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The need to catalyze change in high school mathematics  - kappanonline.org. The high school mathematics curriculum needs to be reformed to encourage all students to understand the math that underlies the fabric of society.

The need to catalyze change in high school mathematics  - kappanonline.org

High school mathematics is not working for far too many students in the United States. Although the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) has shown significant and long-term positive trends in mathematics learning at the elementary and middle levels, high school NAEP scores have remained essentially flat for decades (National Center for Education Statistics, 2015, 2016). In addition, the Program for International Student Assessment shows that U.S. high school students trail their international peers in mathematical literacy, defined as the “capacity to formulate, employ, and interpret mathematics in a variety of contexts . . . to describe, explain, and predict phenomena” (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, 2016, p. 28).

Why learn mathematics? By opposing tracking well-meaning educators are hurting disadvantaged kids. Twenty years of classroom instruction experience has taught me that classes with diverse academic abilities present one of the most difficult teaching challenges.

By opposing tracking well-meaning educators are hurting disadvantaged kids

Typically, one is forced to focus on only a sub-group of students, usually the second quartile. As a consequence the lower and higher quartiles are not properly served. At the university level, we minimize this problem by offering different levels: remedial math versus math for engineers, probability for the Masters program versus probability for PhD students, co-ed intramural sports versus the varsity basketball team, intro to World Music versus a spot in the orchestra, etc. In K-12, tracking seems like the obvious solution to teaching to an array of student levels.

Best way to improve student math scores? Change teachers’ attitudes, study says. The Math Forum at NCTM. The Problems of the Week Program The Math Forum offers an integrated program based on our award-winning Problems of the Week.

The Math Forum at NCTM

The program has three components: Problems of the Week (PoWs) and Write Math: PoWs by Standard, including teacher support materials.Problem Solving and Communication Activity Series, focused on strategic competence and writing fluency.Professional Development for effective implementation, formative assessment, and building mathematical knowledge for teaching. Do the problems with your students, use the Activity Series to develop student confidence and higher order thinking skills, and collaborate with leading experts and fellow teachers through our professional development programs. More information about each component follows. Problems of the Week Problems of the Week (PoWs) are inventive, engaging challenges designed to get your students thinking, talking, and doing mathematics.

Problem Solving and Communication Activity Series. Weapons of maths destruction: are calculators killing our ability to work it out in our head? Since the 1980s we have had access to calculators of various types.

Weapons of maths destruction: are calculators killing our ability to work it out in our head?

Today, we can include computers and smartphones – which are attached to our hip 24/7. So does this ubiquitous access to calculators affect our ability to do maths in our heads like we used to? Thirty years ago calculators promised immense opportunity – opportunity, alas, that brought considerable controversy.

Is Algebra Necessary?

Math Content Development. Videos of Doing and Teaching Math. Pathways. Techniques. Equity. Research shows how children can enjoy and succeed in math, Stanford expert says. Stanford Report, December 17, 2015 Stanford Professor Jo Boaler says that research findings show how all students can learn to enjoy math and achieve at high levels without suffering from fear or failure.

Research shows how children can enjoy and succeed in math, Stanford expert says

By Clifton B. Parker Aaron Kehoe Education Professor Jo Boaler (center) observes the work of her students in the Stanford Teacher Education Program. Scientists Discover 15th Convex Pentagon Able To Tile A Plane. Consider the ceramic on the floor beneath you.

Scientists Discover 15th Convex Pentagon Able To Tile A Plane

Those squares or rectangles tile the plane. That's a mathematical term, and finding a new shape that covers a flat surface using only exact copies of that one shape without overlapping or leaving any gaps is a mathematical challenge. Deborah Ball's Selected Presentations. A veteran teacher turned coach shadows 2 students for 2 days – a sobering lesson learned. The following account comes from a veteran HS teacher who just became a Coach in her building.

A veteran teacher turned coach shadows 2 students for 2 days – a sobering lesson learned

* Math Struggles 401: Instructional timing and confusion. Brain-based research gives us a clearer picture of the optimal times for learning new content.

* Math Struggles 401: Instructional timing and confusion

LMR - Development Site. Learning Mathematics through Representations (LMR) is a research-based curriculum unit for the teaching and learning of integers and fractions in the elementary grades, using the number line as the principal representational context.

LMR - Development Site

The curriculum builds on two core ideas: mathematical representations are fundamental to mathematical communication and learning, and curriculum units should be designed as well-orchestrated lesson sequences that support insight and understanding of representational forms. The members of the LMR staff bring expertise in developmental and educational research, curriculum development, pre-service education and professional development, and elementary classroom teaching. The LMR team is led by Geoffrey B. Saxe and includes additional faculty and graduate students in the Graduate School of Education, University of California, Berkeley. Glogin?mobile=1&URI=http%3A%2F%2Fmobile.nytimes.com%2F2014%2F07%2F25%2Fopinion%2Fdont-teach-math-coach-it. When Less Is More: The Case for Teaching Less Math in School. When Less Is More: The Case for Teaching Less Math in School.

Beyond teacher egocentrism: design thinking. As teachers we understandably believe that it is the ‘teaching’ that causes learning.

Beyond teacher egocentrism: design thinking

But this is too egocentric a formulation.

Common Core

Social Study of Mathematics. Centre for Innovation in Mathematics Teaching.