others. Enables lifelong learning In correlation with the previous perk, sensual stimulation makes it easier for aging brains to keep absorbing and processing new information over time.

An International Non-Profit Advocating for and Working Towards Global Literacy - Words Changing Worlds - Add Your Voice. The End of Nonfiction: Common Core standards force us to rethink categorization. Photo by CCAC North Library Reference is dead.

The End of Nonfiction: Common Core standards force us to rethink categorization

Don’t worry though, fiction and nonfiction will keep it good company in the great resting place in the sky for obsolete library sections. These days, it’s the Common Core standards that should be driving collection development in the school library, and CC requirements extend well beyond fiction, nonfiction, and reference. I’m not suggesting you jettison all reference materials. Quite the contrary, we must free these valuable resources from reference shelves in the off chance that someone will need to ask a question without having easy access to Wikipedia (I’m joking, sort of). Discount School Supply - Spectra® Art Tissue. 10 Apps for Learners Who Struggle with Reading and/or Writing. Despite the growing use of multimedia in classrooms, schools remain primarily text oriented.

10 Apps for Learners Who Struggle with Reading and/or Writing

This is a major problem for significant numbers of learners who struggle with text. No matter how capable they may be in other respects, these students are not “academically” oriented in the ways that tend to matter most in the classroom. For many, it’s a processing issue. Others have difficulty with the physical mechanics of writing. So, as I’ve explored possibilities with the iPhone and iPad, my most urgent priority has been to discover free and low-cost tools that can be effective in supporting individuals who struggle with text.

Teach Mentor Texts: It's Monday! What Are You Reading? 2/20/12. It’s Monday!

Teach Mentor Texts: It's Monday! What Are You Reading? 2/20/12

What Are You Reading? From Picture Books to YA! It's Monday! What are you Reading? Reading for Pleasure. Stephen Krashen explains why we should stop scolding teenagers and their schools Contrary to popular opinion, there is no evidence that teenagers are less engaged in literacy activities today than teenagers of the past.

Reading for Pleasure

Teenagers today do just as much book reading as teenagers did 65 years ago, and it appears that they are more involved in reading and writing in general when we include computer use in the analysis. The true problem in literacy is not related to convincing reluctant teenagers to read: It is providing access to books for those living in poverty. How Much do Teenagers Read? It is a common perception that teenagers don’t read as much as they used to. Rocco Staino: Oscar-Nominated Short Celebrates Books & It's an App, Too! (Video) The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore, an animated film by Moonbot Studios, is a love letter to books and its curative powers.

In addition to books, the Louisiana-based children's author and filmmaker, William Joyce, was inspired by Hurricane Katrina, Buster Keaton and The Wizard of Oz when writing this film that was nominated for an Academy Award as an animated short. The awards will be presented on February 26th. Morris Lessmore is also available as an iPad app. "A powerful example of what books can be in the age of the iPad," said Macworld when it was awarded Macworld's App Gem Award in December. Top Ten Urban YA.

In preparation for compiling a top ten list, I asked a good friend of mine if I could raid her English department library to brush up on my urban YA lit. As we poured over titles in a colleague’s classroom library, she asked, “How are you defining ‘urban YA?’” I paused. “Well, YA titles with urban settings I guess?” (Dur). I started to rattle off a number of what I felt to be obvious criteria: issues that deal with street violence, gangs, drugs, racial conflict, teen pregnancy, homeless teens, obscene language….and I stopped myself. MagellanTech4U - Tech Tools for Teaching Reading. There are many ways to integrate Internet resources, hardware, and application software to enhance reading instruction.

The following is just a start. Feel free to add more ideas. 2011 Best Fiction for Young Adults. The list of 99 books, drawn from 191 official nominations, is presented annually at the ALA Midwinter Meeting. In 2010, YALSA restructured the charge for the Best Books for Young Adults committee and renamed it Best Fiction for Young Adults. The 2011 list is the first for the new committee. Nerdy Book Club. Writing for Readers. Wilhelm Book.