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English and Early Childhood

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Links, webpages, articles and videos derived from the future learn course and my own findings.

The magic of child-directed play. Scientists Say Child's Play Helps Build A Better Brain : NPR Ed. Deion Jefferson, 10, and Samuel Jefferson, 7, take turns climbing and jumping off a stack of old tires at the Berkeley Adventure Playground in California.

Scientists Say Child's Play Helps Build A Better Brain : NPR Ed

The playground is a half-acre park with a junkyard feel where kids are encouraged to "play wild. " David Gilkey/NPR hide caption toggle caption David Gilkey/NPR. The cognitive benefits of play: Effects on the learning brain. © 2008 - 2014, Gwen Dewar, Ph.D., all rights reserved Science supports many of our intuitions about the benefits of play.

The cognitive benefits of play: Effects on the learning brain

Playful behavior appears to have positive effects on the brain and on a child’s ability to learn. In fact, play may function as an important, if not crucial, mode for learning. Want specifics? Here are some examples. Animal experiments: Play improves memory and stimulates the growth of the cerebral cortex In 1964, Marion Diamond and her colleagues published an exciting paper about brain growth in rats. When researchers examined the rats’ brains, they discovered that the “enriched" rats had thicker cerebral cortices than did the “impoverished" rats (Diamond et al 1964).

Subsequent research confirmed the results—rats raised stimulating environments had bigger brains. Why play-based learning? (free article) - Early Childhood Australia. ‘ … for the EYLF to be implemented properly, all early childhood educators need to know what play is, why it is important, how to implement and assess a play-based program and their role in it.’

Why play-based learning? (free article) - Early Childhood Australia

Questioning practice The Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF) is built on the understanding that the principles of early childhood pedagogy (DEEWR, 2009, pp. 12-13) guide the practice of early childhood educators. Different types play. Learning through play ey. Play based learning statement EN. ThePowerofPlay. Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Text in PDF Format Adopted and opened for signature, ratification and accession by General Assembly resolution 44/25 of 20 November 1989 entry into force 2 September 1990, in accordance with article 49 Preamble The States Parties to the present Convention, Considering that, in accordance with the principles proclaimed in the Charter of the United Nations, recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world,

Convention on the Rights of the Child

Different types play. Importance of play for babies & children. Play is more than just fun for babies and children.

Importance of play for babies & children

It’s how they learn, and how they work out who they are, how the world works and where they fit into it. You can read this article in a selection of languages other than English. The importance of play Playing is one of the most important things you can do with your child. The time you spend playing together gives your child lots of different ways and times to learn. How young children learn English through play. As we release Learning Time with Timmy – our first app for early-years learners of English – Danitza Villarroel, a teacher on our Learning Time with Shaun and Timmy course in Chile, explains the importance of learning through play, and offers a few tips for teachers new to this age group.

How young children learn English through play

Teaching English to pre-school children can be daunting for teachers new to this age group. Young children have shorter attention spans than older children and adults, and they're still learning their mother tongue. But teaching these learners can be enormously rewarding once you've taken a few basic principles on board. ZERO TO THREE. 6 Types of Play: How Children's Play Becomes More Social. Play is a serious business.

6 Types of Play: How Children's Play Becomes More Social

The pioneering developmental psychologist Lev Vygotsky thought that, in the preschool years, play is the leading source of development. Getting the right balance between adult-led and child-initiated learning. Deb Roy: The birth of a word. Listen to Your Mother. Young children face a remarkable challenge in learning to use the language of their culture.

Listen to Your Mother

Toddlers vary widely, however, in the rate at which they learn new words.1 A team of Harvard Graduate School of Education researchers set out to ask whether and how children's language environment can impact vocabulary development. Why does my toddler love repetition? Paediatric speech and language therapist.

Why does my toddler love repetition?

It may test your patience when your toddler demands 'Row, row, row your boat' for the 10th time. But there's a good reason for her insistence. Toddlers love repetition because it helps them to learn, and because it's familiar and comforting. From around the age of two, you will notice your toddler repeating the same words and phrases constantly. By the time she's three, she will also demand her favourite stories and nursery rhymes over and over again. Through repeating things, your toddler is able to take in new information each time. And she will love stories and nursery rhymes with repeated phrases, because she can join in. A small study has found that repetition of stories may help children to learn new words. After hearing her favourite book many times, your toddler may even remember it well enough to add the endings to some of the sentences. The Woman Who Changed Her Brain: Barbara Arrowsmith-Young at TEDxToronto.

Early Childhood Care and Education. UNESCO’s activities in ECCE focus on influencing policies and practices through evidence-based advocacy, knowledge generation and sharing, capacity-building and technical assistance.

Early Childhood Care and Education

These include work in specific areas such as teachers, monitoring and integration. UNESCO collaborates with government officials and other key stakeholders concerned with the care and education of young children aged 0-8. As this age bracket covers children in various developmental stages, it is naturally difficult for countries to address all children within this group simultaneously and equally. Prioritization is necessary. In this regard, UNESCO’s ECCE programmes focus on holistic pre-primary education for children over the age of 3, emphasizing its linkages with primary education while ensuring the use of developmentally appropriate pedagogies. To address the needs of the under-threes, UNESCO promotes phasing and partnership as key strategies.

Development Matters FINAL PRINT AMENDED. Transcript of English in Early Years Facebook Discussion. How Children Learn to Talk. Have you ever wondered how children learn to talk? Many people, when asked that question, respond that they do it by imitating. This is at least partially true. Without imitation, we couldn't account for the fact that children in Texas usually learn Texan English, children in Paris usually learn Parisian French, and not vice versa. But imitation as an answer doesn't take us very far.

For one thing, children routinely say things they've never heard: "Mommy, come quick—Waldo swallowed a frog! " At this point some would amend their position to say that children don't imitate others sentence by sentence. Does being bilingual make you smarter? Language teacher and researcher Miguel Angel Muñoz explains the latest research on how being bilingual affects your brain, ahead of a British Council seminar in Cardiff on whether learning a foreign language makes you smarter. You can watch the live-streamed seminar Opens in a new tab or window. on Tuesday, 3 June. More than half the world's population uses two or more languages every day It is hard to estimate the exact number of bilingual people in the world, as there is a lack of reliable statistics Opens in a new tab or window..

But in 2012, a Eurobarometer survey Opens in a new tab or window. established that 'just over half of Europeans (54%)' are bilingual, and other studies Opens in a new tab or window. hypothesise that more than half of the world’s population is bilingual. So what about you? Patricia Kuhl: The linguistic genius of babies. Alison Gopnik: What do babies think?