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Bill Gates Pens An Essay For the Class Of 2017. How Are Happiness and Learning Connected? We've all heard of the fight or flight response.

How Are Happiness and Learning Connected?

We go into survival mode when threatened by something or someone. We either put up our dukes (literally or metaphorically) or take off running (literally or metaphorically). Students often go into survival mode when they feel threatened by an overwhelming cognitive task or confusing text, or when they are called on and don't know the answer, or are confronted or teased by another student (or a teacher!)

Key Person & Attachment - Early Years Matters. The Key Person Children thrive from a base of loving and secure relationships.

Key Person & Attachment - Early Years Matters

This is normally provided by a child’s parents but it can also be provided by a key person. A key person is a named member of staff with responsibilities for a small group of children who helps those children in the group feel safe and cared for. The role is an important one and an approach set out in the EYFS which is working successfully in settings and in Reception classes. Whole Child Development Is Undervalued. Child development should inspire lifelong learning across different spaces and communities.

Whole Child Development Is Undervalued

Research suggests that "whole child development," not routine or standardized classroom-based learning, empowers children as creative and engaged citizens who can strengthen the wellbeing of a whole society. It is crucial, then, to nurture their creative abilities to express themselves, understand others, and navigate complex amounts of information so that they can confidently solve the problems of a world that's changing faster than ever. The question is how to make such an approach both systemic and sustainable. Whole Person Socio-emotional, physical, creative, and cognitive capacities are deeply intertwined and equally important in ensuring a child's wellbeing, learning, and growth.

Nobel laureate James Heckman, a professor of economics at the University of Chicago, has shown that the non-cognitive skills emerging in early childhood are among the strongest predictors of adult outcomes. Practical tips. By Opal Dunn, educational consultant and author Introduction Young children learn English differently from most adults.

Practical tips

Most have an innate ability to pick up English while taking part in activities, by making sense of what they are doing and picking up the adult’s language that accompanies the activity. You can find out more in the British Council booklet ‘How young children learn English as another language’, also available on the parents pages of the LearnEnglish Kids website. Planned English sessions You can plan regular sessions which will usually take place: How Are Kids Smarter Than Adults? - Video. Question: What learning capacities do we lose after childhood?

How Are Kids Smarter Than Adults? - Video

Paul Bloom: So one interesting question is, in what ways are children superior to adults? Carol Dweck: The power of believing that you can improve. Inclusion Development Programme Behaviour Emotional Social Difficulties. ZERO TO THREE. Importance of play for babies & children. How young children learn English through play. As we release Learning Time with Timmy – our first app for early-years learners of English – Danitza Villarroel, a teacher on our Learning Time with Shaun and Timmy course in Chile, explains the importance of learning through play, and offers a few tips for teachers new to this age group.

How young children learn English through play

Teaching English to pre-school children can be daunting for teachers new to this age group. Young children have shorter attention spans than older children and adults, and they're still learning their mother tongue. But teaching these learners can be enormously rewarding once you've taken a few basic principles on board. Home. Alison Gopnik: What do babies think? Deb Roy: The birth of a word. Listen to Your Mother. Young children face a remarkable challenge in learning to use the language of their culture.

Listen to Your Mother

Toddlers vary widely, however, in the rate at which they learn new words.1 A team of Harvard Graduate School of Education researchers set out to ask whether and how children's language environment can impact vocabulary development. In their study of mother-child pairs from low-income families, they found that mothers who used many different words (not just many words) had toddlers with faster growth in vocabulary use. During the toddler and preschool years, most children learn to use hundreds of words, combining them into sentences and engaging in conversation with others.

From previous research, we know that variation in vocabulary growth relates to child characteristics like gender, and also to parental factors. What did they find? 1Huttenlocher, J., Haight, W., Bryk, A., Seltzer, M., & Lyons, T. (1991). 2Bauer, D.J., Goldfield, B.A., & Reznick, J.S. (2002). 3Hoff-Ginsberg, E. (1998). Let's Talk. What do babies need in order to learn and thrive?

Let's Talk

One thing they need is conversation — responsive, back-and-forth communication with their parents and caregivers. This interactive engagement is like food for their developing brains, nurturing language acquisition, early literacy, school readiness, and social and emotional well-being. A dispiriting number of children don’t get that kind of brain-fueling communication, research suggests. In early childhood policy (and in the wider media), much attention has been paid to the so-called word gap — findings that show that low-income children hear 30 million fewer words, on average, and have less than half the vocabulary of upper-income peers by age three.

But putting that alarming number in the spotlight obscures a more critical component of the research, says Harvard Graduate School of Education literacy expert Meredith Rowe: it’s not so much the quantity of words but the quality of the talk that matters most to a child’s development. Why does my toddler love repetition? - BabyCentre. Paediatric speech and language therapist.

Why does my toddler love repetition? - BabyCentre

It may test your patience when your toddler demands 'Row, row, row your boat' for the 10th time. But there's a good reason for her insistence. Toddlers love repetition because it helps them to learn, and because it's familiar and comforting. From around the age of two, you will notice your toddler repeating the same words and phrases constantly.

How can I help my child to start talking? (Video) - BabyCentre. Health visitor Sara Patience describes how you can help develop your child's language skills by talking and playing with her.

How can I help my child to start talking? (Video) - BabyCentre

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