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How Mindfulness Helps You See What's Missing (And Why You'd Want To) In Basic Mindfulness (the system of Mindfulness I teach) there’s a term called “Gone.” Gone refers to any moment of partial or complete disappearance that you happen to notice. It’s as simple as that. If you notice a bird stop chirping, if you notice an itch become less itchy, if you notice a car pass by and disappear from view, you could call these events “Gone.”

The technique sensitizes you to a fundamental truth: everything is always disappearing. Impermanence is something you can understand intellectually, as in “this too shall pass.” But your world really begins to change when you know impermanence experientially, discovering moment by moment that no sooner does the activity in any of your senses arise, than it is already disappearing. This inevitably leads to the insight that there is no “self” as a thing, no thing-ness at all.

What I find tragically fascinating about this technique is how frequently students think they’re doing it wrong or don’t believe they can do it at all. 11 Goal Hacks: How to Achieve Anything. Goal-setting research on fantasising, visualisation, goal commitment, procrastination, the dark side of goal-setting and more… We’re all familiar with the nuts and bolts of goal-setting.

We should set specific, challenging goals, use rewards, record progress and make public commitments (if you’re not familiar with these then check out this article on how to reach life goals). So how come we still fail? This psychological research suggests why and what mindsets should help us reach our goals. 1. Stop fantasising The biggest enemy of any goal is excessive positive fantasising. 2. The reason we don’t achieve our goals is lack of commitment. One powerful psychological technique to increase commitment is mental contrasting. 3. You can use the Zeigarnik effect to drag you on towards your goal. What the Zeigarnik effect teaches is that one weapon for beating procrastination is starting somewhere…anywhere. 4. 5.

When we miss our target, we can fall foul of the what-the-hell-effect. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. The Brain Hacks Top Founders Use To Get The Job Done. Katia Verresen's new client had a big problem: He needed to find three to four extra hours in his day.

This, of course, seemed like an impossible feat for an oversubscribed startup founder, but his ability to fundraise and recruit the best talent depended on it. By the time he met Verresen, executive coach to many such founders, he was drained, pessimistic, dreading every week before it started. Even though tech culture champions sleeplessness, overtime and burnout, Verresen has seen how this mindset can lead to failure.

To turn it around, her first order of business is to collect as much data on her clients as she can and funnel it into a plan with one goal: Maximizing energy. Physical energy, emotional energy, and mental energy. These are the components of successful execution that are too often overlooked. But the proof is in the pudding. Her method has turned Verresen into one of the most sought after coaches in the business. Filling Your Buckets Entrepreneurism as Endurance Sport. How To Simplify A Complicated Life. 52 Totally Feasible Ways To Organize Your Entire Home. Organizing Homelife | IHeart Organizing.

The Organised Housewife : Ideas for organising, decluttering and cleaning your home. GTD Not Working for You? Try Action Method Online. Hello there! If you are new here, please consider subscribing to the RSS feed or following us on Twitter to receive site updates. Some of you may have already read our rather detailed how-to on Getting Things Done in Evernote with Only One Notebook — in fact, we are pleasantly surprised on a daily basis by how many people keep reading it… But what if you don’t use Evernote? *gasp* Or what if GTD just doesn’t quite do it for you? Maybe you need something a bit more visual? Action Method Online is a web app (for both browsers and Adobe AIR) by Behance that brings a whole new methodology to the productivity, task management and project management worlds.

How is it different from GTD? At first glance, GTD fans may find some similarities with David Allen’s Getting Things Done methodology — but it is actually quite different in its approach. “(1) While GTD is based on WHERE you are when you do stuff (eg: @work, @home), the Action Method is project centric (not context centric). Main Features. How Evernote Works Like Your Memory: An Interview with Maureen Ritchey, Cognitive Neuroscientist.

Evernote is designed to work the way your brain does and a few months ago, a neuroscientist named Maureen Ritchey came by our offices to explain exactly why that’s the case. We didn’t want to keep the fascinating information to ourselves, so we asked Maureen to stop by our blog and share some of her knowledge with our users. Thanks, Maureen! What is your background and area of research? I’m a cognitive neuroscientist, which means that I study how the brain supports mental function. I completed my PhD at Duke University, where my graduate work focused on the influence of emotion on the neural bases of memory. How do our brains retrieve memories? Why are some memories easier to recall than others? How do our brains make connections between memories and help us associate them with specific people, places, and periods of time?

