Javascript

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Automatically minify and combine JavaScript in Visual Studio - Encosia As you begin developing more complex client-side functionality, managing the size and shape of your JavaScript includes becomes a key concern. It’s all too easy to accidentally end up with hundreds of kilobytes of JavaScript spread across many separate HTTP requests, significantly slowing down your initial page loads. To combat this, it’s important to combine and compress your JavaScript. While there are useful standalone tools and HttpHandler based solutions to the problem already, none of them work quite how I prefer. Instead, I’m going to show you my dead-simple method for automatically compressing and combining script includes. To accomplish that in this post, we will select a compression utility, learn how to use it at the command line, explore a useful automation feature in Visual Studio, and apply that to keep scripts combined and compressed with no ongoing effort. Automatically minify and combine JavaScript in Visual Studio - Encosia

Dive Into HTML5

Dive Into HTML5 Dive Into HTML5 elaborates on a hand-picked selection of features from the HTML5 specification and other fine standards. We encourage you to buy the printed work — Mark Pilgrim’s artfully titled “HTML5: Up & Running” — published on paper by O’Reilly, under the Google Press imprint. Your kind and sincere feedback is always welcome, and this work shall remain online under the CC-BY-3.0 license. This particular edition of Dive Into HTML5 is advanced by the diveintomark team. We work hard to add and update content, links, APIs, and actively maintain this fine resource; refreshing and reflecting the relevant and current state of HTML5, just as Mark Pilgrim did during his tenure. We attribute this work in the manner specified by Mark, and we make modifications to the site's content.
Introduction Mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets usually have a capacitive touch-sensitive screen to capture interactions made with the user's fingers. As the mobile web evolves to enable increasingly sophisticated applications, web developers need a way to handle these events. For example, nearly any fast-paced game requires the player to press multiple buttons at once, which, in the context of a touchscreen, implies multi-touch. HTML5 Rocks - Developing for Multi-Touch Web Browsers HTML5 Rocks - Developing for Multi-Touch Web Browsers

node.js

An example: Webserver This simple web server written in Node responds with "Hello World" for every request. To run the server, put the code into a file example.js and execute it with the node program from the command line: % node example.js Server running at http://127.0.0.1:1337/ Here is an example of a simple TCP server which listens on port 1337 and echoes whatever you send it: node.js
The prototype object of JavaScript The prototype object of JavaScript No, we're not going to discuss how to construct a new version of JavaScript in this tutorial. The prototype object of JavaScript, introduced starting in JavaScript 1.1, is a prebuilt object that simplifies the process of adding custom properties/ methods to all instances of an object. I know, I'm starting to sound a little geeky already, but hay, JavaScript isn't just about fun and games...it's important to learn the serious side of it too. A little background first... The prototype object of JavaScript
JavaScript prototype Property