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Ever wonder what the colors of the tie tags on loaves of bread represent? They're a code designating the day of the week on which a loaf was baked: * Blue: Monday * Green: Tuesday * Red: Thursday * White: Friday * Yellow: Saturday[...]An easy way to remember it, though, is to simply recall the alphabet. The colors run in alphabetical order, so the earlier they appear in the alphabet, the earlier in the week the bread was baked. And it’s true. Even the ever-cynical Snopes.com backs it up. The Bread Code The Bread Code

Techniques Every Cook Should Know

Techniques Every Cook Should Know Breading This easy, three-step technique ensures an even crumb coating. It's commonly used on thin cuts of chicken, pork or veal that will be fried or baked. To begin, set up your breading station. Fill the first of three shallow dishes with flour. In the second dish, make an egg wash by whisking eggs with a little bit of water, milk or other liquid or seasoning.
Anonymous said... Saved to my iPhone for future reference. THANKS! July 20, 2010 at 4:39 PM the only one i like is granny smith ha ha..

Apple Flavor Spectrum

Apple Flavor Spectrum
There are two basic methods to test for how done your meat is while you are cooking it – use a meat thermometer, or press on the meat with your finger tips. The problem with the meat thermometer approach is that when you poke a hole into the meat with a thermometer, it can let juices escape, juices that you would rather have stay in the meat. For this reason, most experienced cooks rely on a “finger test” method, especially on steaks (whole roasts are better tested with a thermometer). My mother has been trying to get me to test meat with my finger tips for years, and for years, being somewhat of a scaredy cat (won’t it burn my fingers?) I ignored, avoided, ran away from the idea. Then my friend David showed me up.

Check the Doneness of Meat

Check the Doneness of Meat