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Julian Treasure: How to speak so that people want to listen

Julian Treasure: How to speak so that people want to listen
Julian Treasure: How to speak so that people want to listen Have you ever felt like you're talking, but nobody is listening? Here's Julian Treasure to help. In this useful talk, the sound expert demonstrates the how-to's of powerful speaking — from some handy vocal exercises to tips on how to speak with empathy. A talk that might help the world sound more beautiful. This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

http://www.ted.com/talks/julian_treasure_how_to_speak_so_that_people_want_to_listen

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