A Station-by-Station Guide to Becoming a Kitchen Pro A Station-by-Station Guide to Becoming a Kitchen Pro If used correctly, wood cutting boards are actually just as safe if not safer for meat than plastic. Some woods are naturally anti-microbial so if your knife is properly sharpened, any bacteria you can't rinse off will die on the wood anyways (it can't reproduce if you treat your board right). This only works if you know to properly oil the wood enough and again, you aren't damaging the board when you chop (again, learn to use and sharpen your knives). I use a wood board for all kinds of meat and I have never gotten sick from my own cooking, ever. [www.reluctantgourmet.com]

The Stupid Things You Do in the Kitchen (and How to Fix Them)

Love cooking or hate it, much of your time in the kitchen is likely wasted by easily correctable mistakes you probably don't even know you're making. You waste time prepping ingredients, use your knives incorrectly, mix and match the wrong utensils, and throw out food that's still good—and those are just a few of the stupid things you do in the kitchen. Here's how to fix them. P The Stupid Things You Do in the Kitchen (and How to Fix Them)
Top 10 Crazy Kitchen Tricks That Speed Up Your Cooking

Top 10 Crazy Kitchen Tricks That Speed Up Your Cooking

So you've started beefing up your cooking skills, but the process is still a little tedious. Here are 10 surprising kitchen techniques that will save you a bunch of time—not to mention wow your friends. 10. Deseed a Pomegranate in Seconds Using a Wooden Spoon If you don't love pomegranates, it's either because you've never had one or you hate how much work they take to deseed.
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"it's just a chemical dosage that goes from your mouth to your brain" - sorry, but that is completely misleading, and in an article purporting to explain how food interacts with the brain, is downright false. It also ignores information given by the sources you actually quote. Neurotransmitters, with a few exceptions, are composed of protein-like molecules which are digested and absorbed by the gut like any other protein. Glutamate, for example, is the most widely used neurotransmitter in the brain, and is the same glutamate which we find in monosodium glutamate. If food was "a chemical dosage that goes from your mouth to your brain", eating a sprinkling of MSG would give you a full blown epileptic seizure, which it clearly does not. A large component of Vegemite, for example, is glutamate, which makes it tasty, but doesn't provoke large scale seizures by entering the brain. What 'Brain Food' Actually Does for Your Brain What 'Brain Food' Actually Does for Your Brain
Budget Kitchen Upgrades for Every Kitchen that Will Change the Way You Cook (and Eat!) Cooking is much more fun when you have all the right gear to make your food dreams into food reality. If you have a contentious relationship with your kitchen, the problem may have to do with things like dull knives or the wrong tools, requiring you to undertake boring, repetitive tasks to make the simplest things. We teamed up with a group of chefs to come up with a list of gear for your kitchen that will transform the way you cook—and eat—without breaking the bank. I love to cook, and I think part of the fun for me is having the toys in my kitchen to play with when a recipe strikes my fancy or I get a crazy idea. Budget Kitchen Upgrades for Every Kitchen that Will Change the Way You Cook (and Eat!)
EatingWell: 10 Bad Cooking Habits You Should Break EatingWell: 10 Bad Cooking Habits You Should Break By Hilary Meyer, Associate Food Editor, EatingWell Magazine Some habits can be tough to break. When it comes to cooking, you may have some bad habits that you’re not even aware of.

10+ Dishes and Drinks Everyone Should Know How to Make At Home (Including You)

10+ Dishes and Drinks Everyone Should Know How to Make At Home (Including You) Whether you have trouble boiling water or you know your way around an immersion circulator, there are some foods that everyone should know how to make, either because they're delicious, they're easy, or they require skills that will benefit you as you learn your way around the kitchen. We asked some professional chefs (and the Lifehacker team) what you should be able to make, no matter who you are, and how. Photo by Buck. Chef Anthony Thomas - Roasted Garlic and Spaghetti Sauce
Eating your lunch by yourself can get a little boring. There's no conversation to distract you from the fact that each bite of your sandwich or each sip of your soup tastes pretty much the same, bite after bite, slurp after slurp. Unless, of course, you do what I do when I eat solo: create lots and lots of variety. Tips for a Better Solo Lunch Cooking for One Tips for a Better Solo Lunch Cooking for One
How to Order Wine at a Restaurant Without Looking Clueless Wine is often perceived as a stuffy, fussy thing, but it doesn't have to be. Sure, different flavors may go better with different foods, but in the end everyone's palate is different, and there's no reason you need to be a sommelier-in-training to order a decent wine with your meal. It's easier than you think, and we sat down with a wine expert and educator to come up with some tricks you can take with you to the restaurant. Ordering a bottle of wine at a restaurant can be a tricky affair, especially if you're on a date or you're ordering with a group of people and they all turn to you for advice. How to Order Wine at a Restaurant Without Looking Clueless
I used to walk the freezer aisle in envy of all of those perfectly engineered frozen burritos. How did they managed to get everything in there in so it doesn't overcook when reheated? And sealed in with just a thin plastic wrapper? How To Make Your Own Frozen Wraps Freezer Friendly How To Make Your Own Frozen Wraps Freezer Friendly