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This Dog Is Made Entirely of Sprinkles. Most Amazing Sand Sculptures. Most Amazing Sand Sculptures Anyone who has ever been to the beach has probably tried to sculpt a simple sand structure of some sort.Well leave it to the pros, because we have some great sand sculpture pictures listed below. 36 Comments: rachael said...

Most Amazing Sand Sculptures

I've tried making sandcastles before.. I suck. April 16, 2010 at 11:59 AM shahid said... nice arts May 25, 2010 at 3:07 AM jalalHB said... This is simply classic and aesthetics May 7, 2011 at 7:00 PM Anonymous said... Harrison Hot Springs, in BC Canada,I recognized multiple pieces of art from there :D September 4, 2011 at 1:02 PM Impressive! September 13, 2011 at 7:51 PM where's the rest of them? September 19, 2011 at 1:47 AM ZuZu Gold said... remarkable. September 20, 2011 at 11:43 AM That's a stupid introduction... September 22, 2011 at 7:26 AM amazing, I remember when I was a little girl making sad sculptures, even during the winter I would make snow animals, haha! September 27, 2011 at 2:02 PM Annunci Incontri Roma said... The first one is my favorite. Leaf Cut Art by Lorenzo Durán.

Viewing Entry - 'SOCIETY'. Florentijn Hofman. Fremont-troll.jpg (JPEG Image, 600x453 pixels) Still life: Bent objects. UPDATE: The Return of Bent Objects Wires transform these objects from inanimate to hilarious works of art.

Still life: Bent objects

Little polish girl McDonalds as Sculpture Materials Yeah, this is where those come from Dancing Queens English breakfast Sylvia Muffin put her head in the oven. The introvert Bananas in bed – let’s slip into bed together. One man, 100,000 toothpicks, and 35 years: An incredible kinetic sculpture of San Francisco. Thirty five years ago I had yet to be born, but artist Scott Weaver had already begun work on this insanely complex kinetic sculpture, Rolling through the Bay, that he continues to modify and expand even today.

One man, 100,000 toothpicks, and 35 years: An incredible kinetic sculpture of San Francisco

The elaborate sculpture is comprised of multiple “tours” that move pingpong balls through neighborhoods, historical locations, and iconic symbols of San Francisco, all recreated with a little glue, some toothpicks, and an incredible amount of ingenuity. He admits in the video that there are several toothpick sculptures even larger than his, but none has the unique kinetic components he’s constructed. Via his website Weaver estimates he’s spent over 3,000 hours on the project, and the toothpicks have been sourced from around the world: I have used different brands of toothpicks depending on what I am building.

I also have many friends and family members that collect toothpicks in their travels for me. The Book Surgeon (15 pieces) Using knives, tweezers and surgical tools, Brian Dettmer carves one page at a time.

The Book Surgeon (15 pieces)

Nothing inside the out-of-date encyclopedias, medical journals, illustration books, or dictionaries is relocated or implanted, only removed. Dettmer manipulates the pages and spines to form the shape of his sculptures. He also folds, bends, rolls, and stacks multiple books to create completely original sculptural forms. Monolithic Sculptures Created from Junk. Steven Siegel’s monumental sculptures using discarded trash and waste as his chosen medium make a statement that goes beyond simply preaching about sustainability. “Freight and Barrel,” 2004, Three Rivers Arts Festival, Pittsburgh, crushed plastics.

All images courtesy of Steven Siegel . Before you start licking your lips at the thought of tucking into a giant burrito, you might want to consider what the delicacy before you contains. If this is junk food, then it’s never been super-sized like this before — and it’s never contained more junk. But let’s get serious for a second. “Two of ‘em,” 2009, Penn State Berks, Reading, PA — bamboo, aluminum cans In truth, this is junk art on a massive scale, each sculpture created out of the discarded detritus of modern life yet somehow existing in a certain harmony with its surroundings. “Bale,” 2001, University of Virginia, Charlottesville — crushed plastic “It Goes Under,” 2008, University of Wyoming Museum of Art, Laramie — wood mulch, window screen.