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Dali's enigma, Picasso's protest: the most important artworks of the 1930s. Salvador Dalí’s The Enigma of Hitler is a ghostly farewell to the 1930s.

Dali's enigma, Picasso's protest: the most important artworks of the 1930s

Painted in the last year of the decade, when Hitler’s invasion of Poland finally brought the years of appeasement to an end, its image of a melting telephone suspended above a photograph of the Führer torn from a newspaper and lying on a plate (otherwise empty except for a few dry beans) recalls the long-distance conversations of barren diplomacy, the anxiety of hearing the latest shocking news, the dread of waiting for war. An umbrella that could easily belong to the prime minister Neville Chamberlain hangs impotently in the ether, fading away – as colourless as the bleak landscape with which Dalí holds a mirror to his age. Long Before There Was 'Fake News,' There Were 'Fake Photos' : Goats and Soda. Orientalist Study, 1858.

Long Before There Was 'Fake News,' There Were 'Fake Photos' : Goats and Soda

The two men are in fact white Europeans, posing in a London studio. Roger Fenton (English, 1819–1869)/Featured at the Clark Art Institute hide caption. Van Gogh Documentary To Be First Fully Painted Feature Film Ever Made. Vanessa Ruiz: The spellbinding art of human anatomy. Auto mechanics pay homage to the legendary artworks of Renaissance painters. American photographer Freddy Fabris created unusual versions of famous Renaissance paintings.

Auto mechanics pay homage to the legendary artworks of Renaissance painters

The idea came to him during a visit to a garage somewhere in the western United States. ’Why not?’ Thought Fabris, who decided to combine the uncombinable. The photographer tried to preserve the distinctive style of great Renaissance master painters, ever so slightly spicing it up. Theconversation. How does art help us survive?

theconversation

This is a question that clearly fascinates MONA founder David Walsh. MoMA Curator Laura Hoptman on How to Tell a Good Painting From a “Bogus” Painting. Effective date: February 12, 2014.

MoMA Curator Laura Hoptman on How to Tell a Good Painting From a “Bogus” Painting

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Philosophers Rumble Over Van Gogh’s Shoes

Some might wonder how an exhibition can be framed around a single work with such a modest subject matter, but the curators provide us an impressive model. The exhibition focuses on the extraordinary role this painting has played in modern philosophy surrounding art, its reception, and its relationship to the history of ideas. A half dozen philosophers and art historians have written about van Gogh’s painting of shoes, including Martin Heidegger, Meyer Schapiro, and Jacques Derrida. The exhibition takes us on a trip through their writings—sometimes comic, occasionally downright rude, and often exhilarating.

These thinkers certainly bar no holds in their clamber to be exceedingly profound. Why Bob Dylan deserves his Nobel literature win. Tracy Chevalier: Finding the story inside the painting. Why art is important. What is art for? Alain de Botton's animated guide – video. ‘Based on a true story’: the fine line between fact and fiction. Frontiers are always changing, advancing.

‘Based on a true story’: the fine line between fact and fiction

Borders are fixed, man-made, squabbled about and jealously fought over. The frontier is an exciting, demanding – and frequently lawless – place to be. Borders are policed, often tense; if they become too porous then they’re not doing the job for which they were intended. Occasionally, though, the border is the frontier. That’s the situation now with regard to fiction and nonfiction. For many years this was a peaceful, uncontested and pretty deserted space. While it’s important not to convert prejudices into manifesto pledges, my experience is in keeping with actuarial norms: middle-aged now, I look forward to the days when I join that gruffly contented portion of the male population that reads only military history. As a consequence, the one thing I don’t go to fiction for, these days, is entertainment. Within the sprawl of nonfiction there is as much genre- and convention-dependency as in fiction. Don’t let me be misunderstood. Cleaner throws artwork into bin in Italy - would you have made the same mistake?

An art exhibit in Italy has been restored after it was binned by a cleaner, who mistook it for a mess from the previous night.

Cleaner throws artwork into bin in Italy - would you have made the same mistake?

The artwork, by famous Milan female duo Sara Goldschmied and Eleonora Chiar, is called “Where shall we go dancing tonight?” , and consists of cigarette butts, empty champagne bottles and confetti, set about in a decadent way. An avant-garde exhibit, it is intended to represent the hedonism and political corruption of the 1980s. The cleaner thought the artwork was rubbish from a party and carefully separated the glass, plastic and paper into individual bags and tidied everything up. 6 Photographers Capture Same Person But Results Vary Widely Because of a Twist (VIDEO) Undiscovered country: the Globe's travelling Hamlet in a Jordanian refugee camp.