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The Absolutely True Adventures of a School Librarian: Shared On Social Media: End of Year Reports. While surfing social media sites I come across great posts with equally insightful comments. Unfortunately, trying to locate these posts in the stream months later is often an impossible task. Thus, in lieu of waiting for the original poster to blog their thoughts, I am starting a series here entitled "Shared On Social Media" so that I can find the information I found useful later.

All credit will be given to the original poster and commenters. None of these posts are my original thoughts. Posted to the Future Ready Librarians Facebook Group on June 9, 2017 by Brad Malone. As a LMS turned administrator, I have spent a lot of time looking at all of your end reports and wondering what I would think or feel if I received one from any of the LMS I oversee. I thought some of you may rethink or reshape parts of yours based on my general feedback.

Who is the audience? As is so often the case, when I'm struggling with a LMS issue I turn to Doug Johnson. I hope no one finds this insulting. How to Fix the 15 Most Common Infographic Design Mistakes. Infographic design is no different than any other type of visual content design. It’s not just there to make things look pretty; it’s there to help tell the story. According to MIT, the brain can process visual information in as little as 13 milliseconds, which is why infographics are such an effective tool—if done well. Infographic design plays a huge role in how you communicate your story, but too often we see design that does a disservice to the content. Whether it’s too cluttered or too confusing, bad design is one of the biggest threats to your infographic’s success. 15 Common Infographic Design Mistakes Remember: The number one goal in infographic design is to enhance the story through design. 1) Incorrect or Weak Data Visualization As data visualization geeks, this might be our biggest pet peeve in infographics.

The Fix: Brush up on your data skills to make the most impact. 2) Endless Length 3) Visual Clutter 4) No Visual Language 5) Too Much Typography 6) No Clear Heirarchy. 6 Ways to Get the Bullshit Out of Your Data Visualization. Good data storytelling can do wonders. It helps you find interesting insights. It helps you tell unique stories that people want to hear. And with beautiful data visualization, you can deliver that story, no matter how complex, in an easy-to-digest package. This is why data visualization is such a useful tool—and why it’s become so popular. But like many things, the more people do it, the more mistakes get made.

At the very least, bad data visualization is a nuisance. 1) Use Really Good Data Good data storytelling starts with good data. It comes from a solid source: Data can be tricky because it can be easily misrepresented or inaccurately collected by organizations with an agenda. 2) Tell the Full Story It’s tempting to hone in on a single data point that supports a pre-conceived narrative, but if it doesn’t really fall in line with what the data is telling you, don’t present it as such. 3) Choose the Right Chart 4) Don’t Make Your Reader Do More Work 5) Ditch BS Chart Junk. New HOW TO PICK THE BEST DATA VISUALIZATION FORMAT FOR YOUR STORY. How to Pick the Best Data Visualization Format For Your Story “If you want to tell a powerful story, data is the way to go. Whether it’s proprietary data, industry research, or public data, there are compelling stories all around. But even the best data story can lose impact if it isn’t presented the right way. That’s why it’s so important to choose the right data visualization format for your data.

We find that there is a lot of misinformation or misunderstanding around this topic. Many people think that throwing a few charts and graphs into an article is all they need to tell a good data story. Or they think they can stuff a trillion data points into an infographic and call it a day. We want you to tell the best data stories you can, so we’re breaking down the different types of storytelling formats to help you choose the best for your data. Before we dive in, let’s clear up a few terms to specify what we’re talking about. Motion graphic: These are animated graphics that tell a story. How to Pick the Best Data Visualization Format For Your Story. If you want to tell a powerful story, data is the way to go.

Whether it’s proprietary data, industry research, or public data, there are compelling stories all around. But even the best data story can lose impact if it isn’t presented the right way. That’s why it’s so important to choose the right data visualization format for your data. We find that there is a lot of misinformation or misunderstanding around this topic. Many people think that throwing a few charts and graphs into an article is all they need to tell a good data story. We want you to tell the best data stories you can, so we’re breaking down the different types of storytelling formats to help you choose the best for your data. Data Visualization Formats/Tools Before we dive in, let’s clear up a few terms to specify what we’re talking about. Data visualization: In the strictest sense, this refers to the actual visual representation of data. Infographic: An infographic is a graphic that includes data, copy, and visuals.

Why Your Annual Report Should Be a Piece of Master Storytelling. The annual report is a once-a-year piece of content that’s mandatory for many organizations and a powerful tool for many more. While it can be tedious to assemble, it’s incredibly important. This single piece of communication presents a wealth of information about your organization to many different audiences. How those readers engage with that content affects their perceptions of your business in significant ways. If your annual report is simply slapped together as a statement of facts, you are losing a huge opportunity to bolster your brand.

The purpose of your annual report Your annual report is more than a legal requirement. Stakeholders/shareholdersEmployeesPotential employeesIndustry colleagues and competitorsGeneral public Each person will read your annual report for a different reason, and each will take away something different. Some of the most significant things your annual report helps you do: Share your mission. Build trust in your business practices. Showcase company culture. The BSMS Libratory Year in Review: 2015 - 2016 - Bunhead With Duct Tape: Making Learning Stick. Mrs. ReaderPants: Top 25 checkouts for 2015-2016. School Library Annual Reports. Measure the Future. School Library Annual Reports: Connecting the Dots Between Your Library And Student Learning.

My last principal used to call May "the month of mayhem. " And for good reason. In the northern hemisphere anyway, May means warmer weather, antsy students (and teachers), testing, testing (and more testing), and a rapidly approaching end to yet another school year. For me, however, May also meant the creation of my annual report. Annual reports were never required in my district or by my principal, but after seeing the work of other librarians whose districts did require these types of reflections, I knew I wanted to make completing one for my library a part of my year end routine.

Why in the world would I want to add this to my already full end of year plate? Assuming others know what you do is stupid silly. As part of this process, I shared several examples of school library annual reports in multiple formats - some are documents, some are webpages and some are videos. As you might expect, there were a wide variety of grades along with lots and lots of dialogue. Annual Report Kachel. EBSCOhost Login. Infographic: Monthly Library Report | Informania.

“Hello. My name is Fran, and I am an overachiever.” What else explains why I never seem to be satisfied? I have been on a quest to improve my monthly library reports since 2010 as discussed here, here, and here. I had been using Word to create my reports but changed to PowerPoint this year. I have found that I can create and edit charts so much easier with PowerPoint. And I have been fairly pleased with my monthly reports.

I am a fan of infographics, so this morning when I saw this tweet from Sassy Librarian, I had to play: Piktochart Pikochart provides both free and upgraded accounts; as always, I opt for free. Once you choose a template, you can change the mood (Colour Scheme, Fonts, and Background Styles) and then begin editing. Not too bad for a first try, but since I am an overachiever….. Like this: Like Loading... Extreme Monthly Library Report Makeover. Since opening my library in August of 2006, I have compiled a monthly report as part of my efforts to share what is happening with the library program and as a tool for reflection and action. I have always completed paper reports using Microsoft Word and posted them on the library website as Word document or Adobe Acrobat PDF; each year, I have added tweaks and additional data.

Last year’s reports (you can see here or here) represented a somewhat dramatic improvement as I incorporated more images, improved graphic design, some additional quantitative data, and a correlation of collaborative lessons (and the accompanying research pathfinders) to assorted standards, including AASL, ISTE, and state performance standards (Georgia Performance Standards or GPS). While I was pleased with the monthly reports and the culminating annual report for 2008-09, I wanted to add more depth and dimension for this school year to better illustrate what is happening with the library program. Like this: EBSCOhost Login.

Sample Reports

Reporting tools.