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El Niño and La Niña Years and Intensities.

Ozone depletion

California’s Storm: The Coolest View You Will See Today | KQED News Fix. Scientists debunk climate change myths. Wits University scientists have debunked two big myths around climate change by proving firstly, that despite predictions, tropical storms are not increasing in number. However, they are shifting, and South Africa could be at increased risk of being directly impacted by tropical cyclones within the next 40 years. Secondly, while global warming is causing frost to be less severe, late season frost is not receding as quickly as flowering is advancing, resulting in increased frost risk which will likely begin to threaten food security. According to Jennifer Fitchett, a PhD student in the Wits School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies (GAES), there has been an assumption that increasing sea surface temperatures caused by global warming is causing an increase in the number of tropical cyclones. The big surprise came when Fitchett and Grab looked at where storms have been happening.

South Africa is already feeling the effects of this shift. Fitchett, J. M. and Grab, S. If Yellowstone Could Talk, It Might Squeak. Blame The Helium : The Two-Way. Hide captionSunset on the Firehole River, Yellowstone National Park. Bill Young/Flickr A huge amount of ancient helium is rising up from the rocks beneath Yellowstone National Park — about enough to fill up a Goodyear blimp every week. The gas comes from a vast store of helium that's accumulated in the Earth's crust for hundreds of millions of years, scientists report in the journal Nature this week.

The helium is being released because in the past couple of million years — very recently, in geologic time — that old part of the crust has been feeling the heat from a huge volcano that is now sleeping underneath the park. hide captionHot steam and gas emerge from a fumarole where the boiling-temperature vapor is diverted into an evacuated sample bottle. J.

Hot steam and gas emerge from a fumarole where the boiling-temperature vapor is diverted into an evacuated sample bottle. Usually, volcanoes form at the edges of the tectonic plates that make up the Earth's crust.

Hurricane

EDW - El Dorado Weather. Lightning. In Damp Country, Record-Breaking Rains Flood Britain : Parallels. Hide captionA woman walks through floodwaters west of London. A storm left tens of thousands of people in Britain without power Thursday and one man dead, adding to the misery that began with heavy rains back in December. BEN STANSALL/AFP/Getty Images A woman walks through floodwaters west of London. A storm left tens of thousands of people in Britain without power Thursday and one man dead, adding to the misery that began with heavy rains back in December.

Parts of England have been underwater for more than six weeks now, since storms began pummeling the west of Great Britain around Christmas. Now the floodwaters are lapping near Windsor Castle, as the Thames overflows its banks. You needn't travel far from central London to find the misery: A 20-minute train ride from the city brings you to West Byfleet. Hide captionPriscilla Smithers and her four children have arranged chairs around a few air mattresses to create a space for themselves, after fleeing their home. Ari Shapiro/NPR.

Wind

Warming Arctic May Be Causing Jet Stream To Lose Its Way : The Two-Way. Hide captionThe jet stream that circles Earth's north pole travels west to east. But when the jet stream interacts with a Rossby wave, as shown here, the winds can wander far north and south, bringing frigid air to normally mild southern states. The jet stream that circles Earth's north pole travels west to east. But when the jet stream interacts with a Rossby wave, as shown here, the winds can wander far north and south, bringing frigid air to normally mild southern states. Mark Twain once said: "If you don't like the weather in New England now, just wait a few minutes. " He was making an unknowing reference to the jet stream, which drives the weather over North America and Europe like a high-altitude conveyor belt.

But increasingly, the jet stream is taking a more circuitous route over the northern latitudes, meaning weather systems hang around longer than they used to. In all of the talk recently about the "polar vortex," you've already heard some of this. Getting Better At Predicting The Weather. After a brutal week of winter storms, the meteorological community is trying to improve the way weather is studied, predicted and communicated to the public. Thomas Bogdan, president of University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, talks with NPR's Arun Rath about the innovations in weather reporting. Copyright © 2014 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required. It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. It has been an ugly winter. Meanwhile, more than a million customers lost power during the storm. UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: The Weather Channel has just named its 17th winter storm of the season...

