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Neuropsychologia

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Attentional shifting and the role of the dorsal pathway in visual word recognition. Attentional shifting and the role of the dorsal pathway in visual word recognition np06. Auditory processing, speech perception and phonological ability in pre-school children at high-risk for dyslexia: A longitudinal study of the auditory temporal processing theory. A Centre for Disability, Special Needs Education and Child Care, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgiumb ExpORL, Department Neurosciences, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium Received 29 June 2006, Revised 9 January 2007, Accepted 10 January 2007, Available online 16 January 2007 Choose an option to locate/access this article: Check if you have access through your login credentials or your institution.

Auditory processing, speech perception and phonological ability in pre-school children at high-risk for dyslexia: A longitudinal study of the auditory temporal processing theory

Lateralized temporal order judgement in dyslexia. A Division of Psychiatry, University of Nottingham, UKb Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of South Carolina, USAc School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, UK Received 22 December 2008, Revised 19 July 2009, Accepted 5 August 2009, Available online 12 August 2009 Choose an option to locate/access this article: Check if you have access through your login credentials or your institution Check access doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2009.08.007 Get rights and content Abstract Temporal and spatial attentional deficits in dyslexia were investigated using a lateralized visual temporal order judgment (TOJ) paradigm that allowed both sensitivity to temporal order and spatial attentional bias to be measured.

Lateralized temporal order judgement in dyslexia

Keywords Dyslexia; Attentional deficit; Temporal order judgement; Mini-neglect; Reading disorder Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. Learning and retrieving holistic and componential visual-verbal associations in reading and object naming. <div class="msgBox" style="margin-top:10px;"><span class="errMsg"><div>JavaScript is disabled on your browser.

Learning and retrieving holistic and componential visual-verbal associations in reading and object naming

Please enable JavaScript to use all the features on this page. This page uses JavaScript to progressively load the article content as a user scrolls. Click the View full text link to bypass dynamically loaded article content. <a rel="nofollow" href=" full text</a></div></span></div><br /> Volume 98, April 2017, Pages 68–84 Special Issue: The Neural Basis of Language Learning Edited By Kate Watkins, Denise Klein and Ingrid Johnsrude. Number reading in pure alexia—A review. Open Access Abstract It is commonly assumed that number reading can be intact in patients with pure alexia, and that this dissociation between letter/word recognition and number reading strongly constrains theories of visual word processing.

Number reading in pure alexia—A review

A truly selective deficit in letter/word processing would strongly support the hypothesis that there is a specialized system or area dedicated to the processing of written words. To date, however, there has not been a systematic review of studies investigating number reading in pure alexia and so the status of this assumed dissociation is unclear. We review the literature on pure alexia from 1892 to 2010, and find no well-documented classical dissociation between intact number reading and impaired letter identification in a patient with pure alexia. Highlights Keywords Pure alexia; Alexia without agraphia; Letter-by-letter reading; Visual recognition; Number reading; Dissociation 1.

Another challenge concerns what constitutes a dissociation. Phonological dyslexia and phonological impairment: An exception to the rule? Reduced hemispheric asymmetry of the auditory N260m in dyslexia. University of Konstanz, Department of Psychology, PO-Box D 25, 78457 Konstanz, Germany Received 21 January 2005, Revised 15 July 2005, Accepted 21 July 2005, Available online 29 August 2005 Choose an option to locate/access this article: Check if you have access through your login credentials or your institution Check access doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2005.07.011 Get rights and content Abstract Dyslexia seems to be related to a lack of planum temporale (PT) asymmetry that is accompanied by functional differences to control subjects in both left and right hemispheric temporal regions during language tasks.

Reduced hemispheric asymmetry of the auditory N260m in dyslexia

The significance of visual information processing in reading: Insights from hemianopic dyslexia. Reviews and perspectives a Department of Psychology, University of Durham, UKb Department of Psychology, Neuropsychology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Germanyc Max-Planck-Institute of Psychiatry, Germany Received 26 August 2007, Revised 18 April 2008, Accepted 25 April 2008, Available online 2 May 2008 Choose an option to locate/access this article: Check if you have access through your login credentials or your institution Check access.

The significance of visual information processing in reading: Insights from hemianopic dyslexia