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Top 10 Crazy Kitchen Tricks That Speed Up Your Cooking

Top 10 Crazy Kitchen Tricks That Speed Up Your Cooking
I would like to add that the wider the ring, the easier it seems to be. I had a titanium ring more than twice the width of the one shown in the video and it was easy as hell. My wedding ring (which is about the same size as the one in your linked video) still works, but takes more effort and can hurt if I don't leverage it JUST right. I would also like to echo the sentiments of not using your wedding ring (At least in view of your significant other). The one time I got caught doing it, my wife was PISSED. Yea, definitely the wider the ring the better. I usually just use another bottle of unopened beer. Related:  Tips, Tricks, Hacks etc.

Use These Customer Service Shortcuts to Stop Wasting Time Waiting for Help The main problem with customer service queues is the average person is a moron and that makes the other half even dumber than that. So people with legitimate concerns or requests have to wait in line behind morons. If you need any proof, go to the Post Office, DMV, or even your local McDonald's. Speaking of McDonald's, always amazes me how you can get behind grown people that act like it's the very first visit of their life and take five minutes to order a meal. The longer I live the more and more convinced I become that people are just dumb animals that learned how to use their thumbs to pick shit up.

Plan Your Weekly Meals, Stress Free I've been planning my recipes and doing my shopping for the week ahead for years now. Awesome idea. One thing I've learned - you just cant set meals for specific days. Even choosing tomorrows meal is a bit wonky. I used to try at first, but there are just way too many things that crop up to stop you - meeting a mate for a drink after work, small (or missed) lunch so you're starving when you get home and your meal takes an hour to make, 'accidentally' snacking mid-afternoon so not hungry when you get home, delayed journeys, too tired when you get in to start faffing around with big recipes. Its a nice idea but for me, no. What works for me is just to have a list of meals, and to make sure that you have some that are quicker and/or easier than others. Even better, make sure that at least one of them is a store cupboard dinner - i.e. most of the things come out of tins or packets. By the way, let me recommend this book as the daddy of all midweek cooking books for lifehackers.

A Chicken in Every (Crock) Pot The phrase "a chicken in every pot" has been repeated throughout history, beginning with King Henry IV in France. The words promise good times, with enough to eat and time to relax and enjoy it. These days, most people cook their chicken in a crockpot. The crockpot is probably the best time saver in the kitchen today. There are some tips for cooking chicken in your slow cooker. Bone-in and boneless chicken have different cooking requirements. Vegetables in these recipe should go into the bottom of the crockpot, with the meat on top because vegetables cook more slowly than meat. For hints and tips about using your crockpot to its fullest capacity, see Crockpot Lessons. A Chicken in Every (Crock) Pot

How to Create a Personal Encryption Scheme to Easily Hide Your Data in Plain Sight I think the article is saying you could use LastPass to generate your LastPass password and the article's encryption scheme to keep the password in plain sight. Then you would not have to remember it. For example if your LastPass encryption key password was something like /%/K\G,_sO¦R¥ÅÀbݾöà~¼ÐÂ4×òO? Then you could write it down as a series of letters like SlPerSlKBkslG...etc. You can still use LastPass to generate your passwords and use this article to write them down. then you're up the creek without a paddle. SlPerSlKBkslG...etc. Sorry for the double post above. Because the NSA has declared war on each and every human being on earth and they do know how to decrypt common algorithms.

The Stupid Things You Do in the Kitchen (and How to Fix Them) Love cooking or hate it, much of your time in the kitchen is likely wasted by easily correctable mistakes you probably don't even know you're making. You waste time prepping ingredients, use your knives incorrectly, mix and match the wrong utensils, and throw out food that's still good—and those are just a few of the stupid things you do in the kitchen. Here's how to fix them. P Stupid Thing #1: You Spend Too Much Time Prepping IngredientsP Few people enjoy the tedium of prepping ingredients. Say you're cutting a bunch of carrots into sticks; it doesn't make sense to trim, peel, and slice each one individually. It also helps to use two bowls—one for scraps and one for cleaning—so you don't make a mess during the preparation process. These are all great ways to save you time and keep you organized, but a few common ingredients have tricks all their own. Stupid Thing #2: You Use Your Knives WrongP The easiest issue to correct is a dull blade, and it's one of the most important.

