Geography and Global Studies

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Infographic: Tallest Mountain to Deepest Ocean Trench. Tiramisu. Makes one large trifle (Serves at least 8) Your day was hard.

Tiramisu

Maybe you have a party coming up. Or you are out of ice cream. Perhaps your favorite DVD got scratched. Or your 20 lb cat left a 1lb hairball on your favorite sweater. I have the answer for everything: make tiramisu. Plus I have a few little secrets that’ll make it the prettiest tiramisu you’ve ever seen (or tasted). NOTE: Please start this recipe the night before you need it. Recipe adapted from Loredana Moccia, who offers private Italian cooking lessons in here in Tulsa. Ingredients: 4 eggs, separated – the freshest you can find 1/3 cup caster sugar 3, 8 oz tubs marscapone cheese 40-60 lady fingers (Italian Savoiardi) 2 tsp dark cocoa powder For the dipping liquid:NOTE: Considering I like my tiramisu dry (not squishy and soggy), this makes a ton extra – feel free to cut it by half or more. 2 cups water 3 Tbsp instant espresso 3 tablespoon rum Method: Take a deep breath.

You are going to put love in your world by making tiramisu. Play Geography Games and Learn About the World. World Maps - geography online games. We're 99% certain this is the most beautiful footage of Earth's auroras yet recorded. Test Your Geography Knowledge. Introducing a free, fun service...

Test Your Geography Knowledge

New: Personalized Quiz Tracker Track your progress, earn merit stamps and compete against yourself and your friends. Sign up for a free account and you'll be able to keep track of all your quiz completions, high scores, modes and work towards mastery in many categories. More info on the Personalized Quiz Tracker. Quick introduction to the Personalized Quiz Tracker The Personalized Quiz Tracker saves your best scores and awards you with stamps as you progress.

Have you tried Study Mode yet? Study mode, launched at the end of March, provides all kinds of additional material on countries, and on the US states. Attention, teachers and students! You can now get your test results formatted to print and hand in. Having trouble? Infographic of the Day: How the Global Food Market Starves the Poor. To understand the complexities of the international food market--and how traders in Chicago can cause Africans to starve--you could get a ph.D. in economics, or read a 400-page report from the World Bank.

Infographic of the Day: How the Global Food Market Starves the Poor

Or you watch this superb nine minute video, directed by Denis van Waerebeke. Though ostensibly created for a science show in Paris for 12 year olds, it's actually probably waaaay over a kid's head. Just watch--it's excellent, and very well illustrated: The video begins with a basic question: How is it that the first world has an oversupply of food, while 1 in 7 in the world go malnourished? Basically, farmers in developing countries have eschewed growing local food crops in favor of growing things like cotton for international export.

That can have disastrous effects. The solutions will involve everyone, the world over. Still hungry for more infographics videos? [Via Infosthetics] Global Food Disparity: A Photo Diary. In an increasingly globalized world, it’s still sometimes shocking to see just how disparate our lives are compared with other human beings around the world. A book of photographs by Peter Menzel called "Hungry Planet: What the World Eats" ("©Peter Menzel www.menzelphoto.com. Ten Speed Press, published in 2005) makes a relevant point with great irony: at a time when hundreds of millions of people don't have enough to eat, hundreds of millions more are eating too much and are overweight or obese. In observing what six billion eat for dinner the authors note, "Today, more people are overweight than underweight. " It is these cultural differences, emphasized and reinforced by the author, which exemplifies the lifestyles and dietary habits of people around the world.

You can buy the book here. Meet the The Manzo family of Sicily. Germany: The Melander family of Bargteheide Food expenditure for one week: 375.39 Euros or $500.07. Country Studies.