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Neuropsychologia. Cognition. Neuron. Science Direct - Auditory Processing Disorder. A dual-route perspective on poor reading in a regular orthography: An fMRI study. A systematic review of controlled trials on visual stress using Intuitive Overlays or the Intuitive Colorimeter. Brain Imaging Findings in Dyslexia. <div pearltreesdevid="PTD238" role="alert" class="alert-message-container"><div pearltreesdevid="PTD239" aria-hidden="true" class="alert-message-body"><span pearltreesdevid="PTD240" style="display: inline-block;" class="Icon IconAlert"><svg pearltreesDevId="PTD241" style="width: 100%; height: 100%;" width="24" height="24" focusable="false" tabindex="-1" fill="currentColor"><path pearltreesDevId="PTD242" fill="#f80" d="M11.84 4.63c-.77.05-1.42.6-1.74 1.27-1.95 3.38-3.9 6.75-5.85 10.13-.48.83-.24 1.99.53 2.56.7.6 1.66.36 2.5.41 3.63 0 7.27.01 10.9-.01 1.13-.07 2.04-1.28 1.76-2.39-.1-.58-.56-1.02-.81-1.55-1.85-3.21-3.69-6.43-5.55-9.64-.42-.52-1.06-.83-1.74-.79z"></path><path pearltreesDevId="PTD243" d="M11 8h2v5h-2zM11 14h2v2h-2z"></path></svg></span><!

Brain Imaging Findings in Dyslexia

-- react-text: 50 -->JavaScript is disabled on your browser. Please enable JavaScript to use all the features on this page. <! -- /react-text --></div></div> References. Children with developmental dyslexia show a left visual “minineglect” Open Archive Abstract We investigated the performance of children with developmental dyslexia on a visual line bisection task.

Children with developmental dyslexia show a left visual “minineglect”

Dyslexic children did not show the overestimation of the left visual field (pseudoneglect) characteristic of normal adult vision. These results suggest that children with developmental dyslexia present selective deficits in visual attention, probably involving neural structures located in the right posterior parietal cortex. Keywords Developmental dyslexia; Attention; Pseudoneglect. Children with dyslexia lack multiple specializations along the visual word-form (VWF) system. A MR-Center, University Children's Hospital, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerlandb Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerlandc Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, USAd Department of Neurology, Technische Universität München, (81675) München, Germanye Agora Center, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finlandf Department of Psychology and Center for Neurocognitive Research, University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austriag Department of Neurology and Center for Neurocognitive Research, Christian Doppler Clinic, Paracelsus Private Medical University, Salzburg, Austriah Center for Integrative Human Physiology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerlandi Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, Germany.

Children with dyslexia lack multiple specializations along the visual word-form (VWF) system

Cultural Confusions Show that Facial Expressions Are Not Universal: Current Biology. Figure 1 Fixation Distributions (A) Fixation distributions for each observer group collapsed across race of face and seven expression categories (see Figure S2 for fixation distributions for each condition separately).

Cultural Confusions Show that Facial Expressions Are Not Universal: Current Biology

Color-coded distributions represent the density of fixations across face regions, with red showing the most densely fixated regions. Note that for East Asian (EA) observers, fixations are biased toward the upper part of the face as compared to Western Caucasian (WC) observers, where fixations are more evenly distributed across the face, including the mouth. (B) Fixation distributions for “surprise,” “fear,” “disgust,” and “anger.” Figure 2 Fixation Sequences for “Surprise,” “Fear,” “Anger,” and “Disgust” Successions of color-coded circles represent the fixation sequences extracted via minimum description length analysis, with each circle representing a face region. Developmental dyslexia is characterized by the co-existence of visuospatial and phonological disorders in Chinese children. Open Archive Summary Developmental dyslexia is a neurological condition that is characterized by severe impairment in reading skill acquisition in people with adequate intelligence and typical schooling 1, 2 and 3.

Developmental dyslexia is characterized by the co-existence of visuospatial and phonological disorders in Chinese children

For English readers, reading impairment is critically associated with a phonological processing disorder 3, 4 and 5, which may co-occur with an orthographic (visual word form) processing deficit [6], but not with a general visual processing dysfunction in most dyslexics [7]. The pathophysiology of dyslexia varies across languages [8]: for instance, unlike English, written Chinese maps visually intricate graphic forms (characters) onto meanings; pronunciation of Chinese characters must be rote memorized.

This suggests that, in Chinese, a fine-grained visuospatial analysis must be performed to activate characters' phonology and meaning; consequently, disordered phonological processing may commonly co-exist with abnormal visuospatial processing in Chinese dyslexia. Main Text. Disorders of higher visual processing. Volume 102, 2011, Pages 223–261 Neuro-ophthalmology Edited By Christopher Kennard and R.

