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Attaching an external aerial to a radio (FM/DAB) without an external aerial socket ? - Page 2 - Technical. How to Make an FM Antenna: 8 steps (with pictures) Edit Article Community Q&A Improving the reception of commercial FM radio (88Mhz - 108Mhz) can be done by you at home, simply by replacing the antenna with a 5/8 wave folded dipole antenna.

How to Make an FM Antenna: 8 steps (with pictures)

Many radios and most home stereo receivers include antenna terminals for the connection of an external antenna. Usually the supplied antenna is a minimalist design (sometimes only an "internal" type, or as a telescopic rod or a short length of wire). This can be greatly improved for very little money outlay. Steps <img alt="Image titled Make an FM Antenna Step 1" src=" width="728" height="546" class="whcdn" onload="WH.performance.clearMarks('image1_rendered'); WH.performance.mark('image1_rendered');">1Determine the frequency of the station desired to be tuned. <img alt="Image titled Make an FM Antenna Step 8" src=" width="728" height="546" class="whcdn">8Solder the antenna and feed line together.

Community Q&A Ask a Question Tips Warnings Loading... Did you try these steps? Upload error Article Info. FM Antenna Connector and FM Antenna Adapter Visual Guide. FM Antenna Connector Guide For most people, identifying the connector needed for their FM receiver, tuner, or radio is going to be easy as there are those most common: F Antenna Connector If you have a threaded antenna receptacle, you will need the screw-on F or you can choose to use the quick or push on F connector.

There is no such thing as a push-on F receptacle or jack, the push-on F or quick F is only made for the screw-on F receptacle. If your stereo or tuner has a smooth connector with a tube in the middle, it probably needs a PAL female connector which is shown below. AM FM TV Reception Guide and Directory. This guide is brought to by FM DX Antenna Co, providing the best FM reception since 2004. You are reading this because you are interested in FM broadcast radio and it is generally for one of 3 reasons: you are an FM DXer that enjoys listening and identifying distant FM stations often that arrive to your location via skip (signals that go up from the transmitter antenna and bounce back down to the receiving antenna), you are a program listener that loves your music such as jazz, classical, or rock, or you are a combination that is trying to pick up particular programming from an FM station or stations at a distance, usually line-of-sight rather than skip.

As with any hobby there are tons of myths surrounding FM radio reception and some very knowledgable FM experts even buy into to a few myths. This guide will cut through much of that and point you in the direction you will need for great FM listening without spending a ton of money. Sony DAB/FM Aerial Connector. Fitting co-ax aerial socket to DAB radio that doesn't have one. *trying* to improve FM reception on my new stereo. Quote: Originally Posted by Soviet I'm 100% sure it's connected right, but the Ground is kinda just hanging there not connected to anything... Where can I connect it to? I can't connect it to a screw cause the wire isn't long enough, would I be safe extending the ground wire with another wire, then connecting it to something metal? Yes, extend the wire by soldering or using a wire nut with another length of wire. Also, in this vein, once you have a solution that works fairly well (if we can find one) you'd probably be best off to minimize the lengths of the wires in the part of the setup that you make.

Would these 2 items be all I need to solder properly? Yes, those should suffice. One reason I suggested wire nuts (and binder clips) is that it's easier to undo than solder joints. Hopefully you understood that I was suggesting you try two different configurations in turn, if not I can restate it to be more clear (I'm just unsure since you didn't address that in your reply).