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Analyzing Famous Speeches as Arguments. ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, videos, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you. More Find the latest in professional publications, learn new techniques and strategies, and find out how you can connect with other literacy professionals. More Teacher Resources by Grade Your students can save their work with Student Interactives. More Home › Classroom Resources › Lesson Plans Lesson Plan Student Objectives Session One Session Two Session Three Session Four Session Five Extensions Student Assessment/Reflections Students will analyze a speech for rhetorical devices and their purpose.identify an author’s purposeful manipulation of language.identify elements of argument within a speech.write an analysis of a speech with in-text documentation. back to top Session One Begin the lesson by asking students what needs to be present in order for a speech to occur.

Saro's Corner: Table Topics: Theme "Thanksgiving" Thanksgiving provides as an opportunity to meet, greet and celebrate. The following are some table topics questions for your toastmasters club meeting with the theme as "Thanksgiving". (Also read: Table Topics - Theme "Halloween") 1) What is your most memorable Thanksgiving cooking experience? Why? 2) I hate Thanksgiving weekend because ... 3) If you would like to call someone as a turkey, who would that be? 4) Give us 5 reasons why we shouldn't eat turkeys on Thanksgiving weekend. 5) If you get an opportunity to go on a date with someone on Thanksgiving day? 6) I love Thanksgiving weekend because ... 7) What is your most memorable Thanksgiving weekend? 8) Whom do you like to Thank the most in your life?

9) If you get an option to change the Turkey in the Thanksgiving menu, which one would you go for (instead of Turkey)? 10) If you have to convince a vegetarian to eat Turkey on Thanksgiving - what would you do? 11) You are a boss in the IT company. (Also read: Table Topics: Theme "Christmas") Establishing Arguments. Summary: These OWL resources will help you develop and refine the arguments in your writing. Contributors:Stacy Weida, Karl StolleyLast Edited: 2013-03-11 12:56:30 There are three types of rhetorical appeals, or persuasive strategies, used in arguments to support claims and respond to opposing arguments. A good argument will generally use a combination of all three appeals to make its case. Logos Logos or the appeal to reason relies on logic or reason. Inductive reasoning takes a specific representative case or facts and then draws generalizations or conclusions from them.

Fair trade agreements have raised the quality of life for coffee producers, so fair trade agreements could be used to help other farmers as well. In this example the specific case of fair trade agreements with coffee producers is being used as the starting point for the claim. Deductive reasoning begins with a generalization and then applies it to a specific case. Avoid Logical Fallacies Ethos Pathos. A Step-by-Step Plan for Teaching Argumentative Writing. Listen to this post as a podcast: Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 33:27 — 46.3MB) Subscribe: iTunes | Android | For seven years, I was a writing teacher. Yes, I was certified to teach the full spectrum of English language arts—literature, grammar and usage, speech, drama, and so on—but my absolute favorite, the thing I loved doing the most, was teaching students how to write. Most of the material on this site is directed at all teachers. I look for and put together resources that would appeal to any teacher who teaches any subject.

So let’s begin with argumentative writing, or persuasive writing, as many of us used to call it. Before I start, I should note that what I describe in this post is a fairly formulaic style of essay writing. So here’s how I teach argumentative essay writing. One of the most effective ways to improve student writing is to show them mentor texts, examples of excellent writing within the genre students are about to attempt themselves. So that’s it. Picture This: Combining Infographics and Argumentative Writing.

ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, videos, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you. More Find the latest in professional publications, learn new techniques and strategies, and find out how you can connect with other literacy professionals. More Teacher Resources by Grade Your students can save their work with Student Interactives. More Home › Classroom Resources › Lesson Plans Lesson Plan Student Objectives Session One: Introduction to Argumentative Writing Session Two: Researching Online Session Three: Writing Session Four: Editing Session Five: Creating the Infographic Session Six: Finishing the Infographic Session Seven: Sharing Extensions Student Assessment/Reflections Students will analyze infographic samples.write argumentative essays after researching topics.create their own infographics to illustrate their research. back to top Session Three: Writing.

Developing Evidence-Based Arguments from Texts. Grades 9 – 12 | Lesson Plan | Standard Lesson And in Conclusion: Inquiring into Strategies for Writing Effective Conclusions While drafting a literary analysis essay (or another type of argument) of their own, students work in pairs to investigate advice for writing conclusions and to analyze conclusions of sample essays. They then draft two conclusions for their essay, select one, and reflect on what they have learned through the process. Grades 9 – 12 | Lesson Plan | Unit Reading Shakespeare's The Tempest through a Postcolonial Lens Students take a postcolonial perspective on the portrayal of Caliban from Shakespeare's The Tempest by comparing it to a modern adaptation of the play. Argument, Persuasion, or Propaganda? Students analyze World War II posters, as a group and then independently, to explore how argument, persuasion and propaganda differ. Analyzing Famous Speeches as Arguments Modeling Academic Writing Through Scholarly Article Presentations.

