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Cognitive bias cheat sheet – Better Humans. On Flipboard. 5 Common Mental Errors That Sway You From Making Good Decisions – Medium. Harvard researchers have mapped the five child-rearing techniques you need to raise kind kids. What makes highly creative people different from the rest of us?

Harvard researchers have mapped the five child-rearing techniques you need to raise kind kids

In the 1960s, psychologist and creativity researcher Frank X. Barron set about finding out. Barron conducted a series of experiments on some of his generation’s most renowned thinkers in an attempt to isolate the unique spark of creative genius. In a historic study, Barron invited a group of high-profile creators—including writers Truman Capote, William Carlos Williams, and Frank O’Connor, along with leading architects, scientists, entrepreneurs, and mathematicians—to spend several days living in a former frat house on the University of California at Berkeley campus. Carnegie Mellon made a special pair of glasses that lets you steal a digital identity — Quartz. In the final tense days before Americans go to the polls to pick the nation’s next president, it’s natural to assume that a loss for Donald Trump would deliver a nasty blow to the party that picked him as its nominee.

Carnegie Mellon made a special pair of glasses that lets you steal a digital identity — Quartz

The Republican Party is already in crisis, with infighting over Trump and the party’s future; losing the presidency again, it stands to reason, would continue their downward spiral and could even lead to the party’s destruction. But nothing could be further from the truth. Win or lose the presidency, there’s almost no chance of the party actually dissolving, as the video above shows. How To Hack Your Brain For Creative Ideas Before You Even Get Out Of Bed. Eat.

How To Hack Your Brain For Creative Ideas Before You Even Get Out Of Bed

Sleep. Solve problems. Repeat. You probably spend a large part of your waking hours tackling challenges, especially when you’re at work. That’s not necessarily a bad thing. This six-minute short film plunges you into an augmented reality hellscape. "What if advertising, but too much?

This six-minute short film plunges you into an augmented reality hellscape

" That's often the formula for short films about augmented reality. (Thanks to The Verge's VR expert Adi Robertson for that one-liner.) But this new entry into the genre from artist Keiichi Matsuda still feels compelling, not least because the visuals are so beautifully hectic. Every physical surface in "HYPER-REALITY" has been plastered with holographic images, often to the point of obscuring the underlying world altogether. I think the film feels so disturbingly familiar, though, not because the protagonist's POV is surrounded by adverts, but more personal messages as well — notifications, to-do lists, even a virtual "inspiration guru" from a temping agency.

Netflix Knows Which Pictures You'll Click On. It's still one of the great mysteries of the Internet: with the millions of images that bombard us on the web every day, what makes us click on one instead of another?

Netflix Knows Which Pictures You'll Click On

Are some pictures universally appealing, or is art always a matter of personal opinion? Netflix has been pondering these profound questions for years. After all, images are critical to getting you to binge: A small, compelling thumbnail could mean the difference between getting you to spend the entire weekend watching House of Cards or losing interest and bouncing over to Hulu. A powerful picture is an incredibly efficient tool: The human brain can process an image in just a few milliseconds, so the right picture can spark someone's interest and convince a viewer it's worth exploring a new show in a single glance.

Which is why, in 2014, Netflix began gathering consumer research specifically about the images on its service. How VR and real-time data are changing shopping. Real-time technology is revamping the world of bricks-and-mortar retail.

How VR and real-time data are changing shopping

From sensory marketing tools to cameras that track in-store shopper traffic, brands now have a wide array of options to help adapt store environments to consumers’ behaviour in order to maximise sales. A new report by shopping centre operator Westfield claims that customers increasingly expect retailers to use technology to intervene in the shopping experience. It finds that 41% of UK shoppers are interested in using virtual reality (VR) headsets to experience products or services, while around a third would like stores to offer experiences that appeal to senses such as sound, smell and taste, in addition to sight and touch.

The report claims that it is becoming increasingly important to manipulate these aspects of physical stores to differentiate them from shopping online. Scientists have uncovered exactly what makes a photo memorable. Invisible portraits by Blommers & Schumm. Invisible portraits by Blommers & Schumm. Your Future Music Playlist Could Know How You Feel. Researchers at the University of Cambridge have linked musical taste to thinking style, with possible implications for how future algorithms might better tailor music recommendations.

Your Future Music Playlist Could Know How You Feel

Not to mention the flip side: how music streaming services could psychologically classify their users, based on what they like to listen to. The study, Musical Preferences are Linked to Cognitive Styles, published in the journal Plos One, suggests it might be possible to create music recommendation algorithms based on empathizing-systemizing theory, which is the suggestion that people can be classified according to how they score on those two cognitive dimensions. The researchers found that musical tastes could be predicted by analyzing individual cognitive style, linking certain genres and styles of music based on individuals’ scoring highly for empathy or for analytical (systemizing) thinking. They write: Individuals who scored more highly for empathy (type E) tended to prefer mellow music (e.g. They note: Quanta Research Institute: VideoScope.