Disorders of higher visual processing

John Leigh. Do people use language production to make predictions during comprehension? Opinion 1 Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, 7 George Square, Edinburgh EH8 9JZ, UK2 Department of Psychology, University of Glasgow, 58 Hillhead Street, Glasgow G12 8QB, UK Available online 24 January 2007 Choose an option to locate/access this article: Check if you have access through your login credentials or your institution Check access doi:10.1016/j.tics.2006.12.002 Get rights and content We present the case that language comprehension involves making simultaneous predictions at different linguistic levels and that these predictions are generated by the language production system.

Do people use language production to make predictions during comprehension?

Copyright © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. Exploring the role of auditory analysis in atypical compared to typical language development. Open Access Highlights Auditory and language skills were tested in 28 11-year olds with dyslexic traits.

Exploring the role of auditory analysis in atypical compared to typical language development

Explosive, oppositional, and aggressive behavior in children with autism compared to other clinical disorders and typical children. Department of Psychiatry, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, United States Received 16 August 2011, Accepted 17 August 2011, Available online 21 September 2011 Choose an option to locate/access this article: Check if you have access through your login credentials or your institution.

Explosive, oppositional, and aggressive behavior in children with autism compared to other clinical disorders and typical children

Integrating MRI brain imaging studies of pre-reading children with current theories of developmental dyslexia: a review and quantitative meta-analysis. <div class="msgBox" style="margin-top:10px;"><span class="errMsg"><div>JavaScript is disabled on your browser.

Integrating MRI brain imaging studies of pre-reading children with current theories of developmental dyslexia: a review and quantitative meta-analysis

Please enable JavaScript to use all the features on this page. This page uses JavaScript to progressively load the article content as a user scrolls. Click the View full text link to bypass dynamically loaded article content. Learning and Cognitive Disorders: Multidiscipline Treatment Approaches Review Article. ScienceDirect is phasing out support for older versions of Internet Explorer on Jan 12, 2016. For the best product experience, we recommend you upgrade to a newer version of IE or use a different browser: Firefox or Chrome. For additional information please see the ScienceDirect Blog page. Close ScienceDirect is phasing out support for older versions of Internet Explorer on Jan 12, 2016. For the best product experience, we recommend you upgrade to a newer version of IE or use a different browser: Firefox or Chrome. Metabolic and mitochondrial disorders associated with epilepsy in children with autism spectrum disorder.

Highlights •Many children with ASD have underlying metabolic conditions. •Metabolic disorders are also commonly associated with epilepsy. •Treating metabolic disorders may optimize seizure management. Abstract Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affects a significant number of individuals in the United States, with the prevalence continuing to grow. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled “Autism and Epilepsy”. Neural bases of childhood speech disorders: Lateralization and plasticity for speech functions during development. Review a Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford Street, London WC1N 1EH, UKb Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, Australiac Royal Childrens Hospital, Melbourne, Australiad Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia Received 3 June 2011, Revised 7 July 2011, Accepted 23 July 2011, Available online 30 July 2011 Choose an option to locate/access this article: Check if you have access through your login credentials or your institution Check access.

Neural changes underlying the development of episodic memory during middle childhood. Potential hormonal mechanisms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder: A new perspective. Review a Psychology Department, University of New Orleans, USAb Psychology Department, Michigan State University, USA Received 12 September 2008, Revised 9 January 2009, Accepted 10 February 2009, Available online 2 March 2009 Choose an option to locate/access this article: Check if you have access through your login credentials or your institution.

Procedural learning is impaired in dyslexia: Evidence from a meta-analysis of serial reaction time studies. Open Access Highlight A systematic review and meta-analysis was used to investigate whether procedural learning is impaired in dyslexia. The review confirms dyslexia is associated with a procedural learning impairment. Differences in study findings may reflect compensatory mechanisms associated with the declarative memory system. Abstract A number of studies have investigated procedural learning in dyslexia using serial reaction time (SRT) tasks. Keywords. Sequential or simultaneous visual processing deficit in developmental dyslexia? Open Archive. The two-component model of memory development, and its potential implications for educational settings. Abstract We recently introduced a two-component model of the mechanisms underlying age differences in memory functioning across the lifespan. According to this model, memory performance is based on associative and strategic components.

The associative component is relatively mature by middle childhood, whereas the strategic component shows a maturational lag and continues to develop until young adulthood. Focusing on work from our own lab, we review studies from the domains of episodic and working memory informed by this model, and discuss their potential implications for educational settings.

The episodic memory studies uncover the latent potential of the associative component in childhood by documenting children's ability to greatly improve their memory performance following mnemonic instruction and training. Highlights. Two types of phonological dyslexia – A contemporary review. Review. Using in vivo probabilistic tractography to reveal two segregated dorsal ‘language-cognitive’ pathways in the human brain. Open Access Highlights The dorsal stream has been postulated to constitute multiple pathways. Tractography was used to map the connectivity of regions within the left SMG. The arcuate fasciculus was subdivided into dorso-dorsal/ventro-dorsal pathways. The parallel pathways appear to underlie functional heterogeneity within the SMG. Why is the processing of global motion impaired in adults with developmental dyslexia?