Interesting Ideas

Facebook Twitter
kottke.org - home of fine hypertext products Classic paintings brought to life by subtle motion JAN 16 Rino Stefano Tagliafierro took more than 100 paintings (from the likes of Reubens, Caravaggio, Rembrandt, and Vermeer) and set them in motion to music to form a slow motion oil painted dreamland. Lots of boobs, butts, penises, and even the occasional hint of sexual gesture in this one -- the motion sometimes fills in the blanks on all of those frolicking nymph-type paintings, making them seem to modern eyes even more sexist and outdated than the static paintings. There are some definite porny moments, is what I'm saying. So yeah, probably NSFW.

kottke.org - home of fine hypertext products

TED: Ideas worth spreading Melinda Gates and Bill Gates Why giving away our wealth has been the most satisfying thing we've done In 1993, Bill and Melinda Gates—then engaged—took a walk on a beach in Zanzibar, and made a bold decision on how they would make sure that their wealth from Microsoft went back into society. In a conversation with Chris Anderson, the couple talks about their work at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, as well as about their marriage, their children, their failures and the satisfaction of giving most of their wealth away.

TED: Ideas worth spreading

The 99 Percent - It's not about ideas. It's about making ideas happen.

The 99 Percent - It's not about ideas. It's about making ideas happen.

Draw the Line: Finding Your Work-Life Balance What’s the thing only *you* can do well? Top Weekend Reads: The Least Valuable Colleges & Majors This week's most popular links. #labrat: Are Daily Logbooks Worth the Work?
Brain Pickings By: Maria Popova “Through our scopes, we see ourselves. Every new lens is also a new mirror.” Given my longtime fascination with the so-termed digital humanities and with data visualization, and my occasional dabbles in the intersection of the two, I’ve followed the work of data scholars Erez Aiden and Jean-Baptiste Michel with intense interest since its public beginnings. Now, they have collected and contextualized their findings in the compelling Uncharted: Big Data as a Lens on Human Culture (public library) — a stimulating record of their seven-year quest to quantify cultural change through the dual lens of history and digital data by analyzing the contents of the 30,000 books digitized by Google, using Google’s Ngram viewer tool to explore how the usage frequency of specific words changes over time and what that might reveal about corresponding shifts in our cultural values and beliefs about economics, politics, health, science, the arts, and more.

Brain Pickings