How can you proactively strengthen your memory? How important is context to memory? What factors influence the ease with which we remember something? This 15-Minute Activity Will Make You More Successful At Work. A Periodic Table of Visualization Methods. The Theory of Awesomeness.

How To Rest Your Mind. ~ Rose Taylor Goldfield. Indian teachers of yoga say that the Corpse Pose is the hardest yoga pose for Westerners. In Corpse Pose, we lie on the floor and surrender to the earth, leaving the body in perfect rest and stillness as though dead. But many of us have problems even with the pose of complete rest. We either fidget and shift our bodies or our mind gives up and goes to sleep.

Being able to actually rest is an art for us to cultivate. One of the keys to meditation practice is to give ourselves permission to let go into resting. We begin to rest when we abandon our achievement oriented mind that relentlessly keeps us moving towards a goal. In order to help me enter the resting quality of meditation, I enjoy using this verse by the yogi Milarepa, a Tibetan master who lived 1040-1123 and is revered for having overcome suffering and persevering through great hardship to attain realization.

I’ve added some lines of commentary to further illuminate his words. Let your mind rest uncontrived. Don't Break the Chain. 30 Questions to Ask Yourself Before You Die. {Via studioflowerpower on etsy} “Rather than money, than fame, than love…give me truth.” ~ Thoreau I woke up this morning and my life clock marked 30. My first sleep-deprived idea was to pack a small suitcase, get on the first train, move to another country, change my name, change my hair color (or get plastic surgery if needed), and start from scratch. When I don’t know how to deal with life, I hide sometimes. And others, I fight it.

By now, I’m good at both: fighting and disappearing. A true warrior doesn’t feel forced to do either, but moves through and with and for life, like water. So after I washed my face and considered the costs of running and those of fighting, I decided to do neither and have some juice instead. {Alkaline Espresso / Click for recipe.} We are a constant process, an event, we’re change. As such, our smaller houses, our temporary homes can only be made of cards. Loving the questions means to love yourself. How much have you loved? You. Comments. Start Every Day as a Producer, Not a Consumer. I have to agree that my most productive days are those where I don't allow myself to read the news, check e-mail, facebook, etc., right after I get up. However, that happens because I've got a ton of stuff to get done, and the outside world takes a back seat until my workload is under control.

However, there are certain biological necessities that have to happen before I can be productive. The dog gets let out, I go to the bathroom, I eat/drink something, and *then* I sit down to be productive. I also *have* to check my e-mail, because if something blew up overnight or there's something that needs to be dealt with ASAP, I need to know as early as possible. Flagged. How To Waste Time Properly - Issue 7: Waste. Ever since Frederick Winslow Taylor timed the exact number of seconds that Bethlehem Steel workers took to push shovels into a load of iron ore and then draw them out, maximizing time efficiency has been a holy grail of the American workplace.

But psychologists and neuroscientists are showing us the limits of this attitude: Wasting time, they say, can make you more creative. Even seemingly meaningless activities such as watching cat videos on YouTube may help you solve math problems. Brent Coker, who studies online behavior at the University of Melbourne in Australia, found that people who engage in “workplace Internet leisure browsing” are about 9 percent more productive than those who don’t. Last year, Jonathan Schooler, a psychology professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara published with his doctoral student Benjamin Baird a study called Inspired by Distraction. Schooler isn’t alone in his conclusion. So what kinds of distractions, exactly, are best? Monotasking Is The New Multitasking. We all know multitasking is inefficient. A classic 2007 study of Microsoft workers found that when they responded to email or instant messaging alerts, it took them, on average, nearly 10 minutes to deal with their inboxes or messages, and another 10-15 minutes to really get back into their original tasks.

That means that a mere three distractions per hour can preclude you from getting anything else done. Then there’s the relationship “inefficiency” that comes from multitasking. You can spend hours rebuilding the good will torched by a single glance at your phone during an inopportune time. We know this, yet we keep doing it. I checked my inbox after writing the opening paragraphs of this piece (nothing but press releases, alas). No human activity is immune. Fortunately, there are ways to learn to focus. Live right There are many reasons to exercise, hydrate, and get enough sleep--and the ability to fight distractions is one of them.

