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The Future of Nanotechnology" In the world of "Star Trek," machines called replicators can produce practically any physical object, from weapons to a steaming cup of Earl Grey tea.

The Future of Nanotechnology"

Long considered to be exclusively the product of science fiction, today some people believe replicators are a very real possibility. They call it molecular manufacturing, and if it ever does become a reality, it could drastically change the world. Atoms and molecules stick together because they have complementary shapes that lock together, or charges that attract. Just like with magnets, a positively charged atom will stick to a negatively charged atom. As millions of these atoms are pieced together by nanomachines, a specific product will begin to take shape. The first step would be to develop nanoscopic machines, called assemblers, that scientists can program to manipulate atoms and molecules at will.

Assemblers might have moving parts like the nanogears in this concept drawing. Academic Course Requirements. The courses listed here reflect the Ontario Secondary School requirements.

Academic Course Requirements

Applicants who are not currently full-time Ontario Secondary School students should review the applicant types to ensure that they meet all of the necessary requirements for admission. Programs Architecture Engineering (Chemical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Environmental, Geological, Management, Mechanical, Mechatronics, Nanotechnology, Software, Systems Design) Architecture The following Ontario 12 U courses and two other 12 U or 12 M courses are required: Advanced Functions Calculus and Vectors Physics English. 5170_en. Nanotechnology in Medicine - Nanomedicine. The use of nanotechnology in medicine offers some exciting possibilities.

Nanotechnology in Medicine - Nanomedicine

Some techniques are only imagined, while others are at various stages of testing, or actually being used today. Nanotechnology in medicine involves applications of nanoparticles currently under development, as well as longer range research that involves the use of manufactured nano-robots to make repairs at the cellular level (sometimes referred to as nanomedicine). Whatever you call it, the use of nanotechnology in the field of medicine could revolutionize the way we detect and treat damage to the human body and disease in the future, and many techniques only imagined a few years ago are making remarkable progress towards becoming realities. Nanotechnology in Medicine Application: Drug Delivery One application of nanotechnology in medicine currently being developed involves employing nanoparticles to deliver drugs, heat, light or other substances to specific types of cells (such as cancer cells).

Nanotechnology. Nanotechnology ("nanotech") is the manipulation of matter on an atomic, molecular, and supramolecular scale.

Nanotechnology

The earliest, widespread description of nanotechnology[1][2] referred to the particular technological goal of precisely manipulating atoms and molecules for fabrication of macroscale products, also now referred to as molecular nanotechnology. A more generalized description of nanotechnology was subsequently established by the National Nanotechnology Initiative, which defines nanotechnology as the manipulation of matter with at least one dimension sized from 1 to 100 nanometers. This definition reflects the fact that quantum mechanical effects are important at this quantum-realm scale, and so the definition shifted from a particular technological goal to a research category inclusive of all types of research and technologies that deal with the special properties of matter that occur below the given size threshold. Origins[edit] Comparison of Nanomaterials Sizes.