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We Communities. Friday 31st July 2015 by @exerciseworks By Ann Gates, MRPharmS,CEO Exercise Works! Member of the World Heart Federation Emerging Leaders Programme 2014/15. The role of Allied Health Professionals (AHPs) in the prevention and treatment of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) has never been more critical 1. The health burden of illness, pain, health inequalities, disability and death from Great Britain’s top 3 main causes of disease: cardiovascular disease, cancer, and respiratory disease, are the nation’s biggest concerns for the future.2 These tomorrows, are dependent on providing personalised patient care and in managing the overall health economy. We already see the loss of 37,000 lives through physical inactivity alone3 yet the evidence for physical activity,exercise, sport and active leisure pursuits in preventing and helping to treat these diseases is strong4. So what do we know, and what are the barriers and enablers to making every contact count for physical activity advice?

Slimming World reveals wealth of knowledge and data that can help tackle obesity crisis. Interview with Dr Jacquie Lavin, Head of Nutrition & Research, Slimming World. 1/ What areas does Slimming World’s research cover? Slimming World is actively involved in internal and external research projects into the causes of and solutions to obesity.

There are four key themes to our research which are: • further developing our own programme and service to members; • producing evidence of the efficacy of our method, for weight loss and maintenance; • ongoing research to advance knowledge around sustainable weight management strategies such as the role of energy density and satiety, and the importance of mental and emotional well-being; • informing and responding to the public health agenda. 2/ How important is research in tackling the obesity crisis? Obesity is a complex and multi-layered issue that has an impact on physical and mental health and emotional wellbeing and we know that there is no silver bullet. 3/ What organisations does Slimming World work with to produce research?

We Communities. Public parks for public benefit. We’re at a turning point in public services. Many of the services we take for granted from our council are likely to face cuts, if not already reeling from existing reductions in budget. We need new ways of considering the resources we have in the community and what benefits that might bring. Yet this presents an opportunity as well as a challenge.

Through our work in the Centre for Social Action Innovation Fund and Cities of Service, we’ve seen many projects emerge to help keep the lights on (and the mowers running and the weeding done) by engaging people power, helping improve a sense of ownership, a greater connectedness with neighbours and the community and helping improve health and wellbeing. This is particularly true when it comes to maintaining public spaces and parks. Keep Britain Tidy 3 of our 7 Cities of Service are running Love Where You Live programmes, finding ways to support residents to take action on the things they care about in their area.

Whose role is it anyway? Five urban design mistakes that create unhealthy and inactive communities | Housing Network. We all want to be fit, healthy and happy but the best intentions – whether it’s to jog to the shops, eat a balanced diet or strike a better work-life balance – can often elude us. At least some of the blame can be laid at the feet of those who design the city spaces some of us call home. Many aspects of city living discourage the kinds of lifestyles that can contribute to our health and wellbeing. We know that car-dependent, city suburbs struggle to create neighbourhoods that encourage walking, but they’re not the only ones. Here are five mistakes that are often made when designing new developments in urban areas — and suggestions for how to create healthier communities.

Erecting too many fences, gates and barriers Getting up and out is often the first step in leading a healthier lifestyle. Failing to find out what residents really want Who better to identify the missing green space, unhealthy food and poor exercise facilities in a community than the people themselves? Urban commons have radical potential – it's not just about community gardens | Cities. It has become fashionable to talk about the “urban commons”, and it’s clear why. What we traditionally conceive of as “the public” is in retreat: public services are at the mercy of austerity policies, public housing is being sold off and public space is increasingly no such thing. In a relentlessly neoliberal climate, the commons seems to offer an alternative to the battle between public and private.

The idea of land or services that are commonly owned and managed speaks to a 21st-century sensibility of, to use some jargon, participative citizenship and peer-to-peer production. In theory, at least, the commons is full of radical potential. Why is it, then, that every time the urban commons is mentioned it is in reference to a community garden? England has a particular history of commoning that is still written into the fabric of London. This is a misunderstanding. In fact, it is often in moments of crisis that the idea of commons asserts itself. We must fight to make our cities healthy places to live | Owen Jones. Cities fit for people, rather than exhaust pipes; cities where residents are happier, have improved physical and mental wellbeing, sleep better, live longer.

In our age of deficit fetishism, the success of a policy is judged by its economic returns, rather than whether it improves the lives of living, breathing human beings. But a new study suggests that cities that invest in encouraging their citizens to be physically active reap both financial and human rewards. For every pound cities across the world invest in walking and cycling projects, for example, the returns average £13; here in Britain, it could be as high as £19. Investing in green spaces and public transport clears both the air and the roads, and makes cities pleasant places to live. Here’s a study that tells a story that has been badly told in the age of austerity. Take cycling. Alas, the investment is an early casualty of a Tory majority government, with George Osborne hacking away £23m.

