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National Women In Engineering Day: 'My dad said architecture wasn't for girls. Boy I proved him wrong' From my first day I was entranced and decades later I still am.

National Women In Engineering Day: 'My dad said architecture wasn't for girls. Boy I proved him wrong'

Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg: 'I want women to be paid more' It took Sheryl Sandberg a long time – "too long" – to realise she was a feminist, and even longer to say it out loud.

Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg: 'I want women to be paid more'

As chief operating officer of Facebook, she is among the most high-profile executives in the world, the more so for being female. Most of those in her position, she says, barely admit to being women, let alone feminists, so her decision to publish Lean In, a book of feminist advice for women in the workplace, constitutes a radical departure.

Female academics pay a heavy baby penalty. Photo by Cristi M/iStockphoto/Thinkstock In 2000, I greeted the first entering graduate-student class at Berkeley where the women outnumbered the men.

Female academics pay a heavy baby penalty

I was the first female dean of the graduate division. As a ’70s feminist I cautiously thought, “Is the revolution over? Have we won?” The Unspoken Stigma of Workplace Flexibility. “Do Women Have Too Many Rights?" Abby Johnson's Dangerous Message Delivered With Sugar. If Abby Johnson, former Texas Planned Parenthood Director-cum-pro-life maven, came to your event, she would respect your rights.

“Do Women Have Too Many Rights?" Abby Johnson's Dangerous Message Delivered With Sugar

That’s what she said last Thursday night over the shouts of rowdy pro-choice protestors who were packed into an auditorium at the University of Washington to hear her speak on the topic: “Do Women Have Too Many Rights? “ And you know what? I believe her. The hollers and eventual scuffles didn’t subside once during her hour-long talk, and plans for a post-talk Q&A were aborted as a very pregnant Johnson exited early, flanked by campus police. Argentinian sex workers take to the walls. A series of Argentinian advertisements for sex workers’ rights has been making a small but well-deserved splash.

Argentinian sex workers take to the walls

Prostitution is legal in Argentina but brothels are not, and, without labor protections, sex workers are vulnerable to physical violence and economic exploitation. Commissioned by the Argentinian sex workers’ union, Asociación de Mujeres Meretrices de Argentina, the wheat paste ads cover the corners of buildings. A view from one side displays a woman in a suggestive pose, but the full image reveals a family scene: a mother leading her kids home in their school gear, or a baby pushed in a stroller. The text reminds us that “86% of sex workers are mothers. We need a law to regulate our work.”

I worry about the use of maternity to justify the need for protection: we hear often enough already that a woman’s worth is wholly dependent on her ability and willingness to bear and mother children. Images via BuzzFeed. Game Of Thrones' George RR Martin Is 'Feminist at Heart' Tips for Keeping your Tenement Tidy (in 1911) Mabel Hyde Kittredge, activist and founder of the hot lunch program for public schools in New York, was the Martha Stewart of tenement living. She championed the cause of domestic science for the disadvantaged at her "housekeeping centers"—model apartments where young girls from the crowded tenements could, by observing and doing, learn all the particulars of home management.

Her 1911 book, How to Furnish and Keep House in a Tenement Flat, was organized as a series of lessons to be used at the housekeeping centers in New York or in other cities which had started to establish centers of their own. The young girls who took the courses were meant to see the model apartments as "an illustration of the sanitation and beauty which lie within reach of the laborer's income. " But in order to achieve that sanitation and beauty, there was an awful lot of work to be done. Kittredge acknowledged that "housework can be very dull," but she emphasized that "when it becomes an art, it is interesting. Miss Representation. Magazine - Why Women Still Can’t Have It All. It’s time to stop fooling ourselves, says a woman who left a position of power: the women who have managed to be both mothers and top professionals are superhuman, rich, or self-employed.

Magazine - Why Women Still Can’t Have It All

If we truly believe in equal opportunity for all women, here’s what has to change. Eighteen months into my job as the first woman director of policy planning at the State Department, a foreign-policy dream job that traces its origins back to George Kennan, I found myself in New York, at the United Nations’ annual assemblage of every foreign minister and head of state in the world. On a Wednesday evening, President and Mrs. Obama hosted a glamorous reception at the American Museum of Natural History. I sipped champagne, greeted foreign dignitaries, and mingled. Science: It’s a sexist thing #sciencegirlthing.

The best of non-profit advertising and marketing for social causes Posted by Tom Megginson | 26-06-2012 23:19 | Category: Women's Issues It was the marketing fail heard round the world, and I got a call this morning at my office asking me what the problem was.

Science: It’s a sexist thing #sciencegirlthing

'Science: It's a Girl Thing!' - Insipid Ad. Turns Out Being Born a Woman Is a Major Financial Mistake. I can't understand why so many Americans think their health care system is better than ours here in the UK, where the National Health Service is paid for out of general taxation.

Turns Out Being Born a Woman Is a Major Financial Mistake

The more you earn, the more you pay. If you earn less or nothing at all, you pay less or nothing at all - and you're still entitled to the health care you need. Women don't pay more.