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Felice Varini: Landscapes of Perspective and Illusion | Johnston Architects To walk into a space exhibiting the art of Felice Varini is to be confused. You’ll immediately notice vaguely geometric, monocolor shapes stretchings and sprawling across the room, but you won’t be able to determine any kind of method to the apparent madness. Varini’s work looks like interesting abstract art superimposed on an architectural space. But if you walk around and explore the space a little more, you’ll start to notice that the shapes change as you move. The more you move, and the more you stare at them, the more you’ll start to realize that there’s something you aren’t getting. Felice Varini: Landscapes of Perspective and Illusion | Johnston Architects
Scientists are one step closer to knowing what you’ve seen by reading your mind. Having modeled how images are represented in the brain, the researchers translated recorded patterns of neural activity into pictures of what test subjects had seen. Though practical applications are decades away, the research could someday lead to dream-readers and thought-controlled computers. “It’s what you would actually use if you were going to build a functional brain-reading device,” said Jack Gallant, a University of California, Berkeley neuroscientist. The research, led by Gallant and Berkeley postdoctoral researcher Thomas Naselaris, builds on earlier work in which they used neural patterns to identify pictures from within a limited set of options. Brain Scans Reveal What You’ve Seen | Wired Science Brain Scans Reveal What You’ve Seen | Wired Science
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wireless brain scanners - Google Search
World’s first mobile brain scanner with a Nokia N900 Conversations' Karen Bartlett met the team who can read your mind with a phone. Be afraid, this is pretty scary stuff. Jim Fallon is a world-renowned neuroscientist. He’s also a potential psychopath, or so say the results of a brain scan and a series of genetic tests that he undertook to check if he was prone to Alzheimer’s disease. “Luckily I took those tests at the end of my career, I was just at the point of retiring. I know that I’ve never hurt anyone, or gone to jail. World’s first mobile brain scanner with a Nokia N900
WirelessPhysiologicalMonitoring
ANFA is delighted to announce the first Hay Fund Grant Recipients: Sergei Gepshtein, Ph.D., Alex McDowell, R.D.I, and Greg Lynn, M.Arch for their project entitled: Vision Science for Dynamic Architecture. Click here to read more. ANFA board member, Dr. Fred Gage, will be one of the scientists researching common links between diseases such as cancer, Alzhiemer's and diabetes at the Helmsley Center for Genomic Research. This center is being funded by a $42 million donation from the New York-based Helmsley Charitable Trust to the Salk Institute for Biological Studies and will involve 12 of the Salk's 44 laboratories. On January 11, 2013, The New York Times posted an article on architecture and mental health. ANFA - Academy of Neuroscience for Architecture

ANFA - Academy of Neuroscience for Architecture

Michael Hansmeyer - Computational Architecture: Columns
RECORDING THE CONVERSATION