We must fight to make our cities healthy places to live | Owen Jones. Cities fit for people, rather than exhaust pipes; cities where residents are happier, have improved physical and mental wellbeing, sleep better, live longer. In our age of deficit fetishism, the success of a policy is judged by its economic returns, rather than whether it improves the lives of living, breathing human beings. But a new study suggests that cities that invest in encouraging their citizens to be physically active reap both financial and human rewards. For every pound cities across the world invest in walking and cycling projects, for example, the returns average £13; here in Britain, it could be as high as £19. Investing in green spaces and public transport clears both the air and the roads, and makes cities pleasant places to live. Here’s a study that tells a story that has been badly told in the age of austerity.

Take cycling. A confession: after taking it up five years ago, I became an insufferable cycling evangelist. How can we rebuild trust in democracy? The recent general election saw the highest turnout since 1997, yet one in three people still chose not to vote. On Monday 1 June, we published research that found that only 25% of people trust Parliament, yet 50% trust the overall democratic process. Interestingly, trust improves at a more local level, with 93% of our survey respondents saying they trust other people in their community. So could increased involvement in community activity play a role in rebuilding trust in democracy? Volunteering in community activity both increases levels of trust and increases the likelihood of getting involved in social action. This is because community activity can provide people with a meaningful sense of influence over the things that matter to them. Take the Deputy Mayor we spoke to, who around 15 years ago set up a residential community association to give a voice to the residents on his housing estate.

Cities with physically active residents more productive as well as healthier | Cities. Cities in which residents are physically active have a big advantage over their more sedentary rivals, with better economic productivity, higher property values and improved school performance, as well as a healthier population. In an increasingly globalised, competitive and mobile world, cities have an economic imperative to promote walking, cycling and public transport, as well as increasing the amount of green space and curbing car use, according to a report from the University of California. The research examined more than 500 existing studies from 17 countries to seek an overall picture of the effect of increased physical activity on a city.

It found in particular that schemes to promote walking and cycling had a massive impact, with one UK study finding local trade can be boosted by up to 40% in an area where more people walk. Overall, the academics concluded, walking and cycling projects return an average of £13 ($20) in economic benefit for every £1 ($1.50) invested. Community Wellbeing | What Works | Wellbeing. How do the places we live, and our participation in local decision-making, influence personal and community wellbeing?

What does community wellbeing mean? What can be done to improve wellbeing by voluntary organisations, businesses, local and central government? These are some the questions that will be addressed by the communities evidence programme of the Wellbeing What Works Centre. There is lots of evidence already out there, but it is dispersed and in different formats, from analysis of large-scale international surveys, to qualitative evaluations of local projects.

In the first six months of the programme we will engage with a range of people whose work could be helped with wellbeing evidence and understand what kinds of questions they would like the evidence to help them answer. Throughout the programme, we’ll bring researchers and evidence users together, and produce outputs which are usable, relevant and robust. Lead investigator Co-investigaors Like this: Like Loading... Trust in Democracy: how community groups bridge the gap between people and politics. Government urged to let councils set tax rates on homes | Public Finance. In a report published today, think-thank CentreForum argued that reform was needed to address the issue of council tax values still being based on 1991 values, and to address calls for residents in higher-value properties to pay more. Both Labour and the Liberal Democrats were promising to bring in a mansion tax on properties worth more than £2m if they won the general election, which the think-tanks said was bad policy disguised as good politics’.

Today’s Moving beyond Mansion Tax report said that rather than adding the proposed mansion tax, the new government should instead reform council tax to make it a flat rate tax on the value of domestic properties. It argued that revamping council tax would strengthen the links between taxpayers and local services and be a fairer way of rebalancing UK property taxation than an annual tax on homes worth £2m. He added: ‘Rather than creating a new, complex and unfair tax, politicians should look to reform our existing property tax system.

FSEM News - (FSEM) Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine. 20 May 2015 The Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine UK (FSEM) welcomes a new bill by the French National Assembly requiring GPs to prescribe exercise for patients with diabetes, cancer or cardiovascular disease via publicly funded sports clubs. According the World Health Organisation (WHO) physical inactivity is one of the leading risk factors for health and is estimated to attribute to one million deaths (about 10 % of the total), per year in the WHO European Region. More than half of the Region's population is not active enough to meet health recommendations - 30 minutes/day of moderate activity on most week days.* Dr Roderick Jaques, President of the Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine UK comments: “Addressing the prevention, management and recovery from disease through prescribed exercise provides a fresh approach to avoidable diseases like cancer, diabetes, heart disease and many common musculo-skeletal conditions.

