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The Looming Energy Shock | Peak Prosperity. Slavoj Žižek: Why There Are No Viable Political Alternatives to Unbridled Capitalism. Floral tributes: still life paintings bloom into 3D – in pictures | Art and design. Oppia - Home. Music programs. A Retromatic History of Music (or Love) Virtual Musical Instruments: play the guitar, piano, drums and flute. Visualization. Explain Everything. Open. The 10 Principles of Burning Man | Burning Man. Burning Man co-founder Larry Harvey wrote the Ten Principles in 2004 as guidelines for the newly-formed Regional Network. They were crafted not as a dictate of how people should be and act, but as a reflection of the community’s ethos and culture as it had organically developed since the event’s inception.

Radical Inclusion Anyone may be a part of Burning Man. We welcome and respect the stranger. No prerequisites exist for participation in our community. Gifting Burning Man is devoted to acts of gift giving. The value of a gift is unconditional. Gifting does not contemplate a return or an exchange for something of equal value. Decommodification In order to preserve the spirit of gifting, our community seeks to create social environments that are unmediated by commercial sponsorships, transactions, or advertising.

Radical Self-reliance Burning Man encourages the individual to discover, exercise and rely on his or her inner resources. Civic Responsibility We value civil society. Pranav Mistry: The thrilling potential of SixthSense technology. How to Avoid Work: A 1949 Guide to Doing What You Love. By Maria Popova “Life really begins when you have discovered that you can do anything you want.” “There is an ugliness in being paid for work one does not like,” Anaïs Nin wrote in her diary in 1941. Indeed, finding a sense of purpose and doing what makes the heart sing is one of the greatest human aspirations — and yet too many people remain caught in the hamster wheel of unfulfilling work.

In 1949, career counselor William J. Reilly penned How To Avoid Work (public library) — a short guide to finding your purpose and doing what you love. Reilly begins by exploring the mythologies of work and play, something Lewis Hyde has written of beautifully, with an uncomfortable but wonderfully apt metaphor: Most [people] have the ridiculous notion that anything they do which produces an income is work — and that anything they do outside ‘working’ hours is play. I flew the Atlantic because I wanted to. Echoing Alan Watts’s litmus test of what you would do if money were no object, Reilly suggests: Bret Victor, beast of burden. Bret Victor - Media for Thinking the Unthinkable. Bret Victor - Inventing on Principle. GoConqr - Changing the way you learn. Sett | The blog that builds your audience. Making Music - 74 Creative Strategies for Producers.

We’ve all been there: opening a new Live Set, pondering the blank slate of an empty Session View window, wondering how to begin. Or, not knowing how to get from that first spark of inspiration to a finished piece of music. The fact is, despite all the music tools and technology at our disposal nowadays, making music remains as difficult as ever. Why this is, and what you can do about it is the subject of a new book entitled Making Music - 74 Creative Strategies for Electronic Music Producers. While the author, Dennis DeSantis, is Ableton’s Head of Documentation, the book is not an expanded Live user’s manual. Instead, as the title implies, it’s meant to help you actually make music – with concrete tips for solving musical problems, making progress, and (most importantly) finishing what you start – regardless of the software or hardware you use.

King Britt I've always been attracted to the way Cage and Eno use limitations and parameters as a way to push the creative flow. Kindness Doseone. Designing and marketing an appealing online course on udemy.com. A few years ago I came across one challenging statement on a LinkedIn forum. The participants were discussing the process of online teaching – how to get started, how to scale it, what platforms to use for webinars or online lessons, etc. They went back and forth talking about the advantages and disadvantages of using Skype and other similar applications, and then somebody posted a comment that etched into my memory and made me acutely aware of where I was and where I had to be.

The person said something like, “Limiting yourself to teaching only skype lessons is a dead-end street. You need to have something more if you would like to scale your business.” I know a lot of online teachers who have been entertaining the idea of designing online courses, but they may lack a bit of confidence and some practical information on whether or not this venture is worth the effort. In this post I’m going to share my own experience of designing online courses through Udemy.com. Start small.Start free. Creativity Innovation Genius. The journey approach to change.

A book title that reassures me is The Myth of Laziness. Author Mel Levine argues that when children fail at school, it’s unlikely that laziness is the cause. More often they’re bumping into a specific difficulty that blocks progress. It’s hard for any child to stay motivated if they keep failing at something. But if you can find out what their difficulty is, and attend to that, you can often help them become re-engaged. The same is true for adults. I find this helpful when I’m struggling. A lesson I take from Dr Levine’s work is that our responses to failure are powerfully influenced by the story we tell ourselves about its cause.

