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How to Nurture Your Superstar Employees - Focus on these three traits to help your top performers flourish—and stick around. Most organizations have employees who are solid performers; fewer organizations are astute—or lucky—enough to have superstars.

How to Nurture Your Superstar Employees - Focus on these three traits to help your top performers flourish—and stick around.

So how can you ensure that your organization gets the most out of those superstars? High-potential performers (or Hi-Pos) stand out due to their associative thinking skills—which help solve problems and drive innovation—their strong emotional awareness, and their incredible perseverance, according to Carter Cast, a clinical professor of innovation and entrepreneurship at the Kellogg School and former CEO of Walmart.com. Recognizing Employees Is the Simplest Way to Improve Morale. Recently I’ve been undergoing treatment for cancer, and have had access to a leading oncologist at a world-renowned medical center.

Recognizing Employees Is the Simplest Way to Improve Morale

At one point during a visit, we discussed how long she’s been practicing her specialty. She said she’s been at the same hospital for more than 40 years. Then I asked what her employers had given her to note that amazing milestone — four decades of saving lives! With a shrug of acceptance rather than indignation, she laughed and showed me a plastic key chain that had been mailed to her. Clearly, that gift was a classic employer mistake — a trivial attempt at recognition that not only missed the mark but also disappointed rather than inspired. If even doctors who save hundreds of lives each year are getting plastic key chains, it’s no wonder most workplaces suffer from what I call a “recognition deficit.” The Five Conversations Framework - From MindTools.com.

An Alternative Approach to Appraisals © iStockphotoRrrainbow Invigorate your performance reviews with good conversation.

The Five Conversations Framework - From MindTools.com

A 5-Step Process For Delivering Tough News. Maybe an employee’s work has been subpar lately.

A 5-Step Process For Delivering Tough News

Or your coworker is really botching a client interaction. It’s the dreaded moment when it’s time to tell someone a hard truth—and they’re not going to like it. Before you dive in, you’ve got to consider the situation, says CEO adviser Mindy Mackenzie, author of The Courage Solution: The Power of Truth Telling with Your Boss, Peers, and Team. 7 Tips to Help Someone Else Change a Habit. How Good is Your Feedback? - Communication Skills From MindTools.com. Giving Clear Comments to Improve Performance © iStockphotomonkeybusinessimages As a manager, one of the most important things you do is give feedback.

How Good is Your Feedback? - Communication Skills From MindTools.com

When you let people know how they're doing, you give them the chance to change unhelpful habits, and you reward and cement positive behavior. Surprising Ways To Improve Those Dreaded Year-End Reviews. Welcome to Forbes. 3 Ways to Help Someone Who's Failing. Every once in a while, you'll assign a project to an employee or colleague and about halfway through, the person will start to fail.

3 Ways to Help Someone Who's Failing

Perhaps the project was above his or her capability. Or maybe the person lost interest in the project or was distracted. Regardless, the impact is major. 3 Questions That Will Motivate Your Employees. We all want to be motivated -- and, as entrepreneurs, we love the idea of being able to motivate others.

3 Questions That Will Motivate Your Employees

Helping the Passive-Aggressive Executive - Manfred F. R. Kets de Vries. By Manfred F.

Helping the Passive-Aggressive Executive - Manfred F. R. Kets de Vries

R. Kets de Vries | 10:00 AM February 20, 2014 Robert wondered why he was always so stressed out when he was dealing with Lucas, the latest addition to his team. On the face of it, the new hire seemed very agreeable and supportive, but whatever interactions he had had with him left him wondering about his true intentions. Lucas made lots of promises but never really seemed to deliver on them. What troubled him especially was that Lucas didn’t respect deadlines. Business schools prepare us to become better at strategizing, inspiring, mentoring, team building, delegating, and so on. Lucas’s behavior is passive-aggressive: continuously expressing negative feelings, resentment, and aggression in an unassertive, passive manner. When You Criticize Someone, You Make It Harder for that Person to Change - Daniel Goleman.

By Daniel Goleman | 12:00 PM December 19, 2013 “If everything worked out perfectly in your life, what would you be doing in ten years?”

When You Criticize Someone, You Make It Harder for that Person to Change - Daniel Goleman

How to Manage Biased People - Maurice Ewing. By Maurice Ewing | 9:00 AM October 31, 2013 By now it’s generally accepted that if senior leaders suffer from cognitive biases their decisions can severely undermine company performance.

How to Manage Biased People - Maurice Ewing

Yet, leaders are not the only members of organizations that exercise poor judgment: Non-leaders are sometimes irrational too. Bearing this in mind, it is imperative that strategy-setters make explicit allowance for just how cognitively fragile their employees might be – or else they risk not fully understanding why their “perfectly rational” strategies don’t work. Take the recent case of JC Penney, which hired and abruptly fired its CEO, Ron Johnson, after the major changes he instituted took the company from bad to worse. His own cognitive biases aside, it’s unlikely that any of Johnson’s initiatives would have stuck at JC Penney without first making explicit allowance for the judgment lapses and biased mental dispositions of his new employees.