Ends **The FSEM The Nation’s Hidden Health Threat April 2015. Fat parents must 'shape up or face music', head of NHS warns. He said: “It’s a no brainer – pull out all the stops on prevention, or face the music.” The NHS chief was speaking alongside Prime Minister David Cameron who was announcing plans for thousands more doctors to help run a seven-day health service. In the excoriating attack, Mr Stevens took aim at the millions of overweight Britons who eat the wrong foods, smoke or drink too much and do not do enough exercise. He said: “But smoking still explains half the inequality in life expectancy between rich and poor - and two thirds of smokers get hooked as kids. “Binge drinking costs at least £5billion a year - in A&E admissions, road accidents, extra policing. “Junk food, sugary fizzy drinks and couch potato lifestyles are normalising obesity – and as parents, a third of us can’t now spot when our own child is seriously overweight.”

He added: “So we’ve got a choice. “And burden taxpayers with an NHS bill far exceeding an extra £8 billion by 2020? The good citizen. Disillusioned with the advertising business, Jon Alexander set up the New Citizenship Project to encourage a move away from consumption and toward participation. Whatever you do, don’t mention the word ‘consumer’ around Jon Alexander. While the term is liberally used in any conversation involving marketers and market researchers, often just a lazy catch-all shorthand, for Alexander it is terminology that should be prohibited. The reason for his absolutism is a moral argument twinned with a creative argument. “When you use the word ‘consumer’, you can’t help but think of people as having only one real line of agency – buying from you.

Use the word ‘citizens’ and you immediately think of people as having multiple lines of agency to participate, co-create, challenge, build and more,” he explains. “We think you can have a far more creative, generative society if we, the people, are allowed the space to think of ourselves as citizens, not just told we’re consumers constantly.” Career choices. Physiotherapists call for bigger role in delivering healthcare changes | Healthcare Professionals Network. Should you think that massage parlours are a strictly modern phenomenon, prepare to think again. There was a moral panic over the questionable practices of many such establishments as early as the end of the 19th century.

And out of that panic was born the profession of physiotherapy. A handful of women nurses who practised “medical rubbing”, and wished to set their work apart from more dubious forms of manipulation, set up the Society of Trained Masseuses in 1894. That became the Chartered Society of Massage and Medical Gymnastics in 1920, opening its doors to men, and in 1944 became the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP). Today there are more than 50,000 registered physiotherapists in the UK. “Physiotherapy as a profession, as a service, has so much to offer, yet is so underutilised by the system,” says CSP chief executive Karen Middleton.

Middleton wants to emulate the spirit of those pioneers who laid the groundwork for the profession. Why such dark foreboding? Eight things the new government should prioritise for the NHS | Healthcare Professionals Network. The dangers of eco-gentrification: what's the best way to make a city greener? | Cities. Prevention is better than cure if we want to save the NHS - Comment - Voices - The Independent. Landscape Institute. Green Society: Policies to improve the UK’s green spaces. Liberal Democrats' Five Green Laws will create a stronger economy and a fairer society - 27 Apr 2015. Green Spaces in the Liberal Democrat Manifesto — Greener, Cheaper. Birmingham capitalises on running to tackle obesity problem | UK news. Garden cities: can green spaces bring health and happiness? | Guardian Sustainable Business. The Parks Alliance comments on the Fabian Society’s new report, Places to Be : Pro Landscaper. Health Proposals | LGA 100 Days. Three million new volunteers?

Our Reaction To Party Manifestos. What the general election manifestos have in store for the voluntary sector | Voluntary Sector Network. Landscape Institute. Landscape Institute. Media and Resources - (FSEM) Faculty of Sport and Excercise Medicine. Make the NHS a well-being service not sickness service - health - 20 March 2015. Obesity and Physical Activity. NHS finances: A likely headache for the next government. What Works | Wellbeing | The development of the What Works Centre for Wellbeing. Five million patients to benefit from new era of patient care. Why we need to design more active lives. The future of local authority sport and leisure services: sport and/or health? Minister insists on local answer for parks. The future of local authority sport and leisure services: sport and/or health? Local Government Association | LGA 100 days. Landscape Institute. Landscape Institute. Theconversation. How to change our failing systems.

EXCLUSIVE: Fiscal fears rocket. Are health and wellbeing boards ready to play a bigger role? | Healthcare Professionals Network. The Biggest U.S. Study on Exercise Just Ran Out of Money - Bloomberg Business. Funding expensive treatments for some on the NHS means less money for everyone else. Global health agenda on non-communicable diseases: has WHO set a smart goal for physical activity? | The BMJ. 25 by 25 | World Heart Federation. Reconnecting health and planning. Not a new idea, just a good one. Food tax would fund public health, say councils. Alarming fall in school PE lessons casts doubt over government's commitment to tackling obesity crisis.

Government gives Green Gyms £475,000 to grow | The Conservation Volunteers. Natural Fixes – how nature can help solve some of society’s big problems… | Debbie Tann. About Us.