“If you’ve ever felt blocked by the thought ‘I could never do that’, imagine what might happen if you refused to be held back and took the first steps” A breakthrough with my writing came when a journalist friend told me about the stage of disbelief she experiences. Fixed vs. Growth: The Two Basic Mindsets That Shape Our Lives. “If you imagine less, less will be what you undoubtedly deserve,” Debbie Millman counseled in one of the best commencement speeches ever given, urging: “Do what you love, and don’t stop until you get what you love. Work as hard as you can, imagine immensities…” Far from Pollyanna platitude, this advice actually reflects what modern psychology knows about how belief systems about our own abilities and potential fuel our behavior and predict our success. Much of that understanding stems from the work of Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck, synthesized in her remarkably insightful Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (public library) — an inquiry into the power of our beliefs, both conscious and unconscious, and how changing even the simplest of them can have profound impact on nearly every aspect of our lives.

One of the most basic beliefs we carry about ourselves, Dweck found in her research, has to do with how we view and inhabit what we consider to be our personality. Mind maths: Five laws that rule the brain. Cookies on the New Scientist website close Our website uses cookies, which are small text files that are widely used in order to make websites work more effectively. To continue using our website and consent to the use of cookies, click away from this box or click 'Close' Find out about our cookies and how to change them Log in Your login is case sensitive I have forgotten my password close My New Scientist Look for Science Jobs Mind maths: Five laws that rule the brain (Image: Dan Page) How could an equation or formula ever hope to capture something as complex and beautiful as the human mind? Small world with big connections The brain is highly interconnected, with a networked architecture that makes the perfect platform for our mental gymnasticsRead more Your brain teeters on the edge of chaos How come the cascades of impulses that spread throughout the brain don't turn into out-of-control avalanches?

Your personal prediction machine Battles for attention fought in the brain The sum of consciousness. 100 Tools For Teachers. Here are 100 tools to make teachers lives easier, most are free and all are allowed to be used in the classroom Organization & Collaboration Save your bookmarks, collaborate with colleagues, and stay in touch with parents using these web tools. Search Engines & Directories Make use of these search engines and directories that offer the best of the web. Google Google is known for its useful web tools, but did you know that a lot of them have incredible applications for education?

Take a look at these Google tools to see how they’ll work for your classroom. Templates & Lesson Plans These simple tools will make your job just a little bit easier. Student information roster: Download this PDF to have student information easily at hand.Lesson Plans Library: Discovery Education offers a wide variety of lesson plans, from Ancient History to Economics.Record-Keeping Template: This chart is useful for a wide variety of applications, including permission slip checkoffs, parent communication, and more. Arts. The Epic BYOD Toolchest (51 Tools You Can Use Now) PowerSchool Learning: (Previously Haiku Learning.) This is a full learning management system (LMS) that I’m trying to get our school to adopt.

It’s multiplatform and robust, which makes it a great fit for our BYOD environment. It also works on top of Google Classroom, so I have all those features too, plus my grade book. Google Classroom: Teachers are moving in droves to Google Classroom. While it doesn’t have all the features of a full-scale LMS, teachers are giving students assignments and so much more with this awesome tool. Sophia: A favorite of my friend Todd Nesloney, this is a basic tool to share a lesson or two. I started with this tool before going to PowerSchool Learning. There are many other content-sharing platforms, like Moodle, Canvas, and CourseSites.

Screencasting and Capturing What Happens in Class If you’re going to share and interact with your students in the electronic and physical spaces (as you should), you must learn how to screencast. Cloud Syncing Expression. Why Storytelling Will Be the Biggest Business Skill of the Next 5 Years. This is a guest post by Shane Snow, chief content officer at Contently, a New York company that connects freelance journalists with corporate assignments. The article first appeared on the Content Strategist blog. In 2012, a pale woman with crazy eyebrows and a keytar strapped to her back made a video of herself, wearing a kimono and holding up hand-Sharpied signs on a street in Melbourne. One by one, the signs flipped, explaining that the woman had spent the last 4 years writing songs. She was a musician, and had parted ways with her record label, which had said the cost of her next album would be a whopping $500,000.

She and her band mates were very happy to no longer be with the label, and had worked hard to create some great new music and art. But they couldn’t finish producing the record on their own. She needed people’s help to get it off the ground and to make what was now her business — independent music — work. “This is the future of music,” one of her signs read. Our loss of wisdom - Barry Schwartz. Chamber of Commonwealth.