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: ...from the heaviest snowfall this winter. UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: It's going to be a cold and windy afternoon. UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #2: More than 75,000 domestic flights canceled and... UNIDENTIFIED MAN #3: ...and that is where the forecast gets very tricky. BOGDAN: Indeed. Copyright © 2014 NPR. What Is The Psychological Effect Of Naming Storms? Copyright © 2014 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required. Along with plenty of ice, sleet and snow, much of the country has also been blanketed this winter by an avalanche of names. When winter storms assault us, they now come with names like Hercules, Janus and, the most recent storm, Pax. Here's NPR's social science correspondent Shankar Vedantam on why we name winter storms and how those names might affect us.

SHANKAR VEDANTAM, BYLINE: We've been naming hurricanes for many years. UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: The list of names for the 2010 year are as follows: Alex, Bonnie, Collin, Danielle... VEDANTAM: Now The Weather Channel is doing it with winter storms. UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Winter Storm Pat, when is it going to be winter storm leaving South? VEDANTAM: At the University of Chicago, psychologist Nicholas Epley has noticed a pattern. NICHOLAS EPLEY: Notice that long stretches of beautiful sunny weather don't get names.

Cloud seeding with video

Blizzard Conditions Ahead. Everlasting Storm: Venezuela Wins Guinness Record for Most Lightning. A light show that has been going on for thousands of years in Venezuela has made it into the Guinness record books. The mouth of the Catatumbo River, in the western Venezuelan state of Zulia, claimed the record for the area with the most lightning — notching an incredible 3,600 flashes per hour.

According to io9, the residents of the nearby Lake Maracaibo need to shut their blinds against the light roughly 300 nights each year. For centuries, the indigenous people of Northwestern Venezuela called the phenomenon "rib a-ha" or "river of fire in the sky," and ancient mariners supposedly used the lightning for navigation. The storm is so central to region's identity that the state of Zulia put a large lightning bolt in the middle of its flag.

(MORE: Indonesian Volcano Erupts Again, Kills at Least 14) Why this particular area should be the site of the world's most perfect storm is still an open question. MORE FROM WEATHER.COM: Volcano Lightning. Cloud Lab | NOVA Labs. Heavy Snow Belts East Coast; Southeast Ice Storm Leaves 700,000 Without Power. Anatomy of a Super Typhoon — NOVA Next. By any measure, Super Typhoon Haiyan was one of the most extraordinary tropical cyclones in world history. Tropical cyclones rarely reach Category 5 strength, when wind speeds exceed 155 mph. In fact, an average of just four Category 5 storms occur globally each year. But as Haiyan hurtled westwards towards the Philippines across the warm waters of the West Pacific Ocean during the first week of November 2013, the storm fed off the deepest region of warm waters anywhere on the planet, rapidly intensifying into a Category 5 storm. A composite satellite image of Super Typhoon Haiyan bearing down on the Philippines As it swept over the open ocean, it continued to draw strength from the unusually warm waters below.

Three hours before landfall, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center said Haiyan’s winds were blowing at a sustained 195 mph and gusting to 235 mph, making it the fourth strongest tropical cyclone in world history. A Long Climate Shift Haiyan may have been decades in the making. A Ridge with a Cloud on Top. Storm with 100 mph gusts hits soggy Britain - Weather, forecasts, news, blogs and maps. Updated: 2/12/2014 The Met Office said in a paper published this week that "there is no definitive answer" on the role played by climate change in the recent weather and floods. British Prime Minister David Cameron called an emergency meeting to discuss response to the worsening floods throughout Britain, which are forcing some residents to evacuate. Photo: AP, February 12, 2014 LONDON — Britain's weather service says it sees the tentacles of climate change in a spate of storms and floods battering the country, but has stopped short of saying warming directly caused the extreme storms.

The latest round of bad weather hit Britain's west coast Wednesday with winds gusting at more than 100 miles (160 kilometers) an hour. MSN Weather: Check your local forecast But it said there is "an increasing body of evidence that extreme daily rainfall rates are becoming more intense," probably due to a warming world. MSN Weather: Is climate change to blame for UK floods? Science Behind The News: Tornadoes.