Tie yourself to the mast Play offense Plan. Multi-Tasking and it’s Effect on Concentration, Intelligence, and Reasoning | TopMemoryTechniques.com. Recently there was an experiment conducted that studied two sets of people. One consisted of individuals who multi-tasked constantly, while the other group rarely engaged in multi-tasking. Both groups were comprised strictly of students attending Stanford University, so it can be assumed that all are of above average intelligence. In order to compare their methods of concentration and managing information, both groups took part in a number of cognitive exercises. When some type of interference surfaced during the test, the individuals who multi-tasked frequently had difficulty maintaining concentration. Performing a number of tasks simultaneously is also believed to be detrimental to comprehension and aptitude. Armed with this new information, do you still maintain that it is beneficial to be able to multi-task?

The Myth of Multitasking. Christine Rosen In one of the many letters he wrote to his son in the 1740s, Lord Chesterfield offered the following advice: “There is time enough for everything in the course of the day, if you do but one thing at once, but there is not time enough in the year, if you will do two things at a time.” To Chesterfield, singular focus was not merely a practical way to structure one’s time; it was a mark of intelligence. “This steady and undissipated attention to one object, is a sure mark of a superior genius; as hurry, bustle, and agitation, are the never-failing symptoms of a weak and frivolous mind.” In modern times, hurry, bustle, and agitation have become a regular way of life for many people — so much so that we have embraced a word to describe our efforts to respond to the many pressing demands on our time: multitasking.

In the late 1990s and early 2000s, one sensed a kind of exuberance about the possibilities of multitasking. Dr. Changing Our Brains Other experts aren’t so sure. How to Finish Your Work, One Bite at a Time. “How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time.” If you’ve ever ran more than a few miles, you probably understand why you need to pace yourself. Runners that sprint at the start of a race will be exhausted far before they cross the finish line. The same principle applies when trying to get work done. Weekly/Daily To-Do Lists The principle behind the WD To-Do List method is simple: At the end of the week, write a list containing everything you want to get accomplished.At the end of the day, write a list containing what parts of that weekly list you want to be finished tomorrow.

After you finish your daily list, you stop. Although this technique might sound obvious (and it is), there are some key advantages using a WD system has over the typical, Getting Things Done approach of keeping Next Action or project lists. Why the Weekly/Daily To-Do List System Rocks: After using this method for several months, I’ve found it beats the other systems in a few key places: Focus on the Daily List.

Internet techy stuff

How-to-be-productive_530adf38cc928_w1500. Learning Visually | Living the Dream. Infographics work in the classroom because they grab students and allow an entry point to learning — and because they sum up pages and pages, even chapters, of information that would take a reader hours to process. Interactive infographics make kids want to immediately start clicking around to see what’s what. For a teacher who prioritizes an inquiry-driven classroom, that’s a great starting point. Infographics and Data visualization are not just for consumption though, teachers and students can also challenge the learning process by creating original graphics for themselves.

Go here –> Consuming the information is one portion of the equation when discussing data visualization. Sometimes you look at a piece and think, what the heck is that supposed to be telling me! There are elements of design to evaluate as well as functionality/clarity of purpose. . … classroom examples of consumption graphics. Procrastination hack: '(10+2)*5'. Following on the idea of the procrastination dash and Jeff’s progressive dash, I’ve been experimenting with a squirelly new system to pound through my procrastinated to-do list. Brace yourself, because it is a bit more byzantine than is Merlin 2005’s newly stripped-down habit. It’s called (10+2)*5, and today it will save your ass. Who it’s for procrastinatorsthe easily distractedcompulsive web-surferspeople with a long list of very short tasks (a/k/a “mosquitos”) people having trouble chipping away at very large tasks What you’ll need a timermust be easy to resetelectronic kitchen timer is particularly good (pref. with multiple alarm memories), oran app like Minuteur (get the newest version—several cool new features)a reduced subset of your to-do list tasks that can be worked on (not necessarily completed) in blocks of 10 minutes or lessGTD people: next actions only, pleasean hour of your time (less is potentially okay, but it’s non-canonical)your sorry, procrastinating ass How it works.