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TV anchor says live on-air 'Alexa, order me a dollhouse' – guess what happens next. A San Diego TV station sparked complaints this week – after an on-air report about a girl who ordered a dollhouse via her parents' Amazon Echo caused Echoes in viewers' homes to also attempt to order dollhouses.

TV anchor says live on-air 'Alexa, order me a dollhouse' – guess what happens next

Facebook lurking makes you miserable, says study. Image copyright iStock Too much Facebook browsing at Christmas - and seeing all those "perfect" families and holiday photos - is more likely to make you miserable than festive, research suggests.

Facebook lurking makes you miserable, says study

What it feels like to be the last generation to remember life before the internet — Quartz. I’ve long believed that speed is the ultimate weapon in business.

What it feels like to be the last generation to remember life before the internet — Quartz

All else being equal, the fastest company in any market will win. Speed is a defining characteristic—if not the defining characteristic—of the leader in virtually every industry you look at. In tech, speed is seen primarily as an asset in product development. Why video game Minecraft is a learning aid for schools. Amazon plans headphones that know when someone says your name. Noise-canceling headphones provide a peaceful haven for those trying to work or sleep in loud environments, but make it difficult to hear when someone really needs your attention.

Amazon plans headphones that know when someone says your name

To address this problem, Amazon has outlined plans for headphones that selectively listen out for certain sound patterns – such as someone saying a specific keyword, such as your name. 10 of the best female role models in tech – in pictures. The joys of Pokémon Go: exercise, the outdoors and 'full-on escapism' Facebook is chipping away at privacy – and my profile has been exposed. Quietly, over the last year, Facebook has killed the concept of a private account.

Facebook is chipping away at privacy – and my profile has been exposed

The site has always had a love-hate relationship with privacy: it’s long offered some of the most granular controls of any social network for choosing who sees what content, letting users make posts visible on a sliding scale from “everyone” to “only me”. That’s increasingly important for Facebook, which has seen a reduction of 21% in “original sharing”, users making posts about their own life. As people have become more aware of the downsides of sharing personal details publicly, it seems that they’ve stopped sharing altogether. Google's My Activity reveals just how much it knows about you. Google has rolled out new tools to let users see what its ad-tracking service has learned about them, and to let users opt in or out of a new personalised ads service.

Google's My Activity reveals just how much it knows about you

The addition to Google’s account settings, called My Activity, allows users to review everything that Google has tracked about their behaviour – across search, YouTube, Chrome, Android and everything else – and edit or delete it at each step. If you use Google for everything you do, you might be surprised by just how much it catalogues about your comings and goings on the internet.

The My Activity tools comes with new ad preferences. Microsoft chatbot is taught to swear on Twitter. Image copyright Microsoft A chatbot developed by Microsoft has gone rogue on Twitter, swearing and making racist remarks and inflammatory political statements.

Microsoft chatbot is taught to swear on Twitter

The experimental AI, which learns from conversations, was designed to interact with 18-24-year-olds. Just 24 hours after artificial intelligence Tay was unleashed, Microsoft appeared to be editing some of its more inflammatory comments. The software firm said it was "making some adjustments". "The AI chatbot Tay is a machine learning project, designed for human engagement.

Image copyright Twitter. Future - These unlucky people have names that break computers. Jennifer Null’s husband had warned her before they got married that taking his name could lead to occasional frustrations in everyday life.

Future - These unlucky people have names that break computers

She knew the sort of thing to expect – his family joked about it now and again, after all. And sure enough, right after the wedding, problems began. “We moved almost immediately after we got married so it came up practically as soon as I changed my name, buying plane tickets,” she says. When Jennifer Null tries to buy a plane ticket, she gets an error message on most websites. The site will say she has left the surname field blank and ask her to try again. Google tests black links in searches. This hacked Game Boy hides a Raspberry Pi and hundreds of games. If you want a handy illustration of how far consumer technology has come in the last 30 years, just take a look at this video from electronics wizard Wermy, who has gutted an original Game Boy and modified it to play hundreds of console games.

This hacked Game Boy hides a Raspberry Pi and hundreds of games

From the outside, the device looks like one of Nintendo's 27-year-old handhelds, but its gray plastic shell hides a rechargeable lithium ion battery, a Bluetooth receiver, and a Raspberry Pi. A series of pictures show how the "Game Boy Zero" was put together, complete with new buttons, updated ports, and a new screen — necessary because the original Game Boy could only manage monochrome games. Wermy's version uses a color display that makes it capable of playing more modern games. The tiny Raspberry Pi inside runs Emulation Station, software that lets Wermy play games from not only the Game Boy's back catalog, but from the NES, SNES, and even Sega's Genesis and Master System consoles.

First look at the Raspberry Pi 3. Your phone number is all a hacker needs to read texts, listen to calls and track you. Hackers have again demonstrated that no matter how many security precautions someone takes, all a hacker needs to track their location and snoop on their phone calls and texts is their phone number.

Your phone number is all a hacker needs to read texts, listen to calls and track you

The hack, first demonstrated by German security researcher Karsten Nohl in 2014 at a hacker convention in Hamburg, has been shown to still be active by Nohl over a year later for CBS’s 60 Minutes. The hack uses the network interchange service called Signalling System No. 7 (SS7), also known as C7 in the UK or CCSS7 in the US, which acts as a broker between mobile phone networks. When calls or text messages are made across networks SS7 handles details such as number translation, SMS transfer, billing and other back-end duties that connect one network or caller to another. Nohl, who is currently conducting vulnerability analysis of SS7 for several international mobile phone networks, demonstrated the hack for the CBS show. Why thinking like a computer scientist can help with big decisions. Europe wants robots to count as people.