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To Do List. Michigan Officials Take Control Of Detroit's Empty Wallet. With a declining population and dwindling tax base, Detroit has grappled with severe financial problems in the past decade.

Michigan Officials Take Control Of Detroit's Empty Wallet

J.D. Pooley/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption J.D. Pooley/Getty Images With a declining population and dwindling tax base, Detroit has grappled with severe financial problems in the past decade. J.D. In a small public-TV studio before an invitation-only audience of 30 people, Michigan Gov. The state's signature city is grappling with a declining population, a dwindling tax base and decades of mismanagement — including corruption so pervasive at times that former Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick is currently on trial for federal racketeering charges. Detroit’s City Retirees Worry Pensions Won’t Be Paid. Representatives of Detroit’s active and retired public workers wait for a meeting in Detroit, Wednesday, July 10, 2013.

Detroit’s City Retirees Worry Pensions Won’t Be Paid

(Paul Sancya/AP) Michigan Governor Rick Snyder says he’s not sure whether all of the people owed money by the city of Detroit will ever be paid, now that the city has declared bankruptcy. He says the city will continue to pay its bills and its current employees — but no one is sure what will happen to the 21,000 retirees who depend on city pensions and medical care to live. The money provided to the pension fund is the second largest expense for Detroit, after fire and police services. Retirees say lawmakers made bad decisions that led to the the pension fund being in the red by $3.5 billion — but officials say they failed to negotiate with the unions to lower the pension payments.

Guest Cynthia Falska, worked for the Detroit Police Department for 33 years. "Lack of accountability, poor management" source of Detroit Fire Dept. problems. Six officers sworn into Sterling Heights Police Department - News - Source Newspapers. By SEAN DELANEYsean.delaney@advisorsource.com@sdelaney81 The Sterling Heights Police Department continued to grow March 1 as Interim Chief John Berg welcomed Officers Garrett Burton, Luke Drejewski, Luke Dusellier, Jeffrey Elgert, Ryan Goddard and Matthew Virgadamo to the department during a swearing-in ceremony in front of the City Council.

Six officers sworn into Sterling Heights Police Department - News - Source Newspapers

The Sterling Heights Police Department continued to grow March 1 as Interim Chief John Berg welcomed six new officers to the department during a swearing-in ceremony in front of City Council. “I’m very proud to introduce these six new members of the Sterling Heights Police Department,” Berg said. “They are our future.” At the meeting, Berg introduced Officers Garrett Burton, Luke Drejewski, Luke Dusellier, Jeffrey Elgert, Ryan Goddard and Matthew Virgadamo to the council. Detroit fire commissioner forced out just weeks before Devil's Night following Muckraker reports.

Photo by Steve Neavling.

Detroit fire commissioner forced out just weeks before Devil's Night following Muckraker reports

Less than three weeks before Devil’s Night, the notorious pre-Halloween tradition of setting houses and buildings ablaze in Detroit, Fire Commissioner Edsel Jenkins is on his way out. Fire Commissioner Edsel Jenkins The 30-year veteran of the department met briefly with Mayor Mike Duggan’s administration this afternoon and returned to fire headquarters to notify his staff that he is retiring under pressure, several sources within the Fire Department confirmed today. “I started in this department as a firefighter at the age of 19 and am grateful that I had the privilege of serving as its Executive Commissioner,” Jenkins said in a statement.

“I look forward to spending more time with my family.” Jenkins often downplayed the problems and criticized our coverage, saying the fleet of defective fire trucks was “up to snuff,” even as rigs continued to break down nearly every day, causing fires to burn longer and cause more damage. Steve Neavling. Detroit Fire Department. With The Command - Detroit Fire Department- controversy continues. Fire Department punishes critics Whistleblowers defend themselves against charges of violating Detroit station policies By Melvin Claxton and Charles Hurt / The Detroit News DETROIT -- While promising major reforms, Detroit fire officials continue to stifle criticism of the Fire Department by concealing important documents, barring firefighters from speaking to the news media and punishing whistleblowers.

With The Command - Detroit Fire Department- controversy continues

Last month, fire officials changed the locks at one firehouse and threatened to punish any firefighter who let the news media into the building, which was closed for a second time in just over a year for repairs. The city spent more than $2.1 million in 1999 to renovate the station house, located at Cass and Alexandrine. Fire Commissioner Charles Wilson and other top department officials have gone beyond mere threats. Fire officials also have denied the existence of damaging records. I did nothing wrong," Fuller said. Shot by the Police in Albuquerque. Stephen Torres was meeting with a client at his law office, in downtown Albuquerque, on April 12, 2011, when he received a call from a neighbor, who told him that police officers were aiming rifles at his house.

Shot by the Police in Albuquerque

He left work and drove to his home, in a middle-class suburb with a view of the mountains. There were more than forty police vehicles on his street. Officers wearing camouflage fatigues and bulletproof vests had circled his home, a sand-colored two-story house with a pitched tile roof. Two officers were driving a remote-controlled robot, used for discharging bombs, back and forth on the corner. Stephen’s wife, Renetta, the director of human resources for the county, arrived a few minutes later, just after three o’clock. Renetta and Stephen found each other at the southern end of the street. Retired police, firefighters reach deal with Detroit. DETROIT — The City of Detroit reached a deal Tuesday with a retired police and firefighters group to preserve current pensions, according to mediators.

Retired police, firefighters reach deal with Detroit

The deal, which Detroit bankruptcy mediator Gerald Rosen revealed, comes as the city also is close to reaching an agreement with its Official Committee of Retirees and two independently run pension fund boards. The Retired Detroit Police and Fire Fighters Association agreed to support a deal that would involve not cutting monthly pension checks and keeping almost half of annual cost-of-living increases, Rosen said in a statement. The current cost-of-living adjustment is 2.25%. The latest deal, which comes after separate accords with two global banks and unsecured bondholders, could hasten the city's emergence from bankruptcy and speed the city's plans to reinvest in services.

STORY: Detroit bankruptcy plan puts art above people, unions saySTORY: Detroit bond deal frees up $100 million for pensioners Read or Share this story: