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Alteration Y chromosome

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Goodbye Y: Men Who Smoke Have Missing Male Chromosomes. Add another troubling side effect to the list of health issues caused by cigarettes: Smoking may cause the Y chromosome to disappear from men's blood cells. A new study finds that men who smoke lose the Y chromosome in blood cells more frequently than nonsmokers — and the heavier their cigarette use is, the fewer Y chromosomes they have. This Y chromosome loss could explain why male smokers are at higher risk of cancer than female smokers, the researchers said in their study, published today (Dec. 4) in the journal Science. "The cells that lose the Y chromosome … They don't die," said study co-author Lars Forsberg, of the Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology at Uppsala University in Sweden. "But we think that they would have a disrupted biological function. " More specifically, the immune cells in the blood that are tasked with fighting cancer may be hampered without their Y chromosome, Forsberg told Live Science.

[Macho Man: 10 Wild Facts About His Body] Cancer link? Men Who Smoke Be Missing Y Chromosomes. Add another troubling side effect to the list of health issues caused by cigarettes: Smoking may cause the Y chromosome to disappear from men's blood cells. A new study finds that men who smoke lose the Y chromosome in blood cells more frequently than nonsmokers — and the heavier their cigarette use is, the fewer Y chromosomes they have.

This Y chromosome loss could explain why male smokers are at higher risk of cancer than female smokers, the researchers said in their study, published today (Dec. 4) in the journal Science. Everything You Need To Know about the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse On Aug. 21, the moon will completely blot out the sun for observers in 12 states, from Oregon to South Carolina, in the first total solar eclipse visible from the United States mainland since 1979. "The cells that lose the Y chromosome … They don't die," said study co-author Lars Forsberg, of the Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology at Uppsala University in Sweden. The case of the missing Y. Smoking Can Erase Y Chromosome From Cells. Public health authorities have been handed their next anti-smoking campaign on a plate, at least when targeting men, with the discovery that smoking wipes out the chromosomes that determine genetic masculinity.

Earlier this year, a team led by Lars Fosberg and Jan P. Dumanski of Uppsala University tackled the question of why men develop more cancers that are not related to reproductive organs, and are more likely to die of them when they do. The authors note that “Age-related loss of chromosome Y is frequent in normal hematopoietic cells,” but that the consequences of this remain poorly understood. Fosberg and Dumanski found that the loss of Y chromosomes from blood cells occurred in 8.2% of elderly men in a sample of 1,153 and that those affected had life expectancies 5.5% shorter and three and half times the rate of cancer, after excluding haematological cancers. The effect increases the more one smokes. A%20Recipe%20for%20Traits_Public. Genetic Markers: Connecting the Dots. 1. Introduce the activity and build students' background about genetic markers. Tell students that they are going to engage in a hands-on activity that simulates how genetic markers (also called genetic signposts) are passed on from one population of humans to another.

Explain that mistakes occasionally happen when DNA is replicated, and that these mistakes can be passed from a person to his or her descendants. Information can get switched, dropped, or repeated. These mistakes are called mutations. Although we often think of mutations as being harmful, most mutations have no effect on an individual's survival. Because most mutations have no effect, they can become more and more common with each generation, and ultimately can be found in large proportions of a population. 2. Select 2-3 students to be the scientists, and have them leave the room. 3. Call the scientists back into the room. 4. Give the students in the scientist role an opportunity to work out a strategy on their own. 5.

How DNA Evidence Works - HowStuffWorks. The CBS drama "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation" routinely draws more than 20 million viewers per episode, making it one of television's greatest successes. The show's popularity owes a great deal to the writers and actors who bring the stories to life. But another intriguing element is the cutting-edge technology used by the Las Vegas crime lab trying to solve crimes.

Collecting and analyzing DNA evidence tops the list of the lab's forensic toolkit, and its ubiquity in shows like "CSI" and "Cold Case" has increased public awareness to the point that many jurors in real-world courtrooms expect to see DNA evidence presented -- whether a case calls for it or not. It's hard to believe that DNA evidence has come so far so fast. The techniques that make it possible to identify a suspect using his or her unique genetic blueprint have only been around since 1985. That's when Alec Jeffreys and his colleagues in England first demonstrated the use of DNA in a criminal investigation.

Men Who Smoke Be Missing Y Chromosomes. The Genographic Project - This is Who We Are. Y Quit? Smoking Destroys Male Chromosome. Robert Vondracek has had multiple sclerosis for 20 years. His speech is starting to slur and he's been having more trouble getting around, and when he heard about a controversial stem cell therapy that might help, he got excited. "I heard about the stem cell treatments being done right here in Phoenix," said Vondracek, 61. "It shocked me because it was not approved in this country, I didn't think. " The therapy was offered by an Arizona plastic surgeon who gives the stem cell treatments in the same clinic where he does cosmetic procedures. But when Vondracek's neurologist heard about his interest in the therapy, which would cost $7,000 per treatment, "He went crazy," said Vondracek. He strongly advised Vondracek against it. Plastic surgeons, other doctors and naturopaths at more than 100 clinics round the country are charging thousands of dollars for a controversial procedure called stem cell therapy to treat a range of disorders, including neurological diseases like MS and Parkinson's.

Dr. Your Testicles Contain More Diverse Proteins Than Any Other Human Organ. Almost twenty five years ago, an ambitious international research project was initiated whose goal was to identify and map all of our genes. It took thirteen years to complete the Human Genome Project (HGP), which eventually revealed that we have around 20,000 genes that contain instructions for the production of proteins, or protein coding genes. Proteins are essential components of all living things. They are some of the most structurally complex and functionally sophisticated molecules known to man, and they participate in virtually every process within cells. Although all cells in the body have the same DNA sequences, they don’t all express, or produce, the same proteins. The collection of proteins produced in our bodies is known as the proteome, and while thousands of different proteins have been identified over the years, a comprehensive atlas of the proteins produced in different areas of the body did not exist.

[Via New Scientist, BBC News and The Human Protein Atlas]