These Three Kitchen Shortcuts Will Change the Way You Cook Healthy eating starts at home, but most people don’t have the ability or energy to spend hours in the kitchen every day. Between work, school, family, and other responsibilities, time is of the essence. These are my favorite tips for home cooks, as they help to minimize both mess and time in the kitchen. My cooking students always tell me how, since learning to do weekend planning and prep, their weeknight dinners are so much easier. 1. My most important kitchen shortcut is batch cooking on the weekend, which sets you up for success during the week. For example, make a huge pot of beans on Sunday. Beans and riceSoup with beansSalad with beansBean spread/dip You can do the same thing by whipping up a triple batch of grains, such as brown rice or quinoa, over the weekend. While you’re batch cooking your single ingredient, cut up whatever raw veggies you have in your fridge. (RELATED: A Top Chef’s Healthy Cooking Tips That Every Home Cook Needs to Know) 2. 3.

How To Make Natural Garden Pesticides Garden pests are one of the few things that can make the otherwise enjoyable task of gardening frustrating. Whether it's snails taking over your lettuce or aphids sucking on your roses, a pest infestation is definitely disappointing, but it's not a reason to reach for harmful, toxic sprays. The sprays might eliminate the pesky culprits, but they are harmful to you and the environment. Instead, try whipping up one of these simple recipes with ingredients you most likely have on hand. What You Need Materials Spray bottles Biodegradable liquid dish soap Lemon or orange essential oil Cooking oil Baking soda Garlic Chili powder water Natural Insecticidal Soap Spray This soap is easy to make and good keep on hand, since it should take care of most of those annoying common pests such as aphids, mites, white flies, thrips, and mealy bugs. In a spray bottle, combine: 1 1/2 tablespoons of liquid soap 1 quart of water A couple drops of orange or lemon essential oil All-Purpose Garlic Chili Spray

Five Best Recipe Organization Tools Trust me, I was just as surprised when tallying the votes for the top five. I thought more recipe organization apps would be in the running, but - as mentioned several times above - they just weren't nominated. Managed to get a few into the honorable mentions though. My fault also, I keep running across the finalists for these things instead of the original nomination article. SExpand Actually Nate, you might want to check out Springpad, since it has a specific "Recipe Box" type setup. I've been using Springpad for ages, but I didn't even know about the recipe option until this voting thing started... then I looked into it, and it's about as full-featured as any other recipe app I've tried! Here's an example of a recipe.

5 Ways To Make Frozen Vegetables Suck a Little Less Although spring is upon us and we should be taking full advantage of farmers' markets and fresh grocery store offerings, sometimes the frozen veggies still come in handy for last-minute dinner convenience. back is what's for dinner. In an effort to make them taste, less, well, frozen, here are five ways to help get the most flavor from our freezer friends! The first thing to remember is that frozen vegetables actually can be quite good (and good for you). Take a look at my tips and share your own! 1. 2. Salt + Pepper + Butter = Nothing in that list is rocket science by any means, it's as basic as basic gets, but sometimes getting the most flavor from something means keeping it simple. 3. 4. 5. Do you have any tricks up your sleeve for making frozen veg suck a little less? This post was requested by sprite for Reader Request Week 2013! (Image: Faith Durand)

How To Remove a Stripped Screw Without an Extractor Home Hacks Previous image Next image Placing a wide rubber band inbetween the stripped screw and the screw driver can sometimes help give enough grip to remove a slightly stripped screw head. Almost everyone who has worked on a DIY or renovation project has applied too much torque and stripped a screw head clean. It can feel like a frustrating dead end, especially if you don't have a specialized extractor kit on hand. But you might be able to remove a stripped screw using a very common household item probably already sitting in your desk or kitchen drawer... What You Need Hammer Clamp locking pliers or needle nose plier Wide rubber band Multi-head screwdriver kit Instructions 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Originally posted February 1, 2010 (Images: Gregory Han) More posts in this series Home Hacks 2010 You are on the last post of the series.

The Best, Non-Crazy Ways to Use Grocery Coupons I use the circulars from our favorite grocery store each week to plan our weekly menu. Our circulars are included in our Sunday paper and we have a subscription for just that day. Then, I use coupons included in the paper or those I've stumbled across and sometimes I'll go online to coupon.com or similar to scan for items of interest. I really only bother with coupons for things that we regularly purchase anyway or that fit in with the weekly sales and our menu. I also save up coupons for items we regularly stock and will wait for those items to go on sale. After I started doing this, after about 2 months, I had a really well-stocked pantry where pretty much everything I bought on sale (and much of it with coupons, too). It may sound a little nuts, but after a few weeks of getting used to it, it now takes me maybe one hour on Sunday to plan the weekly menu around the sales, clip new coupons, and scan through my existing coupons to match up to the sales or find those that will expire soon.

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