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Periodic Table Writer - Chemistry Elements » My Fun Studio. Forensic Science Starters. What if..... Loading [MathJax]/extensions/MathMenu.js July 10, 2012 July 17, 2012 July 24, 2012 July 31, 2012 August 7, 2012 August 14, 2012 August 21, 2012 August 28, 2012 September 4, 2012 September 11, 2012 September 18, 2012 September 25, 2012 October 2, 2012.

What if.....

Picture of the Day rkrampf's blog. Current position of the ISS. World Clock. Bubble-gum. Saving Sam. This is an activity for the first day or as an introduction to the scientific method.

Saving Sam

There are a few variations on the web of this activity. Only You Can Help Save Sam (google docs file) - this one has extensive questions and illustrations sections for groups to turn in Only You Can Help Save Sam (.doc file from biologyjunction) Sam is stuck on a boat, and how he got there is not important, but Sam can't swim and the boat is capsized. To get to shore, Sam needs to retrieve a life jacket from underneath the boat so that he can float to shore. You and your partner's job is to save Sam but retrieving the life jacket from under the boat and putting it on Sam. A gummy worm is used to represent Sam, a gummy life saver is the life preserver and an overturned cup represents the boat.

*It also may enhance the activity to mention that worms are hermaphrodites, and Sam is technically both boy and girl, which makes the name rather appropriate. Some Uses For this Activity: NSTA: Blick on Flicks. Read the review | Listen to it!

NSTA: Blick on Flicks

We all love watching movies. But we also love science. And sometimes the two don't mix! To help us sort the good science from the bad in movies and other visual media, Jacob Clark Blickenstaff, PhD, provides expert commentary, pointing out where the physics is stretched, the chemistry fudged, or the biology twisted on behalf of the story—without losing sight of the fact that movies are meant to entertain. Jacob helps turn "bad science" into teachable science for middle level and high school students.

Blick on Flicks is a regular column in NSTA Reports and a periodic feature of NSTA WebNews. Science and the Winter Olympics (2014.03.24): Read the review | Listen to it! Jacob Clark Blickenstaff is the program director for Washington State Leadership and Assistance for Science Education Reform in Seattle. Amazing pictures fascinating photos images. Why Does the Water Rise? This experiment requires the use of matches... and that means adult supervision.

Why Does the Water Rise?

Fill a plastic cup up with water. About 9 oz. should do the trick. Add 2 or 3 drops of food coloring to the water. This will make the movement of the water easier to see later on in the experiment. Pour the water into the plate or pan and place the candle in the middle of the water. The candle flame heats the air in the vase, and this hot air expands. A common misconception regarding this experiment is that the consumption of the oxygen inside of the bottle is also a factor in the water rising. To further demonstrate how the expansion and contraction of air within a bottle can cause water to rise, try this experiment using hot and cold water:

Science Misconceptions. Misconceptions can be referred to as a preconceived notion or a conceptual misunderstanding. These are cases in which something a person knows and believes does not match what is known to be scientifically correct. A lot of people who hold misconceptions do not even know that their ideas are false or incorrect. When they are told they are wrong, they often have a hard time giving up their misconceptions, especially if they have had a misconception for a long time.

Imagine someone telling you your father was not actually your father, but your mother! What is especially worrisome about misconceptions is that people continue to build knowledge on their current understandings. Below is a listing of some tools to help address misconceptions. User Submitted Science Misconceptions See what other science teachers think are some of the biggest misconceptions in their science classrooms.

NSF Survey Results SummaryListing of survey results. MAKE HOMEMADE SCIENCE TOYS AND PROJECTS. Science, Technology - Dr. Bob's Home Page. Science is the observation, investigation, and explanation of the things that happen around us.

Science, Technology - Dr. Bob's Home Page

This site is devoted to the wonders of science and technology. This is an interactive place where you can explore, learn, and ask questions. The focus is on unusual, interesting, and thought provoking topics. I hope that you enjoy exploring Dr. Bob's Interesting Science Stuff. Interesting Science Stuff..... WOW! Fascinating Science and Technology Links About this Site & Dr. Site Awards: This site is optimized for Netscape 2.0 / Microsoft Internet Explorer 3.0 and above. Top 10 Scientific Music Videos. Storytelling. Science Cartoons, Graphics and Clip Art. Science Ideas.