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Learned helplessness - Wikipedia. Learned helplessness is behavior typical of a human or non-human animal and occurs where an animal endures repeatedly painful or otherwise aversive stimuli which it is unable to escape or avoid.

Learned helplessness - Wikipedia

After such experience, the organism often fails to learn or accept "escape" or "avoidance" in new situations where such behavior would likely be effective. In other words, the organism learned that it is helpless in situations where there is a presence of aversive stimuli and has accepted that it has lost control, and thus gives up trying.

Such an organism is said to have acquired learned helplessness.[1][2] Learned helplessness theory is the view that clinical depression and related mental illnesses may result from such real or perceived absence of control over the outcome of a situation. [3] Miura fold - Wikipedia. Crease pattern for a Miura fold.

Miura fold - Wikipedia

The parallelograms of this example have 84° and 96° angles. The Miura fold (ミウラ折り, Miura-ori?) King Lear - Wikipedia. "King Lear and the Fool in the Storm" by William Dyce (1806–1864) King Lear is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare.

King Lear - Wikipedia

It depicts the gradual descent into madness of the title character, after he disposes of his kingdom giving bequests to two of his three daughters based on their flattery of him, bringing tragic consequences for all. Derived from the legend of Leir of Britain, a mythological pre-Roman Celtic king, the play has been widely adapted for the stage and motion pictures, with the title role coveted by many of the world's most accomplished actors. The first attribution to Shakespeare of this play, originally drafted in 1605 or 1606 at the latest with its first known performance on St. Stephen's Day in 1606, was a 1608 publication in a quarto of uncertain provenance; it may be an early draft or simply reflect the first performance text.

Characters[edit] Synopsis[edit] Lear announces he will live alternately with Goneril and Regan, and their husbands. Sources[edit] R. John F. Watership Down - Wikipedia. Watership Down is a classic adventure novel, written by English author Richard Adams, published by Rex Collings Ltd of London in 1972.

Watership Down - Wikipedia

Set in southern England, the story features a small group of rabbits. Although they live in their natural environment, they are anthropomorphised, possessing their own culture, language, proverbs, poetry, and mythology. Evoking epic themes, the novel follows the rabbits as they escape the destruction of their warren and seek a place to establish a new home, encountering perils and temptations along the way. Origin and publication history[edit] The title refers to the rabbits' destination, Watership Down, a hill in the north of Hampshire, England, near the area where Adams grew up. —Dedication, Watership Down Watership Down was rejected seven times before it was accepted by Rex Collings.[14] The one-man London publisher Collings wrote to an associate, "I've just taken on a novel about rabbits, one of them with extra-sensory perception.

Plot summary[edit] Bahá'í Faith - Wikipedia. The Bahá'í Faith (Persian: Bahā'i ; بهائی‎‎) is a monotheistic religion which emphasizes the spiritual unity of all humankind.

Bahá'í Faith - Wikipedia

Three core principles establish a basis for Bahá'í teachings and doctrine: the unity of God, that there is only one God who is the source of all creation; the unity of religion, that all major religions have the same spiritual source and come from the same God; and the unity of humanity, that all humans have been created equal, coupled with the unity in diversity, that diversity of race and culture are seen as worthy of appreciation and acceptance.

According to the Bahá'í Faith's teachings, the human purpose is to learn to know and to love God through such methods as prayer, reflection, and being of service to humanity. The Bahá'í Faith was founded by Bahá'u'lláh in 19th-century Persia. Bahá'u'lláh was imprisoned and exiled from Persia to the Ottoman Empire because of his association with the Babi movement. Paper tiger - Wikipedia. Paper tiger is a literal English translation of the Chinese phrase zhilaohu (紙老虎).

Paper tiger - Wikipedia

The term refers to something that seems threatening but is ineffectual and unable to withstand challenge. The expression became well known in the West as a slogan used by Mao Zedong's Chinese communist state against its opponents, particularly the U.S. government. Etymology[edit] "Paper tiger" was an ancient phrase used in Chinese culture.

It was translated into English in a work by John Francis Davis before 1836.[1] Use[edit] In a 1956 interview with American journalist Anna Louise Strong, Mao Zedong used the phrase "paper tiger" to describe American imperialism: "In appearance it is very powerful but in reality it is nothing to be afraid of; it is a paper tiger. In The Resistance to Theory (1982), Paul de Man used the phrase to reflect upon the threat of literary theory to traditional literary scholarship in American academia.