MSPDP.06.Judge.Instructions.And.Rubric. Debating An Introduction For Beginners. For Teachers — Middle School Public Debate Program. 5 Tips for Teaching Project-Based Debate in Middle School. Amber Chandler Project-based debate is a powerful tool to teach many high impact skills students need to be successful — research, persuasion, argumentation, speaking and listening skills, and use of evidence. Yet, middle level educators often shy away from debate because the logistics seem overwhelming, or they realize that middle school students will need quite a bit of scaffolding to become good debaters.

However, last year I decided that a debate would round out a unit I had been doing around the short story version of “Flowers for Algernon” and decided to give it a try–as a project-based learning experience. Debate proved to be the perfect way to propel students past simple literary responses. Additionally, the project-based structure allowed students a comfort level that they weren’t going it alone, and it encouraged a much deeper understanding of the larger societal issues suggested by the text itself. Teach “Deep Listening” Stretch Across the Curriculum For more check out:

Debate Research Sites. Best debate research choices are Issues and Controversies or World News Digest. Some of the other databases may be useful for background information on your topic. Public Agenda - Unbiased, nonpartisan, research on current issues HRHS Library Catalog - Search for books on your debate topic (available only at HRHS) Annenberg Political Fact Check - Nonpartisan site sponsored by the University of Pennsylvania. Pew Research Center - An independent, non-partisan public opinion research organization that studies attitudes toward politics, the press and public policy issues Debate Central -Sponsored by the National Center for Policy Analysis.

Debatabase - Created for debaters worldwide, this site is an excellent place to get ideas for topics, a summary of the controversial nature of the issue and a list of the pro and con arguments for the topic. Law/Legislation Sites The White House - Search the White House Web Site for information about the President's official policy on various issues.

ProCon.org - Pros and Cons of Controversial Issues. Idebate.org. Middleschooldebate. 50 Persuasive Speech & Debate Topics Relevant Today | The Teaching Factor. Each semester I have my students write and present a persuasive speech and participate in two debates. Over the years I have used a variety of speech topics. Most of the topics emerge from current events. For each speech assignment students are given a differentiated list of choices around a specific theme. Below are 50 of the more recent persuasive speech and debate topics I have used with my students. I. Does video violence effects the teenage brain? II. Should physical education be mandatory for all students every day of the school week? III. Are Americans Getting Fatter?

IV. Does the US federal government have the authority to either detain without charge or search without probable cause? V. Controversial T-Shirts – If a student wears a controversial T-shirt, does the school board have the right to ban offensive and controversial clothing or does the student have the right to wear it under the first amendment? VI. Are desktop computer outdated? VII. Like this: Like Loading...

Persuasive Speech. 182 Questions to Write or Talk About. 2007gamesandactivitiesguide.pdf. Julian Treasure: How to speak so that people want to listen. Debate. Logos, Ethos and Pathos: 3 Ways to Appeal to an Audience in Essays - Video & Lesson Transcript. Last revised: March, 2014 Acceptance of Terms Please read this Terms of Service Agreement ("Terms of Service", "Terms of Use") carefully. These terms apply to Education Portal and its related websites owned and operated by Remilon, LLC ("Education Portal,", "Site", "Sites", "our", "us").

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Privacy Policy Education Portal respects your privacy and permits you to control the treatment of your personal information. Terms Applicable to All Services a. I. B. 18 Paths to Pathos: How to Connect with Your Audience. The previous article of the Ethos, Pathos, and Logos series defined pathos and described why emotional connection is so important for your presentations. In this article, we explore how to build strong pathos in your presentations through a variety of emotional pathways. Pathos Superhighways: Your Primary Paths to Emotional Connection All roads are not created equally. Freeways move lots of traffic fast; country lanes often guide just a single, meandering car. Similarly, all pathways to emotional connection with your audience are not created equally. Themes and PointsWordsAnalogies and MetaphorsStoriesHumorVisualsDelivery Techniques #1: Select Emotional Themes and Points You always have choices to make about which points to include in the time allotted.

Three Pillars of Public Speaking Example: Suppose you have identified fifteen reasons why your audience should consider public speaking training. . #2: Choose Words which Add Emotional Emphasis #3: Use Rich Analogies and Metaphors #